Loulou


1h 50m 1980

Film Details

Also Known As
Lou Lou
Release Date
1980
Production Company
Gaumont
Distribution Company
Curzon Artificial Eye; Gaumont International Productions; New Yorker Films; New Yorker Films

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 50m

Synopsis

Crew

Alain Alitbol

Art Direction

R Anthony

Song

R Anthony

Song Performer ("La Nouvelle Vague")

Georges Bacri

Song ("Like A Bird On The Wing")

Max Berto

Art Direction

Dominique Bonnaud

Assistant Director

D Chase

Song ("Hate You Baby")

Cyril Collard

Assistant Director

Sophie Coussein

Editor

Jean-paul Rosa Dacosta

Camera Operator

Dominique Dalmasso

Sound Recording Mixer

Yann Dedet

Editor

Yves Gasser

Producer

Henri Gilles

Production Coordinator

Pierre-william Glenn

Cinematographer

Jean-francois Gondre

Camera Operator

Patrick Grandperret

Assistant Director

Klaus Hellwig

Producer

Dominique Hennequin

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Pierre Heros

Production Supervisor

Arlette Langman

Adaptation

Arlette Langman

Dialogue

Arlette Langman

Screenwriter

Beatrice Launay

Production Assistant

Jean-pierre Lelong

Sound Effects

Jacques Loiseleux

Cinematographer

D Martial

Song Performer ("Celimene")

D Martial

Song

Jacques Maumont

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Daniel Messere

Associate Producer

Dorothee Nonn

Costumes

Hugues Nonn

Production Manager

Maggie Perlado

Camera Operator

Yves Peyrot

Executive Producer

Maurice Pialat

Dialogue

Maurice Pialat

Screenplay

Maurice Pialat

Adaptation

J Roux

Song ("Love Is Gone With The Wind")

Jean-pierre Sabar

Song ("Hate You Baby")

Philippe Sarde

Song Performer ("Like A Bird On The Wing")

Philippe Sarde

Music Adaptation

Philippe Sarde

Song

Jean-pierre Sarrazin

Art Direction

G Sommaire

Song ("Celimene")

N Sonn

Song ("Love Is Gone With The Wind")

Jean-claude Vicquery

Camera Operator

Pierre Wallon

Assistant Director

Film Details

Also Known As
Lou Lou
Release Date
1980
Production Company
Gaumont
Distribution Company
Curzon Artificial Eye; Gaumont International Productions; New Yorker Films; New Yorker Films

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 50m

Articles

Maurice Pialat (1926-2003)


Maurice Pialat, the highly influential, award winning French film director, who focused unflinchingly on brutal, realistic portrayals of marital problems, adolescence, and family life, died December 11 at his Paris home of kidney failure. He was 77.

Born in the mountain village of Cunhat, Puy de Dome, France on August 31, 1925, Pialat grew up in Paris from age three and studied art at its Ecole des Arts Decoratifs and Ecole des Beaux Arts. After World War II, he painted and had several exhibitions of his work. By the late '50s, Pialat became fascinated with cinema, and he got his start making short films, notably L'Amour Existe/Love Exists (1960), which won a prize at the Venice Festival. Pialat spent the next decade directing for French television and making documentaries in Turkey and Saudi Arabia before embarking on his feature film career in Enfance nue, L' aka Naked Childhood (1969). This bleak, semi-autobiographical drama about a troubled childhood immediately set the tone for Pialat's cinema verite style: tough realism, the use of non-professional actors (with some exceptions), long takes and moments of punctuating improvisation. Pialat continued to incorporate personal issues in his next two films: Nous ne vieillrons pas ensemble/We Will Not Grow Old Together (1972), about his agonizing marital breakdown; and Gueule ouverte, La aka The Mouth Agape (1974), about the impact of his elderly mother's death from cancer.

International fame arrived with his first film featuring the celebrated French star Gerard Depardieu, Loulou (1980). This trenchant study of middle-class boredom and the cathartic benefits of hedonism and thuggery drew praise from all quarters and proved Pialat to be one of the toughest critics on modern French society. His next film A nos amours aka To Our Loves (1983), focused on the emotionally unstable life of a promiscuous teenager (Sandrine Bonnaire) with Pialat acting impressively as her perplexed father; and Police (1985), was his first venture into the crime genre that reunited him with Depardieu.

He won the Cannes Film Festival's coveted Palme d'Or/Golden Palm for Sous le soleil de Satan aka Under Satan's Sun (1987) a harsh, provocative tale about a clergyman's (Gerard Depardieu) disturbing relationship with a young woman (Sandrine Bonnaire) and his encounter with satanic elements. Pialat's last two films were met with lukewarm reception: Van Gogh (1991), was his overlong look at the last year of the painter's life; and his final film, Le Garcu (1995) was a refreshingly simple story about a young boy (Pialat's son Antoine) and his aimless, womanizing father (Depardieu).

Although he only made ten feature length films in his career, Pialat made his mark in French cinema with his tough cinematic techniques and probing subject matters. He is survived by his only son, Antoine.

by Michael T. Toole
Maurice Pialat (1926-2003)

Maurice Pialat (1926-2003)

Maurice Pialat, the highly influential, award winning French film director, who focused unflinchingly on brutal, realistic portrayals of marital problems, adolescence, and family life, died December 11 at his Paris home of kidney failure. He was 77. Born in the mountain village of Cunhat, Puy de Dome, France on August 31, 1925, Pialat grew up in Paris from age three and studied art at its Ecole des Arts Decoratifs and Ecole des Beaux Arts. After World War II, he painted and had several exhibitions of his work. By the late '50s, Pialat became fascinated with cinema, and he got his start making short films, notably L'Amour Existe/Love Exists (1960), which won a prize at the Venice Festival. Pialat spent the next decade directing for French television and making documentaries in Turkey and Saudi Arabia before embarking on his feature film career in Enfance nue, L' aka Naked Childhood (1969). This bleak, semi-autobiographical drama about a troubled childhood immediately set the tone for Pialat's cinema verite style: tough realism, the use of non-professional actors (with some exceptions), long takes and moments of punctuating improvisation. Pialat continued to incorporate personal issues in his next two films: Nous ne vieillrons pas ensemble/We Will Not Grow Old Together (1972), about his agonizing marital breakdown; and Gueule ouverte, La aka The Mouth Agape (1974), about the impact of his elderly mother's death from cancer. International fame arrived with his first film featuring the celebrated French star Gerard Depardieu, Loulou (1980). This trenchant study of middle-class boredom and the cathartic benefits of hedonism and thuggery drew praise from all quarters and proved Pialat to be one of the toughest critics on modern French society. His next film A nos amours aka To Our Loves (1983), focused on the emotionally unstable life of a promiscuous teenager (Sandrine Bonnaire) with Pialat acting impressively as her perplexed father; and Police (1985), was his first venture into the crime genre that reunited him with Depardieu. He won the Cannes Film Festival's coveted Palme d'Or/Golden Palm for Sous le soleil de Satan aka Under Satan's Sun (1987) a harsh, provocative tale about a clergyman's (Gerard Depardieu) disturbing relationship with a young woman (Sandrine Bonnaire) and his encounter with satanic elements. Pialat's last two films were met with lukewarm reception: Van Gogh (1991), was his overlong look at the last year of the painter's life; and his final film, Le Garcu (1995) was a refreshingly simple story about a young boy (Pialat's son Antoine) and his aimless, womanizing father (Depardieu). Although he only made ten feature length films in his career, Pialat made his mark in French cinema with his tough cinematic techniques and probing subject matters. He is survived by his only son, Antoine. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter January 1, 1980

Released in United States 1980

Shown at New York Film Festival September-October 1980.

Released in USA on video.

Released in United States Winter January 1, 1980

Released in United States 1980 (Shown at New York Film Festival September-October 1980.)