Kitty


1h 44m 1946
Kitty

Brief Synopsis

A penniless British lord passes a street urchin off as a lady to sell her to a rich husband.

Photos & Videos

Kitty - Photos from Movie Tie-In book
Kitty - Movie Posters

Film Details

Genre
Romance
Drama
Historical
Release Date
Jan 25, 1946
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Kitty by Rosamond Marshall (New York, 1943).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 44m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
10 reels

Synopsis

In Houndsditch, London, in the mid-eighteenth century, Kitty, a hungry gamin, is beaten by her keeper, Old Meg, when she fails to bring home expensive buckles. After Kitty is caught stealing a pair of shoes belonging to noted painter Thomas Gainsborough, Gainsborough paints her portrait, titling it "Portrait of an Unknown Lady." Ne'er-do-well Sir Hugh Marcy visits Gainsborough with Brett Harwood, the Earl of Carstairs, and meets Kitty. Hugh, who was expelled from the Foreign Office in favor of the Duke of Malmunster's nephew, and presently is close to debtor's prison, takes Kitty home to be his scullery maid. Gainsborough's work is rivalled only by that of Sir Joshua Reynolds, and at the unveiling of Kitty's portrait, all of London's high society is awed by the anonymous beauty. When the Duke of Malmunster demands to know who she is, Hugh fabricates Kitty's origins so that the duke will want to marry her, and the duke agrees to restore him to the Foreign Office in exchange for an introduction to Kitty. Hugh and his drunken aunt, Lady Susan Dewitt, give Kitty etiquette and elocution lessons. When Hugh is taken to debtor's prison, Kitty, now in love with him, marries her neighbor, an ironmonger named Jonathan Selby, in order to pay for Hugh's release. When Selby catches Kitty stealing from him and starts to beat her, her devoted maid kills Selby, then herself. Kitty soon learns she is pregnant and agrees to marry the duke for Hugh's sake. The duke, an old man who is desperate for an heir, is delighted to learn, at the return of their honeymoon, that his bride is pregnant. She gives birth to a boy, but after his first glimpse of the baby, the duke, who has a weak heart, falls down the stairs and dies, leaving a considerable fortune to his duchess. When Hugh again suggests that Kitty marry, she angrily confesses that she is in love with him, but he cannot see past her sordid upbringing. While out with Gainsborough, Kitty again meets Brett, who has just returned from India, and he falls in love with her. While viewing Gainsborough's latest portrait of Kitty as the Duchess of Malmunster, Hugh finally realizes he is in love with her, but Kitty meets his ardent confession with bitterness and throws him out. At Brett and Kitty's engagement party, Hugh brings Old Meg to meet Brett and divulge Kitty's past, believing that Brett will call off the marriage. Brett is determined to marry Kitty despite her lowly birth, however, causing Hugh to exit graciously. Touched by Hugh's genuine love, Kitty runs after him, and they kiss.

Cast

Paulette Goddard

Kitty

Ray Milland

Sir Hugh Marcy

Patric Knowles

Brett Harwood, Earl of Carstairs

Reginald Owen

Duke of Malmunster

Cecil Kellaway

Thomas Gainsborough

Constance Collier

Lady Susan Dewitt

Dennis Hoey

Jonathan Selby

Sara Allgood

Old Meg

Eric Blore

Dobson

Gordon Richards

Sir Joshua Reynolds

Michael Dyne

H.R.H. The Prince of Wales

Edgar Norton

Earl of Campton

Patricia Cameron

Elaine Carlisle

Percival Vivian

Doctor Holt

Mary Gordon

Nanny

Anita Bolster

Nullens

Heather Wilde

Lil

Charles Coleman

Majordomo

Mae Clark

Molly

Ann Codee

Madame Aurelie

Douglas Walton

Philip

Alec Craig

McNab

Edward Cooper

Sir Harbord Harbord

Anne Curson

Duchess of Gloucester

Crauford Kent

Sir Joshua's friend

Colin Kenny

Mr. Thickness

Hilda Plowright

Mrs. Thickness

Charles Irwin

Barrows

Jean Ransome

Duke's maid

Mary Maclaren

Duke's maid

Kitty Watson

Singing flowerhawker

Betty Fairfax

Fishhawker

Marie Reeves

Fishhawker

Doris Lloyd

Fishhawker

Lou Davis

Fishhawker

Jack Raymond

Fishhawker

T. Arthur Hughes

Fishhawker

Tempe Pigott

Woman in window

Ethel May Halls

Cockney woman

Norman Ainsley

Bakerhawker

Bobbie Hale

Hawker with donkey

Eric Wilton

Cockney man/Waiter

Bob Stephenson

Stevedore

Frank Hagney

Stevedore

John Power

Cockney cart driver/Ink hawker

Jimmy Aubrey

Cockney cart driver

John Rice

Cockney cart driver

Frank Benson

Vinegarhawker

Tiny Jones

Fish and chips woman

Jean Prescott

English woman with children

Donald Dewar

English child

Delphine Harding

English child

Haldor De Becker

English child

Sherlee Collier

English child

Boyd Irwin

Passerby

Leyland Hodgson

Passerby

Al Ferguson

Footman

Herbert Evans

Footman

Robert Cory

Lantern merchant/Hazard banker/Watchman

Sybil Bacon

Magic lantern woman

Perseus Ruth

Milkmaid

Tom Mcguire

Vegetable hawker

Violet Seton

Flowerhawker

Sylvia Andrew

Flowerhawker

Stanley Mann

Knife-sharpener hawker

Wilson Benge

Bellow and bucker mender

George Broughton

Spoon and larding pin hawker/Waiter

Florence Benson

Broomhawker

Doreen Munroe

Fresh salad hawker

Billy Evans

Rabbitskin hawker

Snub Pollard

Hugh's rental coachman

Reed Porter

Rupert

Paul Scardon

Undertaker

Helena Grant

Selby housekeeper

Ruth St. Denis

Duchess

Victor Travers

Duke's best man

Evan Thomas

Chaplain

Frank Baker

Assistant Faro Banker

Arthur Mulliner

Assistant Faro Banker

Gordon Arnold

Duke's footman

Byron Ruggles

Duke's footman

David Cavendish

Head Faro banker

Ernest Hilliard

Assistant Hazard banker

Guy Bellis

Faro banker

Charles Shrader

Groom of Chambers

Leslie Denison

Mr. Sheridan

Mary Mcleod

Mrs. Sheridan

Anthony Marsh

Cripplegate

William Thomas

Duke's pageboy

Clara Reid

Midwife

Sydney Lawford

Sir Geoffrey Tennant

Matthew Boulton

Soliciter

George Kirby

Soliciter

Marie Grosscup

Specialty dancer

Phyllis Adair

Young girl

Nancy Russell

Young girl

Elsie Prescott

Baked apple hawker

Sanders Clark

Young dandy/Guest

Anne Howard

Asses milkmaid

Pamela Ewing

Flower girl

Audrey Manners

Flower girl

Lucy Storm

Flower girl

Dodo Barnard

Taffy tarts peddler

John Meredith

Guest

Ivo Henderson

Guest

Alan Schute

Guest

Phyllis Barry

Guest

Stuart Hall

Guest

Doris Stone

Guest

Fred Fox

Rat-killer hawker

Viola Moore

Guest/Newspaper woman

David Thursby

Gingerbread hawker

Lilyan Irene

Apple hawker

Cyril Delevanti

"All hot" hawker

Gibson Gowland

Prison guard

John Deauville

Earl of Barrymore

Audrey Westphall

Girl with Barrymore

Byron Poindexter

Col. St. Leger

Miriam Franklin

Girl with St. Leger

Madge Meredith

June Mcclain

Crew

Nelle Armstrong

Dance Secretary

Dr. Maurice Black

Tech artistic adv

Haskell Boggs

2nd Camera

Richard Brandow

Props

Eleanor Broder

Secretary to Director

Constance Collier

Dial coach

Sam Comer

Set Decoration

John Coonan

Assistant Director

Irving Cooper

Screenplay clerk

Earl Crowley

Stills

Billy Daniels

Dances staged by

Danny Dare

Dance Director

Jan Domela

Assistant Special Photographer Effects, Matte paintings

Hans Dreier

Art Director

Josephine Earl

Assistant Dance Director

Farciot Edouart

Process Photography

Eleanor Edwards

Secretary to prod

Constance Emerald

Paulette Goddard's Cockney dialect coach

Daniel L. Fapp

Director of Photography

Charles Gemora

Painter of "Blue Boy" copy

Hilda Grenier

Tech consultant

Loyal Griggs

Assistant process Photographer

Tex Harris

2nd Assistant Director

Bill Hurley

Livestock Supervisor

Gordon Jennings

Special Photography Effects

Don Johnson

Sound Recording

T. Johnston

Assistant props

Madame Karinska

Costume Executive by

Geza Kende

Painter of Goddard portraits

Willa Kim

Sketch artist

Sam Ledner

Dance Supervisor

Mitchell Leisen

Company

Paul Lerpae

Assistant Special Photographer Effects

Phyllis Loughton

Dial coach

Alma Macrorie

Editing

Al Mann

Dance Director

Lenny Mcghee

Secretary to prod

Don Mckay

Sound Recording

Ray Moyer

Set Decoration

Raoul Pène Du Bois

Settings and Costume Designer by

Helen Gladys Percey

Research Director

I. Phillips

Screenplay clerk

Ed Ralph

Unit Manager

Irmin Roberts

Assistant Special Photographer Effects

Leonora Sabine

Hairdressing Supervisor

Marty Santell

2nd Assistant Director

Edna Shotwell

Wardrobe woman

Elvira Smith

Research Assistant

Syd Street

Loc Department's staff

Heather Thatcher

Paulette Goddard's Cockney dialect coach

Karl Tunberg

Screenwriter

Karl Tunberg

Associate Producer

Walter Tyler

Art Director

Darrell Ware

Associate Producer

Darrell Ware

Screenwriter

Wally Westmore

Makeup Supervisor

Ken Whitmore

Pub

Philip Wisdom

Music mixer

Victor Young

Music Score

Film Details

Genre
Romance
Drama
Historical
Release Date
Jan 25, 1946
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Kitty by Rosamond Marshall (New York, 1943).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 44m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
10 reels

Award Nominations

Best Art Direction

1947

Articles

Kitty


On April 1, 1946, The New York Times film critic Bosley Crowther wrote: "A certain young lady named Amber -- or, at least, her cinematic sponsors in Hollywood -- must be awfully burned at Paramount's Kitty for beating her to the screen."

Crowther was referring to the heroine of Forever Amber, a scandalous and extremely popular novel that was still in the works as a movie from Twentieth Century Fox. Kitty, released by Paramount, was a similar story with a similar tone, and not by accident; Paramount had originally owned the rights to Forever Amber but lost them to Fox. An adaptation of the novel Kitty, by Rosamond Marshall, seemed like a good substitute.

Even though Forever Amber takes place in the seventeenth century and Kitty is set in the eighteenth, the two characters, Crowther aptly noted, "are sisters under their coiffures," with both using sex and cunning to make their way up from nothing to the top tiers of London society. Kitty (Paulette Goddard) is a cockney girl who is discovered and painted by artist Thomas Gainsborough (Cecil Kellaway). She marries a man (Dennis Hoey) for his money, then after his death marries a duke (Reginald Owen), before finally winding up with the lord she's loved all along (Ray Milland).

Kitty showcases Paulette Goddard at the peak of her beauty and ability. To transform in the film from street urchin to refined duchess required Goddard, a native Long Islander, to master two distinct British accents. She worked intensely with a dialogue coach, Phyllis Loughton, but that wasn't all. Director Mitchell Leisen, a stickler for authenticity, had Ida Lupino's cockney mother Connie Emerald move in with Goddard so that the actress could have someone to converse with in cockney literally all day long, every day. Once shooting began, Leisen ordered other actors to speak to Goddard only in cockney even when the cameras weren't rolling. (Leisen did so as well.)

When it came time for Goddard to speak in the more posh accent, "we moved Connie Emerald out and [actress] Constance Collier in," Leisen later recalled. Collier has a role in the film herself, with her character teaching Goddard proper diction and etiquette, Pygmalion-style. Leisen figured having Collier do this off-screen as well would be a good idea.

Of working with Goddard, voice coach Loughton later said: "She is one of the most intelligent women I've ever worked with, but she has never projected her intelligence on screen the way it projects when she is sitting talking in a living room. Her problem was to shift over from the pantomime techniques Chaplin taught her to the kind of dialogue comedy we did at Paramount."

Goddard had earlier been married to, and co-starred with, Charles Chaplin, but at the time of Kitty's production she had just gotten remarried, to Burgess Meredith. In fact, she was pregnant during shooting and suffered a miscarriage shortly afterward.

While Goddard shows off her skills well here, Kitty is even more of a showcase for Mitchell Leisen. The director of such classics as Easy Living (1937) and Midnight (1939) had started his career as an art director and costume designer, and his attention to décor remained his defining stylistic trait even as director. With Kitty, Leisen was able to indulge his obsession to an unusual degree. As biographer David Chierichetti later wrote: "With its opportunity for exact historical reproduction, it was precisely the kind of picture Leisen could do better than anybody else, and its mixture of mannered comedy and gutsy drama suited him perfectly, too. Many critics consider Kitty Leisen's best picture."

Leisen went to great lengths to ensure accuracy. For the sequences in which Gainsborough paints Kitty's portrait, Leisen recalled, "I spent two years researching Gainsborough and the way he painted. We determined that the picture took place in 1659, and there's nothing in the picture that was painted by him after that year. He painted by candlelight. Don't know why; he had his canvases laced on frames with leather thongs and he used a six-foot brush to paint. When it came to paint the faces, he relaced the canvas so that the face was right at the edge, and then he painted with very small brushes and very fine detail. These things are very interesting to me, and so we used them in the picture." When Leisen was unable to borrow real Gainsborough paintings to display in the film, he had high-quality copies made. He claimed to have rejected 13 copies of "Blue Boy" before he was satisfied.

Leisen also related how during the period setting for Kitty, wood-paneled rooms existed in their natural wood color. Soon afterward, a method for painting wood was perfected, and it became fashionable to paint the wood paneling over in white. Consequently, there remained in the 1940s extremely few real-life examples of unpainted, paneled rooms. Leisen, however, had personally bought one such room for his own art collection a few years earlier, from the Hearst estate, and he rented it to Paramount for use in Kitty. (Afterward, he donated it to the Huntington Museum in Pasadena.)

Beyond the amazingly accurate and exquisite sets, Leisen went to great pains to make the costumes, wigs, and even undergarments all faithful to the time period. When Ray Milland teaches Goddard how to hold her fan, it's based on actual literature of the time. Leisen's overall sense of historical accuracy was so great that he was lauded by British historical groups "who felt that Kitty was the most accurate film ever made about the Britain of an earlier day." The film was also nominated for an Oscar® for Best Black-and-White Art Direction, though it lost to Anna and the King of Siam (1946).

Kitty is sometimes referenced as being a 1945 film. In fact, while it had its premiere in 1945, it didn't open commercially until early 1946. It was a big hit and led to a new contract with a massive pay hike for Goddard: she went from $132,000 per year to $100,000 per picture.

Ray Milland, who co-starred with Goddard in four features (plus appearances together in two others), later said he "always liked working with Paulette. She was not a brilliant actress, she had no sense of timing and everything about her playing was mechanical and contrived, but nobody knew it better than she did, and she was completely honest about it. She is the most honest actress I ever knew."

Producer: Mitchell Leisen
Director: Mitchell Leisen
Screenplay: Karl Tunberg, Darrell Ware; Rosamond Marshall (novel "Kitty")
Cinematography: Daniel L. Fapp
Art Direction: Hans Dreier, Walter Tyler
Music: Victor Young
Film Editing: Alma Macrorie
Cast: Paulette Goddard (Kitty), Ray Milland (Sir Hugh Marcy), Patric Knowles (Brett, Earl of Carstairs), Reginald Owen (Duke of Malmunster), Cecil Kellaway (Thomas Gainsborough), Constance Collier (Lady Susan Dowitt), Dennis Hoey (Jonathan Selby), Sara Allgood (Old Meg), Eric Blore (Dobson), Gordon Richards (Sir Joshua Reynolds), Michael Dyne (Prince of Wales), Edward Norton (Earl of Campton).
BW-103m.

by Jeremy Arnold

Sources:
Julie Gilbert, Opposite Attraction: The Lives of Erich Maria Remarque and Paulette Goddard
David Chierichetti, Hollywood Director

Kitty

Kitty

On April 1, 1946, The New York Times film critic Bosley Crowther wrote: "A certain young lady named Amber -- or, at least, her cinematic sponsors in Hollywood -- must be awfully burned at Paramount's Kitty for beating her to the screen." Crowther was referring to the heroine of Forever Amber, a scandalous and extremely popular novel that was still in the works as a movie from Twentieth Century Fox. Kitty, released by Paramount, was a similar story with a similar tone, and not by accident; Paramount had originally owned the rights to Forever Amber but lost them to Fox. An adaptation of the novel Kitty, by Rosamond Marshall, seemed like a good substitute. Even though Forever Amber takes place in the seventeenth century and Kitty is set in the eighteenth, the two characters, Crowther aptly noted, "are sisters under their coiffures," with both using sex and cunning to make their way up from nothing to the top tiers of London society. Kitty (Paulette Goddard) is a cockney girl who is discovered and painted by artist Thomas Gainsborough (Cecil Kellaway). She marries a man (Dennis Hoey) for his money, then after his death marries a duke (Reginald Owen), before finally winding up with the lord she's loved all along (Ray Milland). Kitty showcases Paulette Goddard at the peak of her beauty and ability. To transform in the film from street urchin to refined duchess required Goddard, a native Long Islander, to master two distinct British accents. She worked intensely with a dialogue coach, Phyllis Loughton, but that wasn't all. Director Mitchell Leisen, a stickler for authenticity, had Ida Lupino's cockney mother Connie Emerald move in with Goddard so that the actress could have someone to converse with in cockney literally all day long, every day. Once shooting began, Leisen ordered other actors to speak to Goddard only in cockney even when the cameras weren't rolling. (Leisen did so as well.) When it came time for Goddard to speak in the more posh accent, "we moved Connie Emerald out and [actress] Constance Collier in," Leisen later recalled. Collier has a role in the film herself, with her character teaching Goddard proper diction and etiquette, Pygmalion-style. Leisen figured having Collier do this off-screen as well would be a good idea. Of working with Goddard, voice coach Loughton later said: "She is one of the most intelligent women I've ever worked with, but she has never projected her intelligence on screen the way it projects when she is sitting talking in a living room. Her problem was to shift over from the pantomime techniques Chaplin taught her to the kind of dialogue comedy we did at Paramount." Goddard had earlier been married to, and co-starred with, Charles Chaplin, but at the time of Kitty's production she had just gotten remarried, to Burgess Meredith. In fact, she was pregnant during shooting and suffered a miscarriage shortly afterward. While Goddard shows off her skills well here, Kitty is even more of a showcase for Mitchell Leisen. The director of such classics as Easy Living (1937) and Midnight (1939) had started his career as an art director and costume designer, and his attention to décor remained his defining stylistic trait even as director. With Kitty, Leisen was able to indulge his obsession to an unusual degree. As biographer David Chierichetti later wrote: "With its opportunity for exact historical reproduction, it was precisely the kind of picture Leisen could do better than anybody else, and its mixture of mannered comedy and gutsy drama suited him perfectly, too. Many critics consider Kitty Leisen's best picture." Leisen went to great lengths to ensure accuracy. For the sequences in which Gainsborough paints Kitty's portrait, Leisen recalled, "I spent two years researching Gainsborough and the way he painted. We determined that the picture took place in 1659, and there's nothing in the picture that was painted by him after that year. He painted by candlelight. Don't know why; he had his canvases laced on frames with leather thongs and he used a six-foot brush to paint. When it came to paint the faces, he relaced the canvas so that the face was right at the edge, and then he painted with very small brushes and very fine detail. These things are very interesting to me, and so we used them in the picture." When Leisen was unable to borrow real Gainsborough paintings to display in the film, he had high-quality copies made. He claimed to have rejected 13 copies of "Blue Boy" before he was satisfied. Leisen also related how during the period setting for Kitty, wood-paneled rooms existed in their natural wood color. Soon afterward, a method for painting wood was perfected, and it became fashionable to paint the wood paneling over in white. Consequently, there remained in the 1940s extremely few real-life examples of unpainted, paneled rooms. Leisen, however, had personally bought one such room for his own art collection a few years earlier, from the Hearst estate, and he rented it to Paramount for use in Kitty. (Afterward, he donated it to the Huntington Museum in Pasadena.) Beyond the amazingly accurate and exquisite sets, Leisen went to great pains to make the costumes, wigs, and even undergarments all faithful to the time period. When Ray Milland teaches Goddard how to hold her fan, it's based on actual literature of the time. Leisen's overall sense of historical accuracy was so great that he was lauded by British historical groups "who felt that Kitty was the most accurate film ever made about the Britain of an earlier day." The film was also nominated for an Oscar® for Best Black-and-White Art Direction, though it lost to Anna and the King of Siam (1946). Kitty is sometimes referenced as being a 1945 film. In fact, while it had its premiere in 1945, it didn't open commercially until early 1946. It was a big hit and led to a new contract with a massive pay hike for Goddard: she went from $132,000 per year to $100,000 per picture. Ray Milland, who co-starred with Goddard in four features (plus appearances together in two others), later said he "always liked working with Paulette. She was not a brilliant actress, she had no sense of timing and everything about her playing was mechanical and contrived, but nobody knew it better than she did, and she was completely honest about it. She is the most honest actress I ever knew." Producer: Mitchell Leisen Director: Mitchell Leisen Screenplay: Karl Tunberg, Darrell Ware; Rosamond Marshall (novel "Kitty") Cinematography: Daniel L. Fapp Art Direction: Hans Dreier, Walter Tyler Music: Victor Young Film Editing: Alma Macrorie Cast: Paulette Goddard (Kitty), Ray Milland (Sir Hugh Marcy), Patric Knowles (Brett, Earl of Carstairs), Reginald Owen (Duke of Malmunster), Cecil Kellaway (Thomas Gainsborough), Constance Collier (Lady Susan Dowitt), Dennis Hoey (Jonathan Selby), Sara Allgood (Old Meg), Eric Blore (Dobson), Gordon Richards (Sir Joshua Reynolds), Michael Dyne (Prince of Wales), Edward Norton (Earl of Campton). BW-103m. by Jeremy Arnold Sources: Julie Gilbert, Opposite Attraction: The Lives of Erich Maria Remarque and Paulette Goddard David Chierichetti, Hollywood Director

Quotes

Here, take this tea up to her ladyship.
- Dobson
How'll I find 'er?
- Kitty
Drunk as usual.
- Dobson

Trivia

Notes

Writer/producer Darrell Ware died during the course of this film's production. One of Paulette Goddard's Cockney dialect coaches, Constance Emerald, was the mother of actress Ida Lupino. According to studio press information, director Mitchell Leisen was unable to photograph Sir Thomas Gainsborough's famous "Blue Boy" painting owned by the Huntington Museum in Pasadena, CA, because it was still in war-storage in Arizona, to which most of the Huntington's masterpieces had been shipped after the attack on Pearl Harbor. Studio copyist Charles Gemora, of the makeup department, did a full-size reproduction of the oil painting from color prints. Geza Kende did the portraits of Paulette Goddard. In total, sixty reproductions of Gainsborough pictures were made for the film by ten well-known Southern California artists. Dr. Maurice Black, curator of the Huntington, acted as a technical advisor on the film.
       Press information details the film's elaborate sets: Thirty-five antique fans from the 19th century were purchased by Paramount for the film. The film's set included an entire living room of hand-rubbed natural pine that had been taken by William Randolph Hearst from an English castle built for the Earl of Scarsdale at Sutton-Scarsdate in 1723. The living room was purchased by Leisen from the Hearst estate three years prior to the making of the film. The $15,000 diamond necklace worn by Paulette Goddard in the last scene was her own. The $25,000 vanity set on "Kitty's" dressing table as she prepares to wed the duke was made out of kingfisher green jade and was lent to the studio by the Dorothy Gray cosmetics company. Hans Dreier and Walter Tyler were nominated for an Academy Award for Art Direction (Black-and-White) for Kitty, and Sam Comer and Ray Moyer were nominated for Interior Decoration (Black-and-White). Goddard reprised her role in a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast on February 24, 1947, co-starring Patric Knowles.