Ticket to Paradise


1h 10m 1936

Film Details

Release Date
Jul 10, 1936
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 10m
Film Length
6,043ft (7 reels)

Synopsis

Terry Dodd is rushing to the Chicago airport when his taxi is involved in an accident and he gets amnesia. Remembering only that he was in a hurry, Terry boards a train to New York and winds up at a police station after a passing policeman becomes suspicious of his strange behavior and the $10,000 in his pocket. The police turn him over to a group of psychiatrists, who decide that he is a cab driver, and so, under the name Jack Doe, Terry drives a cab and searches for people who recognize him. He picks up Jane, the daughter of securities magnate Robert Forbes, who is at first put off by his eccentric ways but quickly warms to him after hearing his sad story. She invites Terry to her home, where he wins the good will of Forbes after punching Tony Bates, Jane's loutish playboy friend whom Forbes abhors. While there, Terry receives word that he has been fired for not being on the job, but is immediately hired by Forbes. Later, it becomes apparent to Forbes that Terry is using his new position to find out who he is, and is involving all the other employees in the search as well. Forbes fires Terry, but must face the fact that Terry and Jane are in love, and so strikes a bargain with Terry that unless he establishes his identity within three weeks, he must stop seeing Jane. Terry and Jane continue the search by creating as much publicity as possible, including a radio plea for anyone who is missing someone to write to them. They visit the people who write, but when that proves fruitless, they plot to have Terry's photograph displayed in as many newspapers as possible by performing outlandish stunts. In the resulting photographs, however, Terry's face is always concealed while Jane's legs are prominently displayed. Forbes's business suffers due to the wild publicity, and he sends detective Nirney to track the pair down. Meanwhile, Colton and George Small, two shady characters, recognize Terry when he and Jane arrive in Chicago and, in order to protect a mysterious deal, they convince Terry that he is Dan Kelly, owner of the Paradise Club. The real Kelly cooperates with the charade, and all goes well until Forbes arrives in Chicago and has Nirney investigate Kelly. They discover that Kelly is a gangster, and when they go to the club to tell Jane, a huge brawl occurs, during which Terry is again hit on the head. When he wakes up in the hospital, Terry remembers his identity and that he was on his way to close an important deal for his company, Dodd Steel. Terry finds out that he has until noon to submit his bid to the businessman involved, Fred Townsend, and that Townsend is at a nearby hotel. Terry rushes to the hotel just as Townsend is about to award the contract to Terry's competitors, none other than Colton and Small, but Terry's bid is the lowest and he wins the contract. Jane follows him, and while Terry does not recognize her at first, her kiss jogs his memory, and Forbes happily gives them his blessing.

Film Details

Release Date
Jul 10, 1936
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 10m
Film Length
6,043ft (7 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

According to a April 25, 1936 Hollywood Reporter news item, Republic purchased a story entitled "Ticket to Paradise" from magazine writer Francis M. Cockrell. However, no information has been found to indicate that Cockrell's story was the basis of this film. According to Hollywood Reporter news items, Olive Cooper was assigned to work on the picture's script, and Nat Levine hired writer David Silverstein to supervise the production as well as write the original story. Victor Zobel is credited onscreen as the film's supervisor, however. Hollywood Reporter production charts list Paul Parry in the cast; but the participation of Cooper and Parry in the completed film has not been confirmed. Although contemporary reviews lists Luis Alberni's character as "Dr. Munson," in the film he is called "Dr. Monte."