The Man Who Loved Redheads


1h 29m 1954
The Man Who Loved Redheads

Brief Synopsis

The honourable Mark St. Neots is playing with some 'chums' when he meets and is bowled over by Sylvia. As he grows older he retains his image of this beautiful young girl with the red hair. Through a chance meeting, he can pursue his career in the diplomatic corps as well as the young ladies he meets. A charming comedy with a sting in the tail.

Film Details

Also Known As
Man Who Loved Redheads
Release Date
1954
Distribution Company
United Artists Films; United Artists Films

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 29m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Eastmancolor)

Synopsis

The honourable Mark St. Neots is playing with some 'chums' when he meets and is bowled over by Sylvia. As he grows older he retains his image of this beautiful young girl with the red hair. Through a chance meeting, he can pursue his career in the diplomatic corps as well as the young ladies he meets. A charming comedy with a sting in the tail.

Film Details

Also Known As
Man Who Loved Redheads
Release Date
1954
Distribution Company
United Artists Films; United Artists Films

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 29m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Eastmancolor)

Articles

Moira Shearer (1926-2006)


Her contributions to film may have been brief, but for at least one film, Michael Powell's dance opus The Red Shoes (1948), this elegant, gorgeous redhead became a film icon for her balletic performance. Sadly, that actress, Moira Shearer, died on January 31 in Oxford, England of natural causes. She was 80.

Born Moira Shearer King on January 17, 1926 in Dunfermline, Scotland. Her father, an engineer, moved the family to Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia), where she was pushed into dance lessons by her mother. After the family returned to Scotland, she received lessons from the legendary Russian dance teacher Nikolai Legat. When she was just 16 she joined the Sadler's Wells Ballet and made her big national debut at 20 as Sleeping Beauty at the Royal Opera House in London.

In 1948, Powell and co-director Emeric Pressburger cast Shearer in the title role of Victoria Page, the young ballerina who sacrifices all for her career. The plot might have been a touch old fashioned, but the glorious technicolor and Robert Helpmann's florid, dazzling choreography, made this film as exciting on both sides of the Atlantic; and Shearer, complete with lucid beauty and captivating movements, a star.

After the film, Shearer returned to ballet, and following a brief U.S. tour in 1950, she made her second film, again for Powell in The Tales of Hoffmann (1951). A few more movies followed, The Story of Three Loves (1953), The Man Who Loved Redheads (1955), and a third film for Powell, the notorious Peeping Tom (1960), where she meets a grisly death at the hands of a psychotic photographer (Karl Boehm). Shearer concentrated on stage work afterwards before retiring to raise a family. She is survived by her husband of 56 years, Ludovic Kennedy; a son, Alastair; and daughters, Ailsa, Rachel, and Fiona.

by Michael T. Toole
Moira Shearer (1926-2006)

Moira Shearer (1926-2006)

Her contributions to film may have been brief, but for at least one film, Michael Powell's dance opus The Red Shoes (1948), this elegant, gorgeous redhead became a film icon for her balletic performance. Sadly, that actress, Moira Shearer, died on January 31 in Oxford, England of natural causes. She was 80. Born Moira Shearer King on January 17, 1926 in Dunfermline, Scotland. Her father, an engineer, moved the family to Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia), where she was pushed into dance lessons by her mother. After the family returned to Scotland, she received lessons from the legendary Russian dance teacher Nikolai Legat. When she was just 16 she joined the Sadler's Wells Ballet and made her big national debut at 20 as Sleeping Beauty at the Royal Opera House in London. In 1948, Powell and co-director Emeric Pressburger cast Shearer in the title role of Victoria Page, the young ballerina who sacrifices all for her career. The plot might have been a touch old fashioned, but the glorious technicolor and Robert Helpmann's florid, dazzling choreography, made this film as exciting on both sides of the Atlantic; and Shearer, complete with lucid beauty and captivating movements, a star. After the film, Shearer returned to ballet, and following a brief U.S. tour in 1950, she made her second film, again for Powell in The Tales of Hoffmann (1951). A few more movies followed, The Story of Three Loves (1953), The Man Who Loved Redheads (1955), and a third film for Powell, the notorious Peeping Tom (1960), where she meets a grisly death at the hands of a psychotic photographer (Karl Boehm). Shearer concentrated on stage work afterwards before retiring to raise a family. She is survived by her husband of 56 years, Ludovic Kennedy; a son, Alastair; and daughters, Ailsa, Rachel, and Fiona. by Michael T. Toole

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