Douglas Walton


Douglas Walton

Biography

Douglas Walton was an actor who had a successful Hollywood career. Early on in his acting career, Walton landed roles in various films, including "The Secret of Madame Blanche" (1933), "Charlie Chan in London" (1934) and the drama "The Lost Patrol" (1934) with Victor McLaglen. He also appeared in "Madame Spy" (1934), the Robert Donat adventure "The Count of Monte Cristo" (1934) and ...

Biography

Douglas Walton was an actor who had a successful Hollywood career. Early on in his acting career, Walton landed roles in various films, including "The Secret of Madame Blanche" (1933), "Charlie Chan in London" (1934) and the drama "The Lost Patrol" (1934) with Victor McLaglen. He also appeared in "Madame Spy" (1934), the Robert Donat adventure "The Count of Monte Cristo" (1934) and "The Dark Angel" (1935) with Fredric March. He continued to act in productions like "The Garden Murder Case" (1936), the Katharine Hepburn dramatic adaptation "Mary of Scotland" (1936) and "Flight From Glory" (1937). He also appeared in "Damaged Goods" (1937). In the latter half of his career, he continued to act in "Northwest Passage" (1940) with Spencer Tracy, "Too Many Girls" (1940) with George Bassman and the David Niven crime picture "Raffles" (1940). He also appeared in the drama "The Long Voyage Home" (1940) with John Wayne and "Murder, My Sweet" (1944). Walton more recently acted in the Lee Tracy crime flick "High Tide" (1947). Walton passed away in November 1961 at the age of 51.

Filmography

 

Cast (Feature Film)

Three Came Home (1950)
Australian prisoner of war
Command Decision (1949)
English voice
The Secret of St. Ives (1949)
Allan St. Ives
Calamity Jane and Sam Bass (1949)
Bookmaker
Trouble Preferred (1948)
Slippy Patterson, pickpocket
Hills of Home (1948)
Minister
High Tide (1947)
Clinton Vaughn
High Conquest (1947)
Young Banning
Green Dolphin Street (1947)
Sir Charles Maloney
Forever Amber (1947)
Fop
Cloak and Dagger (1946)
British pilot
Dick Tracy vs. Cueball (1946)
Percival Priceless
Our Hearts Were Growing Up (1946)
Terence Marlowe
Kitty (1946)
Philip
Bring on the Girls (1945)
Edgar
The Picture of Dorian Gray (1945)
Allen Campbell
Murder, My Sweet (1944)
Lindsay Marriott
Jesse James, Jr. (1942)
Archie McDonald
Desperate Journey (1942)
British officer
Singapore Woman (1941)
Roy Bennett
Hurry, Charlie, Hurry (1941)
Michael Prescott
One Night in Lisbon (1941)
Frank
Northwest Passage (Book I--Rogers' Rangers) (1940)
Lieutenant Avery
Too Many Girls (1940)
Beverly Waverly
The Letter (1940)
Well-wisher
The Long Voyage Home (1940)
Second mate
Northwest Passage (1940)
The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle (1939)
Student pilot
The Sun Never Sets (1939)
Carpenter
Bad Lands (1939)
Mulford
Raffles (1939)
Bunny [Manders]
Storm over Bengal (1938)
Terry
Flight from Glory (1937)
Garth Hilton
Nation Aflame (1937)
Tommy Franklin
Marriage Forbidden (1937)
George [Dupont]
Wallaby Jim of the Islands (1937)
Norman
Camille (1936)
Henry
Thank You, Jeeves! (1936)
Edward McDermott
I Conquer the Sea! (1936)
Leonard
The Garden Murder Case (1936)
Floyd Gordon
Mary of Scotland (1936)
[Lord] Darnley
Bride of Frankenstein (1935)
Percy Bysshe Shelley
Captain Hurricane (1935)
Jimmy Howell
Hitch Hike Lady (1935)
Alfred Bosworth Blake
The Dark Angel (1935)
Roulston
Mutiny on the Bounty (1935)
Stewart
The Count of Monte Cristo (1934)
Albert [de Mondego]
The Lost Patrol (1934)
Pearson
Shock (1934)
Gilroy Hayworth
Charlie Chan in London (1934)
Hugh Gray
Madame Spy (1934)
Karl
Murder in Trinidad (1934)
Gregory Bronson
The Thin Man (1934)
Taxi driver
Looking Forward (1933)
Willie [Benton]
The Secret of Madame Blanche (1933)
Leonard [St. John], Junior
Over the Hill (1931)
Stephen

Writer (Feature Film)

Cat City (2009)
Screenplay
Face of Terror (2003)
Story By
The Bad Pack (1998)
Screenwriter

Life Events

Photo Collections

Mary of Scotland - Scene Stills
Here are some scene stills from RKO's Mary of Scotland (1936), directed by John Ford and starring Katharine Hepburn and Fredric March.

Videos

Movie Clip

Bride Of Frankenstein (1935) - Perfect Night For Mystery And Horror Presumably on their famous Swiss vacation, summer 1816, Gavin Gordon as Byron, Douglas Walton as Shelley, Elsa Lanchester (who will also play the title role) as his wife Mary, imagined by director James Whale, with highlights from his 1931 hit, opening the sequel Bride Of Frankenstein, 1935.
Murder, My Sweet (1944) - A Black Pool Opened Up Flinty P-I Marlowe (Dick Powell) expresses distaste as he agrees to help foppish Marriott (Douglas Walton) execute a trade, in Edward Dmytryk's Murder,My Sweet, 1944, from a Raymond Chandler novel.
Lost Patrol, The (1934) - I Could See From Here To Bloomsbury The Sergeant (Victor McLaglen) holds a strategy session with the whole squad, leading to cheerful Hale (Billy Bevan) volunteering to climb a tree, in John Ford's The Lost Patrol, 1934.
Lost Patrol, The (1934) - A Mohammedan Mosque The squad, led by "The Sergeant" (Victor McLaglen) at the oasis, in order, Brandon Hurst, Sammy Stein, Reginald Denny, J.M. Kerrigan, Boris Karloff, Douglas Watson, Paul Hanson, Alan Hale, in John Ford's The Lost Patrol, 1934.
Count of Monte Cristo, The (1934) - Dust Off Your Memory Dantes (Robert Donat, now as "Monte Cristo") catches Mondego (Douglas Walton) about to commit murder, then reveals himself as his elegant vengeance begins in Rowland V. Lee's The Count of Monte Cristo, 1934.
Count of Monte Cristo, The (1934) - He's Had His Trial Honest French captain Edmond Dantes (Robert Donat) gets framed under the authority of De Villefort (Louis Calhern) and his turncoat romantic rival Mondego (Douglas Walton) and ex-friend Danglers (Raymond Walburn) in The Count of Monte Cristo, 1934.
Raffles (1939) - Can This Be You Talking? The end of the jewel robbery, in which David Niven, the gentleman-thief, cricket-star title character is barely seen, then we meet Bunny (Douglas Watson), Olivia De Havilland as sister Gwen, the love interest, then Lady and Lord Melrose (Dame May Whitty, Lionel Pape), in Samuel Goldwyn’s Raffles, 1939.
Dick Tracy Vs. Cueball - You Dirty Stoolie! Dick (Morgan Conway) and sidekick Pat (Lyle Latell) tail nefarious antique dealer Percival Priceless (Douglas Walton) to the "Dripping Dagger" where Cueball (Dick Wessel) awaits, Dick interviewing Flora (Esther Howard) until action ensues, in Dick Tracy Vs. Cueball, 1946.

Bibliography