Tango & Cash


1h 38m 1989

Brief Synopsis

After being set up by the Mafia, two rival policeman are forced to ban together to free themselves, and clear their names.

Film Details

Also Known As
Set-Up, Tango and Cash, Tango et Cash, Tango y Cash
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Action
Release Date
1989
Production Company
John Sheridan
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA; Washington, DC, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Mansfield, Ohio, USA; New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Cincinnati, Ohio, USA; Puerto Rico

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 38m

Synopsis

After being set up by the Mafia, two rival policeman are forced to ban together to free themselves, and clear their names.

Crew

Brad Anderson

Costumes

Pete Antico

Stunts

James M Arnett

Stunt Coordinator

Wayne Artman

Sound

Stuart Baird

Executive Editor

Tom Beckert

Sound

Michael Been

Song Performer

Jon G Belyeu

Special Effects Coordinator

Richard Berger

Art Director

Stu Bernstein

Sound Editor

James Beshears

Adr Editor

Janis Biewend

Assistant

Richard Bisseti

Special Effects

Gerald H Boatright

Lighting Technician

Paul E Borchardt

Key Grip

James T Boyle

Lighting Technician

Melissa Bremner

Stand-In

Sharleen Bright

Other

Jophery Brown

Stunts

Leah Brown

Costumes

Jim Burk

Stunts

Jonathan Cain

Song

Adam Carr

Production Assistant

John Casino

Stunts

Pavel Cerny

Location Manager

Steve Chambers

Stunts

Desmond Child

Song

Robin Clark

Unit Production Manager

Vince Clarke

Song

Simon Coke

Sound Editor

Gil Combs

Stunts

Gary Compton

Stunts

Alice Cooper

Song

Alice Cooper

Song Performer

Marion Cronin

Script Supervisor

Tom Dahl

Sound

Glenn Daniels

Casting

Susan Daniels

Production Assistant

Peter Davidian

Lighting Technician

Bud Davis

Stunts

Hubert C De La Bouillerie

Editor

Mark Deallessandro

Stunts

Tom Delgenio

Special Effects

Michael Deluna

Stunts

Justin Derosa

Stunts

Joseph Derrico

Production Assistant

Shirley Dolle

Hair

Les Dupont

Assistant Camera Operator

Breck Eisner

Production Assistant

Marty Ewing

Assistant Director

Harold Faltermeyer

Music

Randy Feldman

Screenplay

Robert A. Ferretti

Editor

Ed Fincher

Costume Supervisor

Michael L. Fink

Visual Effects Supervisor

Lila Finn

Stunts

David Friedman

Photography

Larry Fuentes

Special Effects

Florin Furda

Assistant

Craig Gentry

Other

Michael Gibbons

Other

Charlie Gilbride

Stunts

Marilyn Glass

Assistant

Daniel C Gold

Assistant Camera Operator

Robert J Goldstein

Location Manager

Tracy Granger

Assistant Editor

Peter Guber

Producer

Earle H. Hagen

Song

James Halty

Stunts

Charles S Hanson

Transportation

Steven Harding

Assistant

Jeff Harnaday

Choreographer

Steve Hart

Stunts

Charles Hatcher

Dolly Grip

Freddie Hice

Stunts

Steve Holladay

Stunts

Axel Hubert

Assistant Editor

Thomas J Huff

Stunts

Gary Hymes

Stunt Coordinator

Jeff Imada

Stunts

Louis Infante

Costume Supervisor

Craig Jaeger

Foley Artist

Audrey A Johnson

Property Master Assistant

Kent Johnson

Property Master

Barbara Kalish

Associate Producer

Carlton Kaller

Music Editor

Alec Kamp

Production Assistant

Alan S Kaye

Set Designer

Maria Kelly

Stunts

Bill Kenney

Art Director

David Klassen

Art Director

Peter Kuran

Visual Effects

Bruce Lacey

Adr Editor

Dave Lea

Technical Advisor

Richard Lea

Special Effects

Rick Lefevour

Stunts

Michael Lent

Production Assistant

Stratton Leopold

Unit Production Manager

Dennis Liddiard

Makeup

Gary Liddiard

Makeup

Julio Macat

Director Of Photography

Peter Macdonald

Executive Producer

Albert Magnoli

Other

Louis Mann

Set Designer

Marvin March

Set Decorator

Robert Martel

Sound Editor

Don H Matthews

Sound Mixer

John Mccurry

Song

Josh Mclaglen

Assistant Director

Gary Mclarty

Stunts

Brad Michaelson

Dga Trainee

Bob Moore

Dolly Grip

Tony Munafo

Associate Producer

Paul Murphey

Video Assist/Playback

Michael Murphy

Assistant Editor

Jeff O'haco

Stunts

Bob Orrison

Stunts

David Page

Costumes

Jack Palinkas

Key Grip

Marshall Peck

Production Assistant

Manny Perry

Stunts

Susan Persily

Assistant

Jon Peters

From Story

Jon Peters

Producer

Bernie Pollack

Costume Designer

Samuel E Price

Special Effects

Timothy Prince

Video Assist/Playback

Jerry A Ranger

Music

Michael Raspa

Assistant Camera Operator

Brian Reeves

Music

Effie Reuveni

Foley Editor

L A Ried

Song

J. Michael Riva

Production Designer

Bill Riyusaki

Stunts

John Rizzo

Makeup

J. N. Roberts

Stunts

Wayne Roberts

Transportation

Artist Robinson

Assistant Director

Pat Romano

Stunts

Ronnie Rondell

Stunts

Mark L Roth

Production Accountant

Michael Runyard

Stunts

Lane Gregory Russell

Assistant Camera Operator

Gina M Rutledge

Foley Artist

Robert R Rutledge

Sound Editor

Dennis Salcedo

Boom Operator

Kathy Sarreal

Other

Neal Schon

Song

James D. Schwalm

Special Effects

Kenneth Schwarz

Boom Operator

Ben R Scott

Stunts

John Sheridan

Cable Operator

Neil I Silver

Assistant Editor

D Simmons

Song

Clyde A Smith

Dolly Grip

Dennis Smith

Camera Operator

Eric Smith

Lighting Technician

Fred Smith

Camera Operator

Paul H Stewart

Special Effects

Mark P. Stoeckinger

Sound Editor

Robert Stoker

Special Effects

Robert Stradling

Assistant Camera Operator

Daniel R Suhart

Assistant Director

Philip Tan

Technical Advisor

Donald E. Thorin

Director Of Photography

Jeffrey S Thorin

Assistant Camera Operator

Joe Valentine

Camera Operator

Michael Van Woert

Rigging Gaffer

Steve Vandeman

Stunts

Richard T Vanik

Camera Operator

Robert Vazquez

Technical Advisor

Larry Verne

Construction Coordinator

Elpe Villard

Other

Jason Villard

Production Assistant

Eddie Lee Voelker

Transportation Captain

Veronique Vowell

Location Manager

John Waite

Song

Robert Waxman

Sound Editor

Kathryn Weygand

Script Supervisor

Charles Wilborn

Sound Mixer

Dean E Williams

Photography

Jeff Winn

Craft Service

Michael Wright

Foreman

Richard Wright

Assistant Director

Dick Ziker

Stunts

Richie Zito

Song

Film Details

Also Known As
Set-Up, Tango and Cash, Tango et Cash, Tango y Cash
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Action
Release Date
1989
Production Company
John Sheridan
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA; Washington, DC, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Mansfield, Ohio, USA; New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Cincinnati, Ohio, USA; Puerto Rico

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 38m

Articles

Edward Bunker (1933-2005)


Edward Bunker, the tough, charismatic ex-convict who eventaully turned his life around and became a respected writer, (No Beast So Fierce) and actor (Resevoir Dogs), died in Burbank on July 19 after complications developed from a surgical procedure to improve circulation in his legs. He was 71.

He was born on December 31, 1933 in Hollywood, California to a mother who was a chorus girl in a few Busby Berkely musicals, and a father who was a studio grip; two of the lesser positions in the Hollywood hierarchy. After his parents divorced when he was four, he spent the next several years in various foster homes and juvenile reform schools. By 14, he notched his first criminal conviction for burglery; at 17, he stabbed a youth prison guard; and by 19, he was considered so violent a felon, that he became the youngest inmate ever at San Quentin.

For the next 20 years, Bunker would be in and out of prison for numerous felonies: robbery, battery, and check forgery, just to name a few. While in prison, he read the novel of another San Quentin inmate, Caryl Chessman, whose book, Cell 2455, Death Row, was a reveleation to Bunker, so he set about devoting himself to writing.

He enrolled in a correspondence course in freshman English from the University of California, and after several years of unpublished novels, he struck gold in 1973 with No Beast So Fierce. The novel, about a paroled thief whose attempt to reenter mainstream society fails, was as tough and unforgiving as anything ever written about a parolee's readjustment to the outside, and it rightfully earned Bunker acclaim as a writer to watch.

After he was released from prison in 1975, Bunker concentrated on writing and acting. His big film break happened when No Beast So Fierce was turned into the movie Straight Time (1978) starring Dustin Hoffman. He co-wrote the screenplay, and also had a small part as one of Hoffman's cronies.

Bunker's next big hit as a screenwriter and actor was Runaway Train (1985), a pulsating drama about two escaped convicts (Jon Voight and Eric Roberts) where again, he had a small role as Jonah. It was obvious by now that Bunker, with his gruff voice, unnerving gaze, broken nose, and his signature feature - a scar from a knife wound that ran from his forehead to his lip - would make a most enigmatic movie villian.

A few more roles in prominent pictures followed: The Running Man, Shy People (both 1987), Tango & Cash (1989), before he scored the best role of his career, Mr. Blue in Quentin Tarantino's celebrated cult caper Reservoir Dogs (1992). It couldn't have been easy for Bunker to hold his own in a cast of heavyweights (Harvey Keitel, Lawrence Tierney, Tim Roth and Steve Buscemi), but he did - and with a muscularly lithe style that was all his own.

After Reservoir Dogs, Bunker was in demand as a villian. His next few films: Distant Cousins (1993), Somebody to Love (1994), were routine, but he proved that he could deliver with professional, if familiar performances. Actor Steve Buscemi helped Bunker get his novel Animal Factory to the screen in 2000, with Bunker again adapting his own work for film. He was last seen as a convict, although with sharp comedic overtones, in the recent Adam Sandler farce The Longest Yard (2005). He is survived by his son, Brendan.

by Michael "Mitch" Toole
Edward Bunker (1933-2005)

Edward Bunker (1933-2005)

Edward Bunker, the tough, charismatic ex-convict who eventaully turned his life around and became a respected writer, (No Beast So Fierce) and actor (Resevoir Dogs), died in Burbank on July 19 after complications developed from a surgical procedure to improve circulation in his legs. He was 71. He was born on December 31, 1933 in Hollywood, California to a mother who was a chorus girl in a few Busby Berkely musicals, and a father who was a studio grip; two of the lesser positions in the Hollywood hierarchy. After his parents divorced when he was four, he spent the next several years in various foster homes and juvenile reform schools. By 14, he notched his first criminal conviction for burglery; at 17, he stabbed a youth prison guard; and by 19, he was considered so violent a felon, that he became the youngest inmate ever at San Quentin. For the next 20 years, Bunker would be in and out of prison for numerous felonies: robbery, battery, and check forgery, just to name a few. While in prison, he read the novel of another San Quentin inmate, Caryl Chessman, whose book, Cell 2455, Death Row, was a reveleation to Bunker, so he set about devoting himself to writing. He enrolled in a correspondence course in freshman English from the University of California, and after several years of unpublished novels, he struck gold in 1973 with No Beast So Fierce. The novel, about a paroled thief whose attempt to reenter mainstream society fails, was as tough and unforgiving as anything ever written about a parolee's readjustment to the outside, and it rightfully earned Bunker acclaim as a writer to watch. After he was released from prison in 1975, Bunker concentrated on writing and acting. His big film break happened when No Beast So Fierce was turned into the movie Straight Time (1978) starring Dustin Hoffman. He co-wrote the screenplay, and also had a small part as one of Hoffman's cronies. Bunker's next big hit as a screenwriter and actor was Runaway Train (1985), a pulsating drama about two escaped convicts (Jon Voight and Eric Roberts) where again, he had a small role as Jonah. It was obvious by now that Bunker, with his gruff voice, unnerving gaze, broken nose, and his signature feature - a scar from a knife wound that ran from his forehead to his lip - would make a most enigmatic movie villian. A few more roles in prominent pictures followed: The Running Man, Shy People (both 1987), Tango & Cash (1989), before he scored the best role of his career, Mr. Blue in Quentin Tarantino's celebrated cult caper Reservoir Dogs (1992). It couldn't have been easy for Bunker to hold his own in a cast of heavyweights (Harvey Keitel, Lawrence Tierney, Tim Roth and Steve Buscemi), but he did - and with a muscularly lithe style that was all his own. After Reservoir Dogs, Bunker was in demand as a villian. His next few films: Distant Cousins (1993), Somebody to Love (1994), were routine, but he proved that he could deliver with professional, if familiar performances. Actor Steve Buscemi helped Bunker get his novel Animal Factory to the screen in 2000, with Bunker again adapting his own work for film. He was last seen as a convict, although with sharp comedic overtones, in the recent Adam Sandler farce The Longest Yard (2005). He is survived by his son, Brendan. by Michael "Mitch" Toole

Michael Jeter, 1952-2003


Michael Jeter, the diminutive actor whose versatility in all mediums earned him numerous accolades and awards, was found dead on March 30 in his Hollywood Hills home. He was 50. The cause of death has not been determined, although in a 1997 interview for Entertainment Tonight Jeter did disclose he was HIV-positive.

Jeter was born on Aug. 26, 1952, in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. He began medical studies at Memphis State University, but soon discovered a love for the theater. After graduation, he pursued his career in earnest and moved to New York and worked as a law firm secretary until he found some stage work and his film debut in Milos Forman's adaptation of the musical Hair (1979).

Jeter spend the next decade landing mostly stage work and making occasional guest forays in popular television shows: Lou Grant, Night Court, and Designing Women, but his unique physical presence (a slight, 5'4" frame, premature balding, owlish features) made it difficult for him to land substantial parts. That all changed when Tommy Tune cast him in the Broadway hit Grand Hotel (1990) in the role of Otto Kringelin, a dying clerk enjoying a last fling in Berlin. Jeter's energetic performance earned him a Tony award and gave him a much higher profile to stake a claim in movies. The following year he made his strongest impression on film to date when he was cast in Terry Gilliam's (1991) delivering a moving performance as a homeless cabaret singer with AIDS.

He scored his biggest coup when he was cast the same year in the hit sitcom Evening Shade (1991-1994) as Herman Stiles, the wimpy assistant to Reynolds, who played a pro football player turned coach. He won an Emmy award in 1992 for that role and scored two more nominations by the end of the series run. Jeter would also get some good supporting parts in many films throughout the decade: Sister Act 2 (1993), a fun comic role as Whoopi Goldberg's sidekick Father Ignatius; Mouse Hunt (1997); The Green Mile (1999), his best film role as Eduard Delacroix, a condemned murderer who befriends a cellblock mouse; Jurassic Park III (2001); and Welcome to Collinwood (2002).

At the time of his death, Jeter was appearing on the classic PBS children's series Sesame Street as the lovable but bumbling Mr. Noodle; and had been filming Robert Zemekis' Christmas movie The Polar Express starring Tom Hanks. Production was halted on Monday in observance of Jeter's death. He is survived by his life partner, Sean Blue, his parents, Dr. William and Virginia Jeter; a brother, William; and four sisters, Virginia Anne Barham, Emily Jeter, Amanda Parsons and Laurie Wicker.

by Michael T. Toole

Michael Jeter, 1952-2003

Michael Jeter, the diminutive actor whose versatility in all mediums earned him numerous accolades and awards, was found dead on March 30 in his Hollywood Hills home. He was 50. The cause of death has not been determined, although in a 1997 interview for Entertainment Tonight Jeter did disclose he was HIV-positive. Jeter was born on Aug. 26, 1952, in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. He began medical studies at Memphis State University, but soon discovered a love for the theater. After graduation, he pursued his career in earnest and moved to New York and worked as a law firm secretary until he found some stage work and his film debut in Milos Forman's adaptation of the musical Hair (1979). Jeter spend the next decade landing mostly stage work and making occasional guest forays in popular television shows: Lou Grant, Night Court, and Designing Women, but his unique physical presence (a slight, 5'4" frame, premature balding, owlish features) made it difficult for him to land substantial parts. That all changed when Tommy Tune cast him in the Broadway hit Grand Hotel (1990) in the role of Otto Kringelin, a dying clerk enjoying a last fling in Berlin. Jeter's energetic performance earned him a Tony award and gave him a much higher profile to stake a claim in movies. The following year he made his strongest impression on film to date when he was cast in Terry Gilliam's

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter December 22, 1989

Released in United States on Video June 13, 1990

Albert Magnoli replaced Andrei Konchalovsky as director mid- way through filming, but Konchalovsky received full credit.

Completed shooting October 20, 1989.

Began shooting June 12, 1989.

John Matuszak was set to star, but died June 17, 1989 at the age of 38.

Released in United States Winter December 22, 1989

Released in United States on Video June 13, 1990