Murderers' Row


1h 48m 1966
Murderers' Row

Brief Synopsis

Secret Agent Matt Helm must recover a stolen 'helio-beam' with the power to destroy the earth.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Crime
Mystery
Thriller
Spy
Adaptation
Sequel
Release Date
Dec 1, 1966
Premiere Information
Chicago opening: 20 Dec 1966
Production Company
Meadway-Claude Productions #2
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Murderers' Row by Donald Hamilton (New York, 1962).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 48m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color

Synopsis

As part of his plan for world conquest, archvillain Julian Wall has kidnaped Dr. Norman Solaris, the inventor of a helio-beam, a device capable of destroying the earth by harnessing the sun's rays. Wall has also eliminated most of America's ICE (Intelligence and Counter-Espionage) agents, including the famous Matt Helm. Unknown to him, however, the ever-resourceful Helm is alive and traveling incognito. Arriving on the Riviera, Matt finds his contact woman murdered, but he meets Solaris' daughter, Suzie, who is worried about her father's disappearance. Matt poses as an American gunman on the lam; and Wall hires him but becomes suspicious when Matt rescues Suzie from being killed by one of Wall's henchmen. Matt and Suzie escape and make their way to Wall's island stronghold. After numerous misadventures, they rescue Dr. Solaris and destroy Wall and his gang, thereby preventing the imminent destruction of Washington, D. C., by the helio-beam.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Crime
Mystery
Thriller
Spy
Adaptation
Sequel
Release Date
Dec 1, 1966
Premiere Information
Chicago opening: 20 Dec 1966
Production Company
Meadway-Claude Productions #2
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Murderers' Row by Donald Hamilton (New York, 1962).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 48m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color

Articles

Murderers' Row


Cinema's supreme secret agent, James Bond, jumped from Ian Fleming's novels to the theatrical screen in 1962, when Terence Young's good-humored thriller Dr. No launched one of the mightiest franchises in the history of film, and maybe the history of the cosmos. By the time Young's Thunderball rolled around in 1965, marking Sean Connery's fourth appearance in the role, the Hollywood imitation game had begun, generating spinoffs and preposterously titled parodies like Ralph Thomas's Agent 8¾ (1964) and Norman Taurog's Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine (1965), which helped pave the way for Jay Roach's Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery in the distant future of 1997.

Some early Bond knockoffs tried to be more than mere spoofs, and when 007 took a year off between Thunderball and Lewis Gilbert's You Only Live Twice (1967), a marginally original new series stepped up to fill the gap. The hero was Matt Helm, suavely played by Dean Martin, and although Helm's career never made it past four movies - the last was Phil Karlson's The Wrecking Crew (1968), a title signaling the fate of the franchise - it made a splash while it lasted. And it may eventually have repaid its debt to Bond by influencing his franchise, which acquired a more jocular tone when Roger Moore took over from Connery starting with Guy Hamilton's Live and Let Die(1973).

Henry Levin's Murderers' Row (1966), the second Helm movie, gamely tries to offer excitement and suspense along with the laughs, wisecracks, and miniskirts that audiences expected from pictures like this. It also shines a well-deserved spotlight on Ann-Margret, who starred in no fewer than four movies that year. Her teamwork with Martin helps explain why Murderers' Row became the eleventh highest-grossing picture of 1966.

Like many Bond thrillers, Murderers' Row has a science-fiction flavor. The first shot is a standard aerial view of Washington, D.C., but there's an odd streak of light extending faintly across the screen. The streak gets brighter and weirder, and then kaboom! The nation's capital is a smoldering wreck, apparently blasted to smithereens by a futuristic ray. The camera pulls back to reveal what actually happened: the city was just a model, but it really was destroyed by the ray, which is a prototype for the heliobeam, the ultimate weapon of mass destruction. In the wrong hands it could end civilization as we know it.

And naturally it's in the wrong hands - the hands of BIG O, alias the Bureau of International Government and Order, an organization dedicated to attaining that old favorite, world domination. The first step in their scheme calls for killing all the operatives of Intelligence Counter Espionage, or ICE, very much including Helm, who fakes his own death with help from ICE chief MacDonald (James Gregory) - note the initial M, another borrowing from Bond - and poses as a traveling postcard salesman to disguise his hunt for Dr. Norman Solaris (Richard Eastham), who invented the nasty ray. Ann-Margret plays Solaris's perky daughter, Suzie, so we know he can't truly be a bad guy. Other characters include Julian Wall (Karl Malden), who runs the assassination team, and Coco Duquette (Camilla Sparv), his super-sophisticated companion. Also on hand in a dancing scene is a pop-music trio played by Dino, Desi, & Billy, two of whom are sons of Dean Martin and TV star Desi Arnaz.

Every secret-agent fantasy thrives on secret weapons, and Murderers' Row has more than one. The biggie is the heliobeam wielded by the villains, but Helm makes surprisingly good use of a gadget Bond would have snickered at - a delayed-action gun that fires ten seconds after you pull the trigger. This flummoxes foes who get hold of it, wonder why it didn't shoot, and peer down the barrel just as it finally goes off. Fools them every time. Also in the picture are pint-size bombs that pack a huge explosive wallop. In one of the movie's showbiz jokes, Matt shows up just in time to grab one that's been pinned onto Suzy at a nightclub, and it detonates a nanosecond after he throws at the wall - which happens to be decorated with a picture of Frank Sinatra, one of Dean Martin's cronies in the famous Rat Pack group. "Sorry, Frank," mutters our hero as he escorts Suzy out of the wreckage.

Martin was known to audiences as a crooner and comic actor with a relaxed style and a taste for booze. He became a star as the genteel half of the legendary Dean Martin & Jerry Lewis comedy team, and from then on he usually played characters who resembled his own persona, such as the drunken Dude in Howard Hawks's Rio Bravo (1959) and the drunken Dino in Billy Wilder's Kiss Me, Stupid (1964), two of his most memorable roles. Helm was clearly engineered to his specifications, as was the series in general.

The movies are loosely based on books by Donald Hamilton, who published more than two dozen Matt Helm novels between 1960 and 1993, taking a darker, grittier approach than the films they inspired. Fans loved the playful nature of the screen versions, though, turning Karlson's The Silencers (1966) and Levin's The Ambushers (1967) as well as Murderers' Row into box-office bonanzas. The Wrecking Crew closes with a teaser for a fifth installment, "The Ravagers," but it wasn't made because Martin opted out, foreseeing a decline in the franchise's profitability. Helm's only subsequent appearances were in a short-lived ABC-TV show in the 1970s, starring Anthony Franciosa.

Ann-Margret was perfect for the Helm series, which (taking another cue from the Bond pictures) featured a different female star each time; among them were Stella Stevens, Elke Sommer, Cyd Charisse, Nancy Kwan, Tina Louise, and Sharon Tate in her next-to-last appearance before her tragic murder in 1969. Malden has a relatively small role in Murderers' Row, but he was a distinguished veteran of classics like Elia Kazan's A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) and On the Waterfront (1954). He and the rest of the cast appear to enjoy their material despite - or because of - its considerable silliness.

You know Murderers' Row is a quintessential product of the 1960s as soon as Helm ambles in wearing a leisure outfit that looks like a pair of Hugh Hefner's pajamas. And notice how the camera goes all psychedelic and prismatic in a dancing scene, taking an insect's-eye view that anticipates Michael Wadleigh's trippy Woodstock (1970). The production's special effects aren't very special - they're quite clunky, in fact - but director Levin takes steady advantage of Monte Carlo and the French Riviera, where the action was shot. Keep your mood as relaxed as Matt's, keep your eyes on the glamorous backgrounds, keep your ears attuned to Lalo Schifrin's sugary music, and you'll have a pretty good time.

Director: Henry Levin
Producer: Irving Allen
Screenplay: Herbert Baker, based on Donald Hamilton's novel
Cinematographer: Sam Leavitt
Film Editing: Walter Thompson
Art Direction: Joe Wright
Music: Lalo Schifrin
C-105m.

by David Sterritt
Murderers' Row

Murderers' Row

Cinema's supreme secret agent, James Bond, jumped from Ian Fleming's novels to the theatrical screen in 1962, when Terence Young's good-humored thriller Dr. No launched one of the mightiest franchises in the history of film, and maybe the history of the cosmos. By the time Young's Thunderball rolled around in 1965, marking Sean Connery's fourth appearance in the role, the Hollywood imitation game had begun, generating spinoffs and preposterously titled parodies like Ralph Thomas's Agent 8¾ (1964) and Norman Taurog's Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine (1965), which helped pave the way for Jay Roach's Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery in the distant future of 1997. Some early Bond knockoffs tried to be more than mere spoofs, and when 007 took a year off between Thunderball and Lewis Gilbert's You Only Live Twice (1967), a marginally original new series stepped up to fill the gap. The hero was Matt Helm, suavely played by Dean Martin, and although Helm's career never made it past four movies - the last was Phil Karlson's The Wrecking Crew (1968), a title signaling the fate of the franchise - it made a splash while it lasted. And it may eventually have repaid its debt to Bond by influencing his franchise, which acquired a more jocular tone when Roger Moore took over from Connery starting with Guy Hamilton's Live and Let Die(1973). Henry Levin's Murderers' Row (1966), the second Helm movie, gamely tries to offer excitement and suspense along with the laughs, wisecracks, and miniskirts that audiences expected from pictures like this. It also shines a well-deserved spotlight on Ann-Margret, who starred in no fewer than four movies that year. Her teamwork with Martin helps explain why Murderers' Row became the eleventh highest-grossing picture of 1966. Like many Bond thrillers, Murderers' Row has a science-fiction flavor. The first shot is a standard aerial view of Washington, D.C., but there's an odd streak of light extending faintly across the screen. The streak gets brighter and weirder, and then kaboom! The nation's capital is a smoldering wreck, apparently blasted to smithereens by a futuristic ray. The camera pulls back to reveal what actually happened: the city was just a model, but it really was destroyed by the ray, which is a prototype for the heliobeam, the ultimate weapon of mass destruction. In the wrong hands it could end civilization as we know it. And naturally it's in the wrong hands - the hands of BIG O, alias the Bureau of International Government and Order, an organization dedicated to attaining that old favorite, world domination. The first step in their scheme calls for killing all the operatives of Intelligence Counter Espionage, or ICE, very much including Helm, who fakes his own death with help from ICE chief MacDonald (James Gregory) - note the initial M, another borrowing from Bond - and poses as a traveling postcard salesman to disguise his hunt for Dr. Norman Solaris (Richard Eastham), who invented the nasty ray. Ann-Margret plays Solaris's perky daughter, Suzie, so we know he can't truly be a bad guy. Other characters include Julian Wall (Karl Malden), who runs the assassination team, and Coco Duquette (Camilla Sparv), his super-sophisticated companion. Also on hand in a dancing scene is a pop-music trio played by Dino, Desi, & Billy, two of whom are sons of Dean Martin and TV star Desi Arnaz. Every secret-agent fantasy thrives on secret weapons, and Murderers' Row has more than one. The biggie is the heliobeam wielded by the villains, but Helm makes surprisingly good use of a gadget Bond would have snickered at - a delayed-action gun that fires ten seconds after you pull the trigger. This flummoxes foes who get hold of it, wonder why it didn't shoot, and peer down the barrel just as it finally goes off. Fools them every time. Also in the picture are pint-size bombs that pack a huge explosive wallop. In one of the movie's showbiz jokes, Matt shows up just in time to grab one that's been pinned onto Suzy at a nightclub, and it detonates a nanosecond after he throws at the wall - which happens to be decorated with a picture of Frank Sinatra, one of Dean Martin's cronies in the famous Rat Pack group. "Sorry, Frank," mutters our hero as he escorts Suzy out of the wreckage. Martin was known to audiences as a crooner and comic actor with a relaxed style and a taste for booze. He became a star as the genteel half of the legendary Dean Martin & Jerry Lewis comedy team, and from then on he usually played characters who resembled his own persona, such as the drunken Dude in Howard Hawks's Rio Bravo (1959) and the drunken Dino in Billy Wilder's Kiss Me, Stupid (1964), two of his most memorable roles. Helm was clearly engineered to his specifications, as was the series in general. The movies are loosely based on books by Donald Hamilton, who published more than two dozen Matt Helm novels between 1960 and 1993, taking a darker, grittier approach than the films they inspired. Fans loved the playful nature of the screen versions, though, turning Karlson's The Silencers (1966) and Levin's The Ambushers (1967) as well as Murderers' Row into box-office bonanzas. The Wrecking Crew closes with a teaser for a fifth installment, "The Ravagers," but it wasn't made because Martin opted out, foreseeing a decline in the franchise's profitability. Helm's only subsequent appearances were in a short-lived ABC-TV show in the 1970s, starring Anthony Franciosa. Ann-Margret was perfect for the Helm series, which (taking another cue from the Bond pictures) featured a different female star each time; among them were Stella Stevens, Elke Sommer, Cyd Charisse, Nancy Kwan, Tina Louise, and Sharon Tate in her next-to-last appearance before her tragic murder in 1969. Malden has a relatively small role in Murderers' Row, but he was a distinguished veteran of classics like Elia Kazan's A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) and On the Waterfront (1954). He and the rest of the cast appear to enjoy their material despite - or because of - its considerable silliness. You know Murderers' Row is a quintessential product of the 1960s as soon as Helm ambles in wearing a leisure outfit that looks like a pair of Hugh Hefner's pajamas. And notice how the camera goes all psychedelic and prismatic in a dancing scene, taking an insect's-eye view that anticipates Michael Wadleigh's trippy Woodstock (1970). The production's special effects aren't very special - they're quite clunky, in fact - but director Levin takes steady advantage of Monte Carlo and the French Riviera, where the action was shot. Keep your mood as relaxed as Matt's, keep your eyes on the glamorous backgrounds, keep your ears attuned to Lalo Schifrin's sugary music, and you'll have a pretty good time. Director: Henry Levin Producer: Irving Allen Screenplay: Herbert Baker, based on Donald Hamilton's novel Cinematographer: Sam Leavitt Film Editing: Walter Thompson Art Direction: Joe Wright Music: Lalo Schifrin C-105m. by David Sterritt

Murderers' Row


The success of the James Bond franchise in the early sixties spawned an abundance of spy spoofs that included Casino Royale< (1967), Our Man Flint (1965), Modesty Blaise (1966) (based on a popular comic strip about the curvaceous female spy) and a series of films starring Dean Martin as Matt Helm, a retired espionage agent called back into service by a secret government agency.

Intended as America's answer to 007, Helm was the creation of novelist Donald Hamilton, who, in the book, was a ruthless, no-nonsense assassin. In Martin's hands, however, the role became the prototype for Mike Myers' character in the recent Austin Powers films - except that Martin had genuine sex appeal. In all of the Matt Helm films, Martin is shadowed by the bodaciously wicked "Slaygirls" and there is an obvious but intentional camp aspect that is entirely missing in Hamilton's novels.

In 1966, when Dean Martin filmed the first Matt Helm picture, The Silencers, he was at the pinnacle of his television career with the The Dean Martin Show. Although his TV variety show was a hit and made Martin the highest-paid television star at the time, the actor/singer wanted to resume his movie career. Enter Irving Allen, an independent producer, who once worked with Albert R. "Cubby" Broccoli, the producer of the James Bond films. Unfortunately for Allen, he had parted company with Broccoli over a disagreement about the value of making a series of films based on the Ian Fleming character. But after seeing the box office returns of Dr. No (1962), Allen decided to option the Matt Helm character for a film series and tapped Dean Martin to portray the swinging secret agent. The Silencers performed well at the box office and Murderers' Row (1966) was quickly put into production as the next installment in the series.

Martin returned for the title role, starring opposite Ann-Margret as Suzie Solaris. At the time, the Swedish-born starlet was in the midst of a thriving film career, having already been featured in a remake of State Fair (1962) and Viva Las Vegas (1964) with Elvis Presley. The villain of the piece is Karl Malden as the evil Julian Wall, who kidnaps Suzie's father, Dr. Norman Solaris, inventor of a helio-beam that could potentially destroy Earth. Naturally, Matt and Suzie team up to rescue her father and save the world from destruction.

Murderers' Row had some interesting personal ties for Dean Martin. Screenwriter Herbert Baker had worked on one of the bigger Jerry Lewis-Dean Martin comedies, Artists and Models (1955). And Martin's son, Dino, Jr., heads up the musical trio in the film - Dino, Desi and Billy - performing the pop song, "If You're Thinking, What I'm Thinking." The highlight of the film, however, might be the wild discotheque sequence with Ann-Margret dancing like a woman possessed while unaware that inside her dress is a tiny bomb ready to explode. Luckily, Helm saves the day - by removing and discarding her dress in one expert snatch. Campy, lightweight fun, Murderers' Row was popular enough to spawn two additional Matt Helm vehicles, also starring Martin: The Ambushers (1967) and The Wrecking Crew (1969). Now, films like Murderers' Row are being plundered for their style, sense of fun and sight gags by Hollywood studios hoping to cash in on the popular Austin Powers series; DreamWorks recently optioned a series of 27 Matt Helm novels from the original creator, Donald Hamilton.

Producer: Irving Allen
Director: Henry Levin
Screenplay: Harbert Baker, based on the novel by Donald Hamilton
Production Design: George R. Nelson
Cinematography: Sam Leavitt
Costume Design: Moss Mabry
Film Editing: Walter Thompson
Original Music: Lalo Schifrin
Cast: Dean Martin (Matt Helm), Ann-Margret (Suzie Solaris), Karl Malden (Julian Wall), Camilla Sparv (Coco Duquette), James Gregory (MacDonald), Beverly Adams (Lovey Kravezit), Richard Eastham (Dr. Norman Solaris).
C-107m. Letterboxed.

by Genevieve McGillicuddy

Murderers' Row

The success of the James Bond franchise in the early sixties spawned an abundance of spy spoofs that included Casino Royale< (1967), Our Man Flint (1965), Modesty Blaise (1966) (based on a popular comic strip about the curvaceous female spy) and a series of films starring Dean Martin as Matt Helm, a retired espionage agent called back into service by a secret government agency. Intended as America's answer to 007, Helm was the creation of novelist Donald Hamilton, who, in the book, was a ruthless, no-nonsense assassin. In Martin's hands, however, the role became the prototype for Mike Myers' character in the recent Austin Powers films - except that Martin had genuine sex appeal. In all of the Matt Helm films, Martin is shadowed by the bodaciously wicked "Slaygirls" and there is an obvious but intentional camp aspect that is entirely missing in Hamilton's novels. In 1966, when Dean Martin filmed the first Matt Helm picture, The Silencers, he was at the pinnacle of his television career with the The Dean Martin Show. Although his TV variety show was a hit and made Martin the highest-paid television star at the time, the actor/singer wanted to resume his movie career. Enter Irving Allen, an independent producer, who once worked with Albert R. "Cubby" Broccoli, the producer of the James Bond films. Unfortunately for Allen, he had parted company with Broccoli over a disagreement about the value of making a series of films based on the Ian Fleming character. But after seeing the box office returns of Dr. No (1962), Allen decided to option the Matt Helm character for a film series and tapped Dean Martin to portray the swinging secret agent. The Silencers performed well at the box office and Murderers' Row (1966) was quickly put into production as the next installment in the series. Martin returned for the title role, starring opposite Ann-Margret as Suzie Solaris. At the time, the Swedish-born starlet was in the midst of a thriving film career, having already been featured in a remake of State Fair (1962) and Viva Las Vegas (1964) with Elvis Presley. The villain of the piece is Karl Malden as the evil Julian Wall, who kidnaps Suzie's father, Dr. Norman Solaris, inventor of a helio-beam that could potentially destroy Earth. Naturally, Matt and Suzie team up to rescue her father and save the world from destruction. Murderers' Row had some interesting personal ties for Dean Martin. Screenwriter Herbert Baker had worked on one of the bigger Jerry Lewis-Dean Martin comedies, Artists and Models (1955). And Martin's son, Dino, Jr., heads up the musical trio in the film - Dino, Desi and Billy - performing the pop song, "If You're Thinking, What I'm Thinking." The highlight of the film, however, might be the wild discotheque sequence with Ann-Margret dancing like a woman possessed while unaware that inside her dress is a tiny bomb ready to explode. Luckily, Helm saves the day - by removing and discarding her dress in one expert snatch. Campy, lightweight fun, Murderers' Row was popular enough to spawn two additional Matt Helm vehicles, also starring Martin: The Ambushers (1967) and The Wrecking Crew (1969). Now, films like Murderers' Row are being plundered for their style, sense of fun and sight gags by Hollywood studios hoping to cash in on the popular Austin Powers series; DreamWorks recently optioned a series of 27 Matt Helm novels from the original creator, Donald Hamilton. Producer: Irving Allen Director: Henry Levin Screenplay: Harbert Baker, based on the novel by Donald Hamilton Production Design: George R. Nelson Cinematography: Sam Leavitt Costume Design: Moss Mabry Film Editing: Walter Thompson Original Music: Lalo Schifrin Cast: Dean Martin (Matt Helm), Ann-Margret (Suzie Solaris), Karl Malden (Julian Wall), Camilla Sparv (Coco Duquette), James Gregory (MacDonald), Beverly Adams (Lovey Kravezit), Richard Eastham (Dr. Norman Solaris). C-107m. Letterboxed. by Genevieve McGillicuddy

Matt Helm Lounge Set - The Matt Helm Lounge Box Set on DVD


By 1966 the James Bond franchise had already enjoyed four straight box-office hits, so it was probably inevitable that the suave, unstoppable British agent and lady's man would be satirized. The year would see not one, but two major film spoofs: the sprightly In Like Flint starring James Coburn, and the far inferior. The Silencers, starring Dean Martin as American agent Matt Helm. Amazingly, the lackluster Helm film would spawn three sequels of its own. The four films a now collected together in Sony's new value priced set Matt Helm Lounge.

Helm works for a government agency known as I.C.E. (Intelligence and Counter Espionage), the American equivalent of MI-5, though he only works on the rare occasion that the agency can get him to set aside his extracurricular activities: drinking, womanizing, and lounging in a circular bed that will, at the click of a button, glide forward and dump him into an indoor pool.

The first film in the series, The Silencers, finds Helm called out of "retirement" by I.C.E. chief MacDonald (James Gregory of Barney Miller) to track down the head of the evil "Big O" (Bureau of International Government and Order). Big O is lead by Tung-Tze (Victor Buono), who has stolen the timetables for the U.S. Government's underground nuclear tests and plans instigate "Operation Fallout," in which he will use a device of his own design to amplify the blasts and set off World War III! With the help of fellow-agent and certified klutz Gail Hendrix (Stella Stevens), Helm races to stop Tung-Tze before he destroys the world.

Murderers' Row has Helm on the track of a kidnapped inventor Norman Solaris (Richard Eastham), who has created a death ray that can incinerate an entire city. The trail leads to Blofeld-wannabe Julian Wall (Karl Malden), who intends to use the ray to wipe out Washington, D.C. With the help of Solaris' groovy go-go dancing daughter Suzie (Ann-Margaret), Helm infiltrates Wall's remote hideaway to free the doctor and stop Wall. In The Ambushers, yet another criminal mastermind is on hand to steal America's newest superweapon, which just happens to be a flying saucer. Along with sexy fellow agent Sheila Sommers (Janice Rule), Helm fights to retrieve the saucer from evil overlord Leopold Caselius (Albert Salmi) and femme-fatale Francesca Madeiros (Senta Berger), who comes equipped with drugged lipstick.

The last film in the series, The Wrecking Crew, features Nigel Green as Count Massimo Contini, another criminal mastermind who has successfully stolen a trainload of gold bullion, leaving the U.S. and England on the brink of economic collapse. Along with gorgeous but accident prone agent Freya Carlson (Sharon Tate), Helm is dispatched to attempt to retrieve the gold,. Fully aware of Helm's proclivities, Contini sends out two beautiful accomplices, Linka Karensky (Elke Sommer) and Wen Yu-Rang (Nancy Kwan), to get rid of him.

The Matt Helm series is a bewildering quartet of films for the time in which they were made: with the British invasion already having transformed the music industry virtually overnight, and the country rocked by social upheaval as American youth rebelled against the social order, Martin and his Rat Pack cronies were becoming increasingly anachronistic. While buddy Frank Sinatra was attempting to turn back the clock with his "Tony Rome" films (Tony Rome, Lady in Cement), which at least had the courage of their convictions, the Matt Helm films try to meld the Pack's cool, gin-soaked personae with the youth-oriented "mod" world. The result is something like putting Olivia Newton John and Gene Kelly together in Xanadu. The only possible appeal was to the quickly dwindling backyard luau crowd, who had long since worn out their copies of Arthur Lyman's Taboo.

Martin, who was capable of some fine acting, tried here to bring the same lackadaisical, laid-back charm to the big screen that audiences were enjoying on his popular weekly television variety show, produced at the same time as these films: but what worked so well on the small screen is disastrous on the big screen, particularly in a genre that requires a more high-wattage performance to make it funny. Martin sleep-walks through the films as if he were laying back on his television couch and crooning a chorus of "Welcome to My World."

And the passage of time has been even less kind to the series: at a distance of forty years what little charm the films had to 60s audiences has long since been forgotten. The best of the lot is The Silencers, mainly due to Stella Stevens' hilarious performance as the goofy Hendrix. Janice Rule nearly steals The Ambushers from Martin, if for no other reason than that she appears to have been awake during the filming; and the underrated Elke Sommer seems to be the only one of the bunch with a full grasp of what kind of film she's in.

In the end, the best that can be said about the Mat Helm series is that they are marginally better than the Salt & Pepper films.

For more information about Matt Helm Lounge, visit Sony Pictures. To order Matt Helm Lounge, go to TCM Shopping.

by Fred Hunter

Matt Helm Lounge Set - The Matt Helm Lounge Box Set on DVD

By 1966 the James Bond franchise had already enjoyed four straight box-office hits, so it was probably inevitable that the suave, unstoppable British agent and lady's man would be satirized. The year would see not one, but two major film spoofs: the sprightly In Like Flint starring James Coburn, and the far inferior. The Silencers, starring Dean Martin as American agent Matt Helm. Amazingly, the lackluster Helm film would spawn three sequels of its own. The four films a now collected together in Sony's new value priced set Matt Helm Lounge. Helm works for a government agency known as I.C.E. (Intelligence and Counter Espionage), the American equivalent of MI-5, though he only works on the rare occasion that the agency can get him to set aside his extracurricular activities: drinking, womanizing, and lounging in a circular bed that will, at the click of a button, glide forward and dump him into an indoor pool. The first film in the series, The Silencers, finds Helm called out of "retirement" by I.C.E. chief MacDonald (James Gregory of Barney Miller) to track down the head of the evil "Big O" (Bureau of International Government and Order). Big O is lead by Tung-Tze (Victor Buono), who has stolen the timetables for the U.S. Government's underground nuclear tests and plans instigate "Operation Fallout," in which he will use a device of his own design to amplify the blasts and set off World War III! With the help of fellow-agent and certified klutz Gail Hendrix (Stella Stevens), Helm races to stop Tung-Tze before he destroys the world. Murderers' Row has Helm on the track of a kidnapped inventor Norman Solaris (Richard Eastham), who has created a death ray that can incinerate an entire city. The trail leads to Blofeld-wannabe Julian Wall (Karl Malden), who intends to use the ray to wipe out Washington, D.C. With the help of Solaris' groovy go-go dancing daughter Suzie (Ann-Margaret), Helm infiltrates Wall's remote hideaway to free the doctor and stop Wall. In The Ambushers, yet another criminal mastermind is on hand to steal America's newest superweapon, which just happens to be a flying saucer. Along with sexy fellow agent Sheila Sommers (Janice Rule), Helm fights to retrieve the saucer from evil overlord Leopold Caselius (Albert Salmi) and femme-fatale Francesca Madeiros (Senta Berger), who comes equipped with drugged lipstick. The last film in the series, The Wrecking Crew, features Nigel Green as Count Massimo Contini, another criminal mastermind who has successfully stolen a trainload of gold bullion, leaving the U.S. and England on the brink of economic collapse. Along with gorgeous but accident prone agent Freya Carlson (Sharon Tate), Helm is dispatched to attempt to retrieve the gold,. Fully aware of Helm's proclivities, Contini sends out two beautiful accomplices, Linka Karensky (Elke Sommer) and Wen Yu-Rang (Nancy Kwan), to get rid of him. The Matt Helm series is a bewildering quartet of films for the time in which they were made: with the British invasion already having transformed the music industry virtually overnight, and the country rocked by social upheaval as American youth rebelled against the social order, Martin and his Rat Pack cronies were becoming increasingly anachronistic. While buddy Frank Sinatra was attempting to turn back the clock with his "Tony Rome" films (Tony Rome, Lady in Cement), which at least had the courage of their convictions, the Matt Helm films try to meld the Pack's cool, gin-soaked personae with the youth-oriented "mod" world. The result is something like putting Olivia Newton John and Gene Kelly together in Xanadu. The only possible appeal was to the quickly dwindling backyard luau crowd, who had long since worn out their copies of Arthur Lyman's Taboo. Martin, who was capable of some fine acting, tried here to bring the same lackadaisical, laid-back charm to the big screen that audiences were enjoying on his popular weekly television variety show, produced at the same time as these films: but what worked so well on the small screen is disastrous on the big screen, particularly in a genre that requires a more high-wattage performance to make it funny. Martin sleep-walks through the films as if he were laying back on his television couch and crooning a chorus of "Welcome to My World." And the passage of time has been even less kind to the series: at a distance of forty years what little charm the films had to 60s audiences has long since been forgotten. The best of the lot is The Silencers, mainly due to Stella Stevens' hilarious performance as the goofy Hendrix. Janice Rule nearly steals The Ambushers from Martin, if for no other reason than that she appears to have been awake during the filming; and the underrated Elke Sommer seems to be the only one of the bunch with a full grasp of what kind of film she's in. In the end, the best that can be said about the Mat Helm series is that they are marginally better than the Salt & Pepper films. For more information about Matt Helm Lounge, visit Sony Pictures. To order Matt Helm Lounge, go to TCM Shopping. by Fred Hunter

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Location scenes filmed on the French Riviera and the Isle of Wight.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1966

Re-released in United States on Video April 16, 1996

Sequel to "The Silencers" (1966) directed by Phil Karlson.

Released in United States 1966

Re-released in United States on Video April 16, 1996