Bring on the Girls


1h 32m 1945

Film Details

Also Known As
Homme qui cherche la verite, Man Who Seeks The Truth
Release Date
Mar 30, 1945
Premiere Information
New York opening: 28 Feb 1945
Production Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the French film L'Homme qui cherche la verité written by Pierre Wolff (1941).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 32m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8,240ft

Synopsis

The impressionable J. Newport Bates, America's wealthiest bachelor who is worth two hundred million dollars, breaks his twelfth engagement after discovering that his intended is just another gold digger. Tired of having an identity only through his money, Jay joins the Navy anonymously, but his aunt, uncle and lawyers insist that he be chaperoned by one of the lawyers' nephews, Phil North, who joins the Navy with him. While on liberty at the Coral Club in Miami, Jay meets cigarette girl Teddy Collins, who was once was engaged to Phil. When Teddy learns what Jay is worth, she flirts with him, and he becomes infatuated with her. Phil thinks Jay's new girl is Sue Thomas, a singer at the club, who is a "nice" girl and a banker's daughter. When Jay brings Teddy home to meet his aunt and uncle, Phil is appalled to learn that he is going to marry the gold-digging Teddy. Later Phil confronts Teddy, and she explains that Phil's old band leader, Ray Albany, introduced her to Phil's wife and child, and she was so overwhelmed with guilt that she gave them the $1,200 she has saved for a honeymoon. Phil insists that he has never been married and was framed by Ray into staying with the band rather than get married, but Teddy remains bitter. Phil tells Jay he cannot marry his girl, and to test Teddy's intentions, Jay pretends to be deaf and hears Teddy tell Phil that she is only after Jay's money. Teddy then realizes Jay is faking his deafness and slyly restores his faith in her. Phil leaves and gets drunk. The newspapers then report that Ray, who had been abroad entertaining the troops, has been taken by the Nazis. The report includes a picture of Ray's wife and child, whom Teddy recognizes as the ones to whom she gave Phil's money. Teddy tells Jay she is in love with Phil and goes to find him. A distraught Jay then visits Sue, who also has had to fend off a string of greedy suitors and welcomes Jay's sincerity. Believing Jay is deaf, Sue tells her maid that she likes him, and he suddenly reveals that he can hear perfectly well, then throws a party for her at the Coral Club. Although angry at Jay for tricking her into confessing her love, Sue comes to the party. Phil arrives and insists that he kiss the bride, still believing that Teddy is going to marry Jay, but she assures him it is Phil whom she loves. After Phil carries Teddy off, Jay tries to lift Sue but falls and they kiss.

Film Details

Also Known As
Homme qui cherche la verite, Man Who Seeks The Truth
Release Date
Mar 30, 1945
Premiere Information
New York opening: 28 Feb 1945
Production Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the French film L'Homme qui cherche la verité written by Pierre Wolff (1941).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 32m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8,240ft

Articles

Doris Dowling (1923-2004)


Doris Dowling, the sultry actress who made a memorable film debut as the saloon hooker in Billy Wilder's The Lost Weekend died on June 18 in Los Angeles of natural causes. She was 81.

Doris Dowling was born on May 15, 1923 in Detroit, Michigan. She showed an interest in acting at a young age, and after a few years of stage work in the Midwest, she joined her older sister, the leading lady Constance Dowling, in Hollywood. Paramount soon took notice of the sultry brunette with the soulful expression and husky voice, and promptly signed her to a contract.

She made a stunning film debut as Gloria, the hooker who befriends Ray Milland at a bar, becoming his good-humored confidante in The Lost Weekend (1945); she followed that up in the overlooked, film noir gem, The Blue Dahlia (1946), playing Alan Ladd's shrewish wife before being killed by a mystery killer in the first reel. She made another noir thriller, the forgettable, The Crimson Key (1947), playing, once again, an unsympathetic part before heading off to Europe. Once there, Italian director Giuseppe de Santis used her effectively in Bitter Rice (1948), arguably her best performance as the jewelry thief hiding among women rice workers in Northern Italy; another notable role was as Bianca in Orson Welles' French production of Othello (1951).

She returned to Hollywood in the late '50s, and spent the next three decades doing television work: Bonanza, Perry Mason, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Barnaby Jones, and The Streets of San Francisco, just to name a few. She retired quietly from acting by the early '80s. She was briefly married to bandleader Artie Shaw (1952-56), and is survived by her son through that marriage, Jonathan; and her husband of 44 years, Leonard Kaufman.

by Michael T. Toole
Doris Dowling (1923-2004)

Doris Dowling (1923-2004)

Doris Dowling, the sultry actress who made a memorable film debut as the saloon hooker in Billy Wilder's The Lost Weekend died on June 18 in Los Angeles of natural causes. She was 81. Doris Dowling was born on May 15, 1923 in Detroit, Michigan. She showed an interest in acting at a young age, and after a few years of stage work in the Midwest, she joined her older sister, the leading lady Constance Dowling, in Hollywood. Paramount soon took notice of the sultry brunette with the soulful expression and husky voice, and promptly signed her to a contract. She made a stunning film debut as Gloria, the hooker who befriends Ray Milland at a bar, becoming his good-humored confidante in The Lost Weekend (1945); she followed that up in the overlooked, film noir gem, The Blue Dahlia (1946), playing Alan Ladd's shrewish wife before being killed by a mystery killer in the first reel. She made another noir thriller, the forgettable, The Crimson Key (1947), playing, once again, an unsympathetic part before heading off to Europe. Once there, Italian director Giuseppe de Santis used her effectively in Bitter Rice (1948), arguably her best performance as the jewelry thief hiding among women rice workers in Northern Italy; another notable role was as Bianca in Orson Welles' French production of Othello (1951). She returned to Hollywood in the late '50s, and spent the next three decades doing television work: Bonanza, Perry Mason, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Barnaby Jones, and The Streets of San Francisco, just to name a few. She retired quietly from acting by the early '80s. She was briefly married to bandleader Artie Shaw (1952-56), and is survived by her son through that marriage, Jonathan; and her husband of 44 years, Leonard Kaufman. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

All known copies in circulation are missing a 40-second segment from the Spike Jones production number, referring to "Eleanor" (Roosevelt). Please check your attic. After its theatrical run, the joke was soon outdated.

Notes

The film's working title was All Around the Town. Writer Pierre Wolff, whose onscreen credit reads "From a story by," wrote the screenplay for the French film L'homme qui cherche la verité, on which Bring on the Girls is based. In October 1941, the French film was released with English subtitles in the U.S. as The Man Who Seeks the Truth. Although the Golden Gate Quartet is listed in the CBCS, information in the MPAA/PCA File at the AMPAS Library reveals that their scene was edited out of the film, and their screen credit was therefore deleted. This was dancer Johnny Coy's first film. Several reviews praised his performance, including Hollywood Reporter, which stated: "One of the most conspicuous personal triumphs is scored by Johnny Coy, a young, loose-jointed tap dancer whose skill with his feet is astounding and stamps him as one of the best anywhere." According to Hollywood Citizen-News, Paramount paid $30,000 for the rights to the 1927 song "Chloe," which Spike Jones and his City Slickers burlesqued for the first time on film. The song is sung in the film by saxophone player Red Ingle. According to Paramount news, Jones and his orchestra previously had performed the piece over shortwave radio for U.S. fighting forces.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1945

Released in United States 1945