Sabrina


2h 7m 1995

Brief Synopsis

The daughter of a wealthy family's chauffeur leaves for Paris an ordinary girl, but returns a beautiful woman, much to the delight of the wealthy family's two sons.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Adaptation
Comedy
Romance
Romantic Comedy
Release Date
1995
Distribution Company
PARAMOUNT PICTURES/UNITED INTERNATIONAL PICTURES (UIP)
Location
Paris, France; Long Island, New York, USA; Paris, France; New York City, New York, USA; Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, USA; Paramount Studios, Hollywood, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 7m

Synopsis

The daughter of a wealthy family's chauffeur leaves for Paris an ordinary girl, but returns a beautiful woman, much to the delight of the wealthy family's two sons.

Crew

Noah Ackerman

Assistant

Sandrine Ageorges

Location Manager

Timothy J Alberts

Costume Supervisor

Tom Allen

Property Master

Mary Andrews

Adr Editor

Ray Angelic

Assistant Production Coordinator

Myles Aronowitz

Photography

Jean-pierre Avice

Production Manager

Benjamin Beardwood

Dialogue Editor

Barbara Benedek

Screenplay

Alan Bergman

Song

Marilyn Bergman

Song

Stephen G. Bishop

Hair Stylist

Christine Bodelot

Production Auditor

Jerome Borenstein

Assistant Director

Diana E Burton

Assistant Property Master

Joseph A Campayno

Makeup

Marcus Canty

Production Auditor

Joanny Carpentier

Production Coordinator

Dennis Causey

On-Set Dresser

Jack Coffen

Electrician

Alexandra Cohen

Production Assistant

Raymond Collins

Camera Trainee

Steve Comesky

Electrician

Cheryl E Compton

Other

O J Connell Iii

Other

Kathleen Corgan

Assistant Location Manager

Sandy De Crescent

Music Contractor

Bac Delorme

Production Assistant

George Detitta Jr.

Set Decorator

Gerald A Detitta

On-Set Dresser

Frank Didio

Foreman

Anthony J Dimeo

On-Set Dresser

Lindsay Doran

Executive Producer

Clarence B Douglas

Production Assistant

Kate Dowd

Casting

Dean Drabin

Foley Mixer

Gordon Driver

Graphics

Gordon Driver

Other

Joe Earle

Sound Effects Editor

Rochelle Edelson

Scenic Artist

Ann Edgeworth

Propman

Gina Edmond-feldman

Assistant

Jane Emanuel

Assistant

Gene Engels

Lighting Technician

Derek Evans

Assistant

Michael Finnerty

Grip

Giovanni Fiore Coltellacci

Camera Operator

Brian Fitzsimons

Grip

Raymond Fortune

Electrician

Julia Franz

Assistant

Charlie Fress

Grip

Dennis Gamiello

Grip

Alberte Garo

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Isabelle Gautier

Transportation Manager

Gilbert Gertsen

On-Set Dresser

Gordon H Gertsen

On-Set Dresser

Mitchell C Gettleman

Sound Effects Editor

Don Glenn

Grip

Wendy Goidell

Other

Meredith Gold

Assistant Sound Editor

Anamarie Gonzaga

Production Auditor

Gary Goodman

Assistant

Laura Graham

Adr Editor

Shawn Griffith

Production Assistant

Vincent Guarriello

Key Grip

Timothy Guiness

Electrician

Lynda Gurasich

Hair Stylist

Raul A Gutierrez

Assistant

Peter G Hackman

Construction

Ann Hadsell

Foley Recordist

Robert S Hahn

Director Of Photography

Brian Hamill

Photography

Steven R Hammond

Transportation Captain

Robin Harlan

Foley

Barbara Harris

Voice Casting

Thomas J Heilig

Transportation Co-Captain

Henfling

Production Assistant

William Hines

Electrician

Victor Huey

Grip

Jean-michel Hugon

Art Director

J Paul Huntsman

Sound Editor

Joseph Iberti

Location Manager

Thomas Imperato

Production Supervisor

Barbara Issak

Dialogue Editor

Adam Jenkins

Rerecording

Chris Jenkins

Rerecording

Trevor Jolly

Foley Editor

Gary Jones

Costume Designer

John Kasarda

Art Director

Bill Kaufman

Casting Associate

Mary A Kelly

Continuity

Katherine A Kennedy

Production Coordinator

Ronna Kress

Casting Associate

David B Leener

Production Associate

Nancy Lefkovitz

Production Assistant

Ernest Lehman

From Story

Gary Levitsky

On-Set Dresser

Jay Levy

Photography

Martin Lowry

Grip

Donna Maloney

Costume Supervisor

Peter A Mann

Video Assist/Playback

Brian R Mannain

Production

Lilene Mansell

Dialect Coach

Amy Marshall

Set Decorator

Brick Mason

Storyboard Artist

Michelle Matland

Assistant Costume Designer

Chris Mayback

Avid Editor

Bernadette Mazur

Makeup Artist

Anne Mccabe

Assistant Editor

Mary Jo Mcgrath

Production Assistant

Dennis Mcneill

Color Timer

Danny Michael

Sound Mixer

Scott Millan

Rerecording

Theresa Repola Mohammed

Negative Cutting

Sarah Monat

Foley

Richard Montgomery

Grip

Brian Morris

Production Designer

Wayne Moss

Carpenter

Fred Muller

Electrician

Shawn Murphy

Music

Myron Nettinga

Sound Effects Editor

John Neufeld

Original Music

Rebecca Nicolaou

Assistant Sound Editor

Phill Norman

Titles

Chris Norr

Photography

John Oates

On-Set Dresser

John E Oliver

Music

Donna Ostroff

Assistant

Richard Patrick

Assistant Director

Jeanine Payne

Assistant Sound Editor

Ron Petagna

Construction Coordinator

Marc Pinquier

Propman

Juliet Polcsa

Assistant Costume Designer

Amanda Pollack

Assistant Editor

Bernie Pollack

Costumes

Sydney Pollack

Producer

Joseph Proscia

On-Set Dresser

David Rayfiel

Screenplay

Michael Reichman

Dga Trainee

Thomas Reilly

Assistant Director

Peter Robb-king

Makeup

Jeff Rosen

Foley Editor

Ann Roth

Costume Designer

Giuseppe Rotunno

Director Of Photography

David Rubin

Casting

Scott Rudin

Producer

Pascal Salafa

Assistant Director

Adam Sawelson

Dialogue Editor

Miriam Schapiro

Art Department Coordinator

Andrew Schmetterling

Boom Operator

Jonathan Schwartz

Location Assistant

Ronald L Schwary

Executive Producer

Ronald L Schwary

Production Manager

John E Smith

Lighting

Peter Soldo

Production Assistant

Frederic Steinkamp

Editor

Karl Steinkamp

Assistant Editor

Robert Steinkamp

Assistant Editor

Robert Stocklin

Electrician

Todd A/o Studios

Sound

Liza Sullivan

Assistant Editor

Chap Taylor

Production Assistant

Samuel Taylor

Play As Source Material

Samuel Taylor

From Story

Heidi Topper

Assistant Location Manager

Susan Towner

Production Auditor

Philippe Turlure

On-Set Dresser

Carl Turpeinen

Wardrobe Assistant

Ron Von Blomberg

Other

Jennifer Wachtell

Assistant

Ken Wannberg

Music Editor

Peter Weireter

Consultant

Michael Wild

Liaison

Billy Wilder

From Story

John Williams

Music

John Williams

Song

John Williams

Music Conductor

Joseph Zolfo

Wardrobe Assistant

Film Details

MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Adaptation
Comedy
Romance
Romantic Comedy
Release Date
1995
Distribution Company
PARAMOUNT PICTURES/UNITED INTERNATIONAL PICTURES (UIP)
Location
Paris, France; Long Island, New York, USA; Paris, France; New York City, New York, USA; Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, USA; Paramount Studios, Hollywood, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 7m

Award Nominations

Best Score (Musical or Comedy)

1995

Best Song

1995

Articles

Ernest Lehman (1915-2005)


Ernest Lehman, the acclaimed screenwriter who did everything from stranding Cary Grant in a cornfield (North by Northwest) to seeing Julie Andrews help the Von Trap family escape the Nazis in (The Sound of Music) died on July 2 in Los Angeles following an undisclosed illness. He was 89.

Born on December 8, 1915 in New York City, Lehman graduated from New York's City College with a degree in English. After graduation he found work as a writer for many mediums: radio, theater, and popular magazines of the day like Collier's before landing his first story in Hollywood for the comedy, The Inside Story (1948). The success of that film didn't lead immediately to screenwriting some of Hollywood's biggest hits, but his persistancy to break into the silver screen paid off by the mid-'50s: the delicious Audrey Hepburn comedy Sabrina (1954, his first Oscar® nomination and first Golden Globe award); Paul Newman's first hit based on the life of Rocky Graziano Somebody Up There Likes Me; and his razor sharp expose of the publicity world based on his own experiences as an assistant for a theatre publicist The Sweet Smell of Success (1957).

Lehman's verasitily and gift for playful dialogue came to the fore for Alfred Hitchcock's memorable North by Northwes (1959, his second Oscar® nomination); and he showed a knack for moving potentially stiff Broadway fodder into swift cinematic fare with West Side Story (1961, a third Oscar® nomination); The Sound of Music (1965); Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966); and Hello, Dolly! (1969, the last two being his final Oscar® nominations for screenwriting).

Lehman took his turn as a director when he adapted Philip Roth's comic novel Portnoy's Complaint (1972) for film, and despite some good reviews, it wasn't a commercial hit. He wrote just two more screenplays before retiring: an underrated comic mystery gem for Hitchcock Family Plot (1976); and the big budget Robert Shaw espionage drama Black Sunday (1977). Lehman served as president of the Writers Guild of America from 1983-85. After going zero for five with his Oscar® nominations, the Academy made it up to him in 2001, by presenting him with an honorary Academy Award for his "body of varied and enduring work." Lehman is survived by his wife Laurie and three children.

by Michael T. Toole
Ernest Lehman (1915-2005)

Ernest Lehman (1915-2005)

Ernest Lehman, the acclaimed screenwriter who did everything from stranding Cary Grant in a cornfield (North by Northwest) to seeing Julie Andrews help the Von Trap family escape the Nazis in (The Sound of Music) died on July 2 in Los Angeles following an undisclosed illness. He was 89. Born on December 8, 1915 in New York City, Lehman graduated from New York's City College with a degree in English. After graduation he found work as a writer for many mediums: radio, theater, and popular magazines of the day like Collier's before landing his first story in Hollywood for the comedy, The Inside Story (1948). The success of that film didn't lead immediately to screenwriting some of Hollywood's biggest hits, but his persistancy to break into the silver screen paid off by the mid-'50s: the delicious Audrey Hepburn comedy Sabrina (1954, his first Oscar® nomination and first Golden Globe award); Paul Newman's first hit based on the life of Rocky Graziano Somebody Up There Likes Me; and his razor sharp expose of the publicity world based on his own experiences as an assistant for a theatre publicist The Sweet Smell of Success (1957). Lehman's verasitily and gift for playful dialogue came to the fore for Alfred Hitchcock's memorable North by Northwes (1959, his second Oscar® nomination); and he showed a knack for moving potentially stiff Broadway fodder into swift cinematic fare with West Side Story (1961, a third Oscar® nomination); The Sound of Music (1965); Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966); and Hello, Dolly! (1969, the last two being his final Oscar® nominations for screenwriting). Lehman took his turn as a director when he adapted Philip Roth's comic novel Portnoy's Complaint (1972) for film, and despite some good reviews, it wasn't a commercial hit. He wrote just two more screenplays before retiring: an underrated comic mystery gem for Hitchcock Family Plot (1976); and the big budget Robert Shaw espionage drama Black Sunday (1977). Lehman served as president of the Writers Guild of America from 1983-85. After going zero for five with his Oscar® nominations, the Academy made it up to him in 2001, by presenting him with an honorary Academy Award for his "body of varied and enduring work." Lehman is survived by his wife Laurie and three children. by Michael T. Toole

Richard Crenna, 1927-2002


Actor Richard Crenna, the versatile, highly respected character actor of television and film, died on December 17 of pancreatic cancer in Los Angeles. He was 75.

Born on November 30, 1927 in Los Angeles, California, Crenna was the son of a pharmacist father and a mother who managed a number of small hotels in the Los Angles area the family owned, where Crenna was raised. At the tender age of 11, he was encouraged by a teacher to audition for a radio show, "Boy Scout Jamboree" at the nearby KFI-AM radio studio. Little did he realize that it would be the start of a very long and prosperous career.

Crenna found steady radio work for the next several years, culminating in 1948 with his breakthrough role of the goofy, squeaky-voiced Walter Denton in the hit radio series Our Miss Brooks. Crenna carried the momentum of his success to television when he spent four more seasons as Walter on Our Miss Brooks (1952-1956). Almost immediately after the run of that show, Crenna scored another hit series as Luke McCoy in the rustic comedy The Real McCoys (1957-1963) co-starring Walter Brennan.

Although he had been acting in films since the early '50s Crenna roles didn't come to critical notice until the mid '60s, appearing in Robert Wise's acclaimed The Sand Pebbles (1966) as the stalwart gunboat captain co-starring Steve McQueen; Terence Young's intense thriller, Wait Until Dark (1967), as a criminal who terrorizes a blind Audrey Hepburn; and another Robert Wise film, the Gertrude Lawrence biopic Star! (1968) playing the high profile role of Richard Aldrich opposite Julie Andrews.

Crenna's profile slowed down in the '70s, despite a brief return to television comedy in Norman Lear's political satire All's Fair (1976-1977) with Bernadette Peters. That show may not have lasted long, but Crenna bounced back with a resurgence in the '80s with a string of hit character parts: Lawrence Kasden's stylish film noir Body Heat (1981), as Kathleen Turner's ill-fated husband; Ted Kotchoff's hit Rambo: First Blood (1982), as Colonel Samuel Trautman, Sylvester Stallone's former Commander; Gary Marshall's excellent coming-of-age tale The Flamingo Kid (1984), one of his best performances (for which he received a Golden Globe nomination) as a smooth, charismatic gin-rummy champ who takes Matt Dillon under his tutelage; and many other quality roles in theatrical and made for television movies.

At the time of his death, Crenna was a member of the Screen Actors Guild board of directors and had a recurring role in the hit CBS dramatic series Judging Amy. In addition to Penni, his wife of 47 years, Crenna is survived by a son, Richard, two daughters, Seana and Maria, and three granddaughters.

by Michael T. Toole

Richard Crenna, 1927-2002

Actor Richard Crenna, the versatile, highly respected character actor of television and film, died on December 17 of pancreatic cancer in Los Angeles. He was 75. Born on November 30, 1927 in Los Angeles, California, Crenna was the son of a pharmacist father and a mother who managed a number of small hotels in the Los Angles area the family owned, where Crenna was raised. At the tender age of 11, he was encouraged by a teacher to audition for a radio show, "Boy Scout Jamboree" at the nearby KFI-AM radio studio. Little did he realize that it would be the start of a very long and prosperous career. Crenna found steady radio work for the next several years, culminating in 1948 with his breakthrough role of the goofy, squeaky-voiced Walter Denton in the hit radio series Our Miss Brooks. Crenna carried the momentum of his success to television when he spent four more seasons as Walter on Our Miss Brooks (1952-1956). Almost immediately after the run of that show, Crenna scored another hit series as Luke McCoy in the rustic comedy The Real McCoys (1957-1963) co-starring Walter Brennan. Although he had been acting in films since the early '50s Crenna roles didn't come to critical notice until the mid '60s, appearing in Robert Wise's acclaimed The Sand Pebbles (1966) as the stalwart gunboat captain co-starring Steve McQueen; Terence Young's intense thriller, Wait Until Dark (1967), as a criminal who terrorizes a blind Audrey Hepburn; and another Robert Wise film, the Gertrude Lawrence biopic Star! (1968) playing the high profile role of Richard Aldrich opposite Julie Andrews. Crenna's profile slowed down in the '70s, despite a brief return to television comedy in Norman Lear's political satire All's Fair (1976-1977) with Bernadette Peters. That show may not have lasted long, but Crenna bounced back with a resurgence in the '80s with a string of hit character parts: Lawrence Kasden's stylish film noir Body Heat (1981), as Kathleen Turner's ill-fated husband; Ted Kotchoff's hit Rambo: First Blood (1982), as Colonel Samuel Trautman, Sylvester Stallone's former Commander; Gary Marshall's excellent coming-of-age tale The Flamingo Kid (1984), one of his best performances (for which he received a Golden Globe nomination) as a smooth, charismatic gin-rummy champ who takes Matt Dillon under his tutelage; and many other quality roles in theatrical and made for television movies. At the time of his death, Crenna was a member of the Screen Actors Guild board of directors and had a recurring role in the hit CBS dramatic series Judging Amy. In addition to Penni, his wife of 47 years, Crenna is survived by a son, Richard, two daughters, Seana and Maria, and three granddaughters. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter December 15, 1995

Released in United States on Video June 11, 1996

Remake of "Sabrina" (USA/1954), directed by Billy Wilder and starring Humphrey Bogart, Audrey Hepburn and William Holden.

Completed shooting June 21, 1995.

Began shooting January 30, 1995.

Released in United States Winter December 15, 1995

Released in United States on Video June 11, 1996

Winner of the 1995 award for Most Promising Actor (Greg Kinnear) from the Chicago Film Critics Association.