Stormy


1h 9m 1935

Film Details

Release Date
Nov 11, 1935
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Universal Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Stormy by Cherry Wilson (New York, 1929).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 9m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7 reels

Synopsis

Stormy, a stable boy working for race horse owner Mac, is responsible for the loss of Red Streak, his favorite horse. A year later, Stormy finds Red Streak and her colt, which has been fathered by a wild horse. At first Mac, believing that the colt is worthless, offers him to Stormy, but he later changes his mind when he learns that the Colorado wild stallions have Arabian blood. Mac is furious when he finds Stormy riding on the train carrying the horses back and throws him off the train. Rancher Trinidad Dorn finds Stormy and offers him a job working with his herd of wild horses, because he, like Stormy, is also horse-crazy. Trin's brother Deem does not share his love of horses and wants to sell them for their hides in order to turn the range over to cattle. He also disapproves of Stormy and refuses to allow his daughter Kerry to spend time with the boy. Trin, on the other hand, thinks of Stormy as the son he never had and tries to persuade him to stay on the ranch. After learning that the train carrying the horses was wrecked, Stormy looks for the two horses that escaped. Stormy cannot save the injured Red Streak, but takes the colt to a secret corral that he builds for him. Kerry discovers Stormy's secret and helps to train the horse. She even suggests that they name him Rex, because he is the "king" of the wild horses. Later, the cowboys discover Rex running with the wild horses and capture him. When Craig, the foreman, uses abuse to subdue the horse, Stormy fights him. Deem tries to take Rex away from Stormy, but Kerry and Trin defend his claim to the horse. During a party that night, Stormy frees Rex from the barn where Deem has stabled him. Craig follows them, but failing to catch Rex again, he brings Stormy to Deem for punishment. Deem and Trin quarrel over Stormy; Deem wants him banished from the ranch, while Trin wants to adopt the boy. Realizing that he will never control the ranch if Trin goes ahead with his plans, Deem then plots to kill Trin before the adoption can take place. Following Deem's instructions, his men wound Trin and leave him to die in the desert. Rex saves Trin from a rattlesnake attack and brings Stormy and Kerry to him. They hide Trin in the secret corral. Meanwhile, believing his brother to be dead, Deem sells the wild horses. When his men start to round them up, Trin realizes what is happening, and Kerry and Stormy set a fire, creating a stampede. Stormy tries to warn Deem of the approaching stampede, but the angry rancher shoots the boy. Too late, Deem realizes his danger. He falls from his horse and is crushed by the stampede. Trin's herd is now safe and Kerry and Stormy decide to set Rex free to run with the herd. Rex, however, chooses to remain with them.

Film Details

Release Date
Nov 11, 1935
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Universal Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Stormy by Cherry Wilson (New York, 1929).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 9m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The credits and synopsis were taken from a studio cutting continuity and contemporary reviews. According to the continuity, Murray Seldeen was the film editor, but Motion Picture Herald and the copyright catalog credit Saul Goodkind. According to an onscreen notation, the film was shot in the Painted Desert in Arizona, 112 miles from Flagstaff. An article in Lib, notes that the company commuted from Tuba City, 30 miles away. The desert heat reached 131 degrees, and a rattlesnake, imported for the film, died of the heat. News items in Daily Variety note that Navajo Indians rounded up about 1,000 wild horses from the Arizona area. Motion Picture Herald notes that The Arizona Wranglers were a singing hillbilly group who appeared on the radio. The songs performed during the film were not identified in the cutting continuity.