Summer Heat


1h 30m 1987

Film Details

MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Drama
Release Date
1987
Production Company
Arri Group; Atlantic; Cinema Research Corporation; Otto Nemenz International, Inc.
Location
Robersonville, North Carolina, USA; Tarboro, North Carolina, USA; Conetoe, North Carolina, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Synopsis

Crew

Dan Adams

Driver

Thomas Edward Andrews

Production Assistant

Gandhi Bob Arrollo

Makeup Design

Dwayne Avery

Sound Effects Editor Supervisor

Eric G Bartsch

Grip

Mary Bauer

Editor

Jan Bergstrom

Set Decorator

Charlotte Brsndstr÷m

Associate Editor

Ricky James Braswell

Driver

Boots Bruner

Casting (Extras)

Bert Caldwell

Production Assistant

David Caldwell

Sound Effects Editor

Samuel E Cannon

Security

Samuel E Cannon

Security

Kim Carnes

Song Performer ("The Heart Must Have A Home")

Larry Gene Cherry

Driver

Robert Eugene Cline

Set Dresser

Thomas Coleman

Executive Producer

Mike Cook

Sound Effects Editor

Danny Crisp

Driver

Battle Davis

Additional Editing

Bill Davis

Caterer

Elliot Davis

Director Of Photography

T W Davis

Sound Effects Editor

Georges Delerue

Music ("The Heart Must Have A Home")

Bennett Eason

Security

Ed Fassl

Sound Effects Editor

George Flynn

Craft Service

Anthony Forester

Transportation Coordinator

Dennis Fuller

Boom Operator

Kelly Gleason

Apprentice Editor

Kelly Gleason

Location Manager

Michie Gleason

Screenwriter

Frank Godwin

Production Assistant

Gregory Goodman

Unit Manager

Randy Green

Driver

Dwayne Greer

Hairstyles

Roy Gyongy

Title Design

Margaret S Hamilton

Security

Billy Wayne Harris

Transportation Captain

Rena Harris

Assistant (To Michie Gleason)

Frank Harrison

Mandolin Consultant

David Harshbarger

Property Master

Lee Haxall

Sound Mixer

Vivian Hengsteler

Negative Cutter

Jan Heyneker

Key Grip

Marcia Hinds-johnson

Production Designer

Andrea Horta

Adr Editor

Karen A Hughes

Other

Will Jennings

Lyrics ("The Heart Must Have A Home")

Nils C Jensen

Sound Effects Editor

Bo Johnson

Art Direction

Dudley Leigh Johnson

Set Decorator Assistant

Vivian Johnson

Driver

Adam Johnston

Sound Effects Editor

Alexander J Johnston

Production Assistant

Kelvin Jones

Stills

Linda Jones

Hairstyles

Wayne Jones

Stand-In

Brendan P Kelsh

Stand-In

Michael Kelsh

Mandolin Consultant

Clater Killebrew

Tobacco Consultant

Sharon Kirkpatrick

Script Supervisor

James Koford

Sound Effects Editor

Jane Kurson

Additional Editing

Robbie Lemons

Hairstyles

Ellen Levene

Publicist

Keith G Lewis

Costumer

Larry Litton

2nd Assistant Director

Beth Long

Hairstyles

Junie Lowry-johnson

Casting

Lee Lighting Ltd

Location Lighting

Lee Lighting Ltd

Grip Equipment

Barry Mann

Music ("The Heart Must Have A Home")

Tony Marando

Costume Designer

Monty Hayes Mcmillan

Electrician

Linda L Miller

Costume Assistant

David Moore

Set Dresser

Mary Ann Morgan

Other

Page Nelson

Special Stills

Christine M Norfleet

Stand-In

Tammy O'neal

Scenic Artist

Mitchell Osborne

Driver

Janet Petersen

Construction Supervisor Assistant

Lars Petersen

Construction Supervisor

Mark A Pollard

Security

Gene Poole

Dolly Grip

Calvin Earl Powell

Security

Donna Proctor

Scenic Artist

Larry Reibman

Gaffer

Christa Reusch-simmons

Makeup

Tony Rivetti

1st Assistant Camera

Lane Robinson

Security

Elliot Lewis Rosenblatt

1st Assistant Director

Michael Rosenblatt

Executive Producer

Barbara E Sasser

Other

Leonard Seagal

Electrician

Diane Seniw

Other

Louise Shivers

Source Material (From Novel)

Terry Snell

Carpenter

Fiona Spence

Costume Supervisor

Greg Stacy

Sound Effects Editor

Patricia A Stallone

Production Manager

Patricia A Stallone

Line Producer

Clyde Wilson Stalls

Set Dresser

Tony Stephens

Grip

Michael Stocks

Bestboy Grip

Richard Stone

Music

John Strong

Supervising Producer

Mike Taylor

Bestboy Electrician

Dr. Peter Temple

Mandolin Consultant

William Tennant

Producer

Louis Terry

On-Set Dresser

Gary W Tolby

Props Assistant

Gretchen Toma

Sound Editor Assistant

Steve Tyrell

Song Producer ("The Heart Must Have A Home")

Steve Tyrell

Music Supervisor

Thaddeus Wadleigh

2nd Assistant Camera

Howard Webb

Security

Michael D Weldon

1st Additional Assistant Camera

Ron Wengler

Color Timer

Michael Todd Wiggins

Security

Edward Williams

Security

Ken Wilson

Transportation Co-Captain

Rebekah E Wright

3rd Assistant Director

Jennifer Zolten

Production Auditor

Film Details

MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Drama
Release Date
1987
Production Company
Arri Group; Atlantic; Cinema Research Corporation; Otto Nemenz International, Inc.
Location
Robersonville, North Carolina, USA; Tarboro, North Carolina, USA; Conetoe, North Carolina, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Articles

Noble Willingham (1931-2004)


Noble Willingham, the gruffly voiced character actor best known for his role as saloon owner C.D. Parker on Chuck Norris' long-running series Walker, Texas Ranger, died of natural causes on January 17th at his Palm Springs home. He was 72.

Born on August 31, 1931 in Mineola, Texas, Willingham was educated at North Texas State University where he earned a degree in Economics. He later taught government and economics at a high school in Houston, leaving his life-long dreams of becoming an actor on hold until the opportunity presented itself. Such an opportunity happened when in late 1970, Peter Bogdonovich was doing some on-location shooting in south Texas for The Last Picture Show (1971); at the urging of some friends, he audition and won a small role in the picture. From there, Willingham slowly began to find work in some prominent films, including Bogdonovich's Paper Moon (1973), and Roman Polanski's Chinatown (1974). Around this time, Willingham kept busy with many guest appearances on a variety of popular shows: Bonanza, Gunsmoke, The Waltons, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, The Rockford Files and several others.

Critics didn't take notice of his acting abilities until he landed the role of Leroy Mason, the soulless plant manager who stares down Sally Field in Norma Rae (1979). Few could forget him screaming at her, "Lady, I want you off the premises now!" with unapologetic malice. It may have not been a likable character, but after this stint, better roles came along, most notably the corrupt Dr. Fenster in Robert Redford's prison drama Brubaker (1980); and the evil sheriff in the thriller The Howling (1981).

By the late '80s, Willingham was an in-demand character actor, and he scored in three hit films: a border patrol sergeant - a great straight man to Cheech Marin - in the ethnic comedy Born in East L.A.; his wonderfully avuncular performance as General Taylor, the military brass who was sympathetic to an unorthodox disc jockey in Saigon, played by Robin Williams in Good Morning, Vietnam (both 1987); and his good 'ole boy villainy in the Rutger Hauer action flick Blind Fury (1988). His performances in these films proved that if nothing else, Willingham was a solid backup player who was adept at both comedy and drama.

His best remembered role will no doubt be his six year run as the genial barkeep C.D. Parker opposite Chuck Norris in the popular adventure series Walker, Texas Ranger (1993-99). However, film reviewers raved over his tortured performance as a foul-mouthed, bigoted boat salesman who suffers a traffic downfall in the little seen, but searing indie drama The Corndog Man (1998); the role earned Willingham a nomination for Best Actor at the Independent Spirit Awards and it showed that this ably supporting performer had enough charisma and talent to hold his own in a lead role.

In 2000, Willingham tried his hand at politics when he unsuccessfully tried to unseat Democrat Max Dandlin in a congressional campaign in east Texas. After the experience, Willingham returned to acting filming Blind Horizon with Val Kilmer in 2003. The movie is to be released later this year. Willingham is survived by his wife, Patti Ross Willingham; a son, John Ross McGlohen; two daughters, Stari Willingham and Meghan McGlohen; and a grandson.

by Michael T. Toole
Noble Willingham (1931-2004)

Noble Willingham (1931-2004)

Noble Willingham, the gruffly voiced character actor best known for his role as saloon owner C.D. Parker on Chuck Norris' long-running series Walker, Texas Ranger, died of natural causes on January 17th at his Palm Springs home. He was 72. Born on August 31, 1931 in Mineola, Texas, Willingham was educated at North Texas State University where he earned a degree in Economics. He later taught government and economics at a high school in Houston, leaving his life-long dreams of becoming an actor on hold until the opportunity presented itself. Such an opportunity happened when in late 1970, Peter Bogdonovich was doing some on-location shooting in south Texas for The Last Picture Show (1971); at the urging of some friends, he audition and won a small role in the picture. From there, Willingham slowly began to find work in some prominent films, including Bogdonovich's Paper Moon (1973), and Roman Polanski's Chinatown (1974). Around this time, Willingham kept busy with many guest appearances on a variety of popular shows: Bonanza, Gunsmoke, The Waltons, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, The Rockford Files and several others. Critics didn't take notice of his acting abilities until he landed the role of Leroy Mason, the soulless plant manager who stares down Sally Field in Norma Rae (1979). Few could forget him screaming at her, "Lady, I want you off the premises now!" with unapologetic malice. It may have not been a likable character, but after this stint, better roles came along, most notably the corrupt Dr. Fenster in Robert Redford's prison drama Brubaker (1980); and the evil sheriff in the thriller The Howling (1981). By the late '80s, Willingham was an in-demand character actor, and he scored in three hit films: a border patrol sergeant - a great straight man to Cheech Marin - in the ethnic comedy Born in East L.A.; his wonderfully avuncular performance as General Taylor, the military brass who was sympathetic to an unorthodox disc jockey in Saigon, played by Robin Williams in Good Morning, Vietnam (both 1987); and his good 'ole boy villainy in the Rutger Hauer action flick Blind Fury (1988). His performances in these films proved that if nothing else, Willingham was a solid backup player who was adept at both comedy and drama. His best remembered role will no doubt be his six year run as the genial barkeep C.D. Parker opposite Chuck Norris in the popular adventure series Walker, Texas Ranger (1993-99). However, film reviewers raved over his tortured performance as a foul-mouthed, bigoted boat salesman who suffers a traffic downfall in the little seen, but searing indie drama The Corndog Man (1998); the role earned Willingham a nomination for Best Actor at the Independent Spirit Awards and it showed that this ably supporting performer had enough charisma and talent to hold his own in a lead role. In 2000, Willingham tried his hand at politics when he unsuccessfully tried to unseat Democrat Max Dandlin in a congressional campaign in east Texas. After the experience, Willingham returned to acting filming Blind Horizon with Val Kilmer in 2003. The movie is to be released later this year. Willingham is survived by his wife, Patti Ross Willingham; a son, John Ross McGlohen; two daughters, Stari Willingham and Meghan McGlohen; and a grandson. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer May 29, 1987

Shooting began September 1, 1986.

Released in United States Summer May 29, 1987