Ladies And Gentlemen, The Fabulous Stains


1h 27m 1982

Brief Synopsis

An obsessed young woman launches an all-girl rock band.

Film Details

Also Known As
Ladies & Gentlemen, the Fabulous Stains, Ladies & Gentlemen... The Fabulous Stains, Ladies and Gentlemen, Ladies and Gentlemen: The Fabulous Stains
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Music
Release Date
1982
Production Company
Paramount Pictures
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 27m

Synopsis

Two orphaned girls and their cousin vent their frustrations through performing as the punk band, The Stains. Before long, the media discovers them, and the girls go on tour with The Looters, idealistic punks from London. The head of The Looters befriends the leader of The Stains, but is soon disillusioned by what he sees as the American media and public favoring popularity over talent.

Videos

Movie Clip

Ladies and Gentlemen, The Fabulous Stains - You're Nobody John "Fee" Waybill of The Tubes (as "Lou Corpse") taunts rival English punk rocker Billy (Ray Winstone) on the tour bus in Ladies and Gentlemen, The Fabulous Stains, 1982.
Ladies and Gentlemen, The Fabulous Stains - We Don't Put Out "The Stains" (Diane Lane, Laura Dern, Marin Kantor) discover their cult following, "The Looters" (Ray Winstone, Paul Simonon, Steve Jones, Paul Cook) argue and Lawnboy (Barry Ford) goes rasta in Ladies and Gentlemen, The Fabulous Stains, 1982.
Ladies and Gentlemen, The Fabulous Stains - Waste of Time The first performance by Corrine (Diane Lane) and her group bombs until she throws a fashion tantrum, to the horror of bandmates (Laura Dern and Marin Kanter) in Ladies and Gentlemen, The Fabulous Stains, 1982.
Ladies and Gentlemen, The Fabulous Stains - The Looters Ray Winstone (as Billy) fronts "The Looters," featuring Sex Pistols Steve Jones (Guitar) and Paul Cook (Drums), Paul Simonon (of The Clash, Bass) and fan Diane Lane (as Corinne) in Ladies and Gentlemen, The Fabulous Stains, 1982.
Ladies and Gentlemen, The Fabulous Stains - Open: Interview Opening sequence from Ladies and Gentlemen, The Fabulous Stains, 1982, introduces TV anchor Harley Dennis (Peter Donat), Corrine "3rd Degree" Burns (Diane Lane) and sidekick "Dizzy" (Laura Dern).
Ladies and Gentlemen, The Fabulous Stains - I'm Shocked! John "Fee" Waybill of The Tubes (as "Lou Corpse") finds a dead bandmate, as Ray Winstone (as "Billy") and "The Stains" (Diane Lane, Marin Kanter and Laura Dern) act sullen in Ladies and Gentlemen, The Fabulous Stains, 1982.
Ladies and Gentlemen, The Fabulous Stains - Aunt Linda Corinne (Diane Lane) wants to make a phone call and Jessica (Laura Dern) wants to change her name, to the disgust of Linda (Christine Lahti) and Brenda (Janet Wright) in Ladies and Gentlemen, The Fabulous Stains, 1982.

Film Details

Also Known As
Ladies & Gentlemen, the Fabulous Stains, Ladies & Gentlemen... The Fabulous Stains, Ladies and Gentlemen, Ladies and Gentlemen: The Fabulous Stains
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Music
Release Date
1982
Production Company
Paramount Pictures
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 27m

Articles

The Gist (Ladies and Gentlemen: The Fabulous Stains) - THE GIST


If you were lucky enough to have cable television in the 80's and happened to be staying up late on a Friday or Saturday night, you might have been able to catch the film Ladies and Gentlemen, the Fabulous Stains (1982) on Showtime or maybe the late night television program, "Night Flight". The classic tale of an all-girl punk band trying to make it into the big time was never officially released on home video and save for a few art house theater screenings and the occasional bootleg that would pop up, the film has been virtually unattainable.

The story behind Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains is a messy and complicated one. It was riddled with production problems, an editing process that took over a year to complete, and after all was said and done, Paramount Studios decided to shelve the film for over 20 years. Director Lou Adler, who was best known for his work in the music industry (he was the manager of many classic acts, including The Mamas & The Papas and Carole King), had directed one other film before The Fabulous Stains: the Cheech & Chong classic Up in Smoke (1978). Adler at least had a wealth of talent involved, including Academy Award Winner screenwriter Nancy Dowd, 15 year old actor Diane Lane as the lead (coming off her very first movie, A Little Romance [1979]), and real-life punk rock musicians from current acts such as The Sex Pistols , The Tubes, and The Clash. Dowd, who had previously won an Academy Award for penning the Hal Ashby-directed Vietnam veteran saga Coming Home (1978), had been inspired by punk rock band The Ramones to write ...The Fabulous Stains. She hired punk rock columnist Caroline Coon, who had done much of the initial writing about the UK punk scene years in previous years, to lend her expertise to the costumes and make up on the film.

When it seemed like everything was in place, shooting began and things started coming apart at the seams. Dowd and Adler reportedly did not see eye to eye, with Dowd claiming she felt pushed out of the production by virtually everyone. She even claimed that she was groped by one of the cameramen. Dowd eventually took her name off the film completely and used a pseudonym instead. Adler also took over a year to edit the film after shooting wrapped up, allegedly changing the ending several times. Once Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains was completed, it was previewed at a few test screenings and the response was so poor that Paramount decided not to release it at all. Many of the cast and crew hadn't even seen the film in its entirety after it was completed.

Perhaps it was the serious unavailability of Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains over the years that created its rabid cult following, but the film itself is unique in that it captures a genuine place and time in the music culture, yet has a message that seems relevant. Diane Lane first appears in the movie on a 60 Minutes-type news show as Corrine Burns, a young gal being interviewed about being recently orphaned and fired from her last job. She's smoking and unaffected, applying heavy makeup and giving sarcastic answers to every question she's asked, talking about a band she's in with her sister (Marin Kanter) and her cousin (Laura Dern) called The Stains. Corrine eventually gets backstage at a local punk rock concert featuring The Looters (featuring real-life Sex Pistols' musician Paul Cook plus Steve Jones and Paul Simonon from The Clash, and actor Ray Winstone on lead vocals) playing opener to an aging 70's hard rock band called The Metal Corpses (starring Tubes singer Fee Waybill as lead singer "Lou Corpse"). When Lou asks his tour manager Lawnboy (Barry Ford) to find a new opening act, he hires The Stains for their very first gig. Needless to say, The Stains barely know how to play their instruments. After a few painful notes which leave the audience disinterested and running towards the doors, Corrine finally rips off her trench coat and hat to reveal little more than a see through blouse and underwear, a crazy two-tone skunk striped hairdo, and outrageous red makeup. Corrine begins to taunt the audience and goes into a tirade about "not putting out" before leaving the stage.

Corrine's antics eventually capture the attention of a local news anchor who waxes philosophical over the band's provocative look while promoting their next shows on air. Suddenly the word spreads and the Stains gain a following. Young girls from all over begin dressing like Corrine and attending the shows in hoards, claiming Corrine as a quasi feminist icon. The Stains start playing better (their sound is very reminiscent of underground girl group The Shaggs and many of the riot grrrl bands to come) and are getting bigger and better gigs thanks to their newfound fame. Looters lead singer Billy (Winstone) tries to school Corrine on the nature of the business while trying to give her some emotional support but she hardly pays attention; The Stains were now an overnight sensation and Corrine was now calling for The Looters to be THEIR opening act! The Stains seemed to have finally made it...but will their fame last?

Despite the unevenness of the pacing at times and the occasional gaps in plot (perhaps due to the lengthy editing process), Ladies and Gentlemen, the Fabulous Stains still manages to be very entertaining. The topics of media-created fame, gimmick over true talent, and the sexualization of young female musicians are all touched on in the film and the movie is also a great glimpse into the early 80's punk scene. It's amazing that Adler managed to score members of The Clash and The Sex Pistols while they were still in their heyday. Fee Waybill gives a memorable performance as the washed up Lou Corpse; it's a shame he wasn't able to make more films. The real treat however is 15-year old Diane Lane as the tough acting, rebellious Corrine "Third Degree" Burns. Fans of Lane will definitely be able to see her emerging talent as an actress of great promise in this film.

Despite all the problems Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains has suffered along the way, there is a happy ending to the story; fans that have been waiting to see the film finally got their wish in September of 2008 when Rhino Records released the movie on DVD, including commentary tracks with Lou Adler and a very entertaining joint commentary track with Laura Dern and Diane Lane.

Producer: Joe Roth
Director: Lou Adler
Screenplay: Rob Morton
Cinematography: Bruce Surtees
Film Editing: Tom Benko
Cast: Diane Lane (Corinne Burns), Ray Winstone (Billy - Vocals for The Looters), Peter Donat (Harley Dennis), David Clennon (Dave Robell - The Agent), John Lehne (Stu McGrath), Cynthia Sikes (Alicia Meeker), Janet Wright (Aunt Linda's Friend Brenda), Mia Bendixsen (pregnant girl in ladies' room), Laura Dern (Jessica McNeil), Stuart Ferguson (Gold Key D.J.), Marin Kanter (Tracy Burns).
C-87m.

by Millie De Chirico
The Gist (Ladies And Gentlemen: The Fabulous Stains) - The Gist

The Gist (Ladies and Gentlemen: The Fabulous Stains) - THE GIST

If you were lucky enough to have cable television in the 80's and happened to be staying up late on a Friday or Saturday night, you might have been able to catch the film Ladies and Gentlemen, the Fabulous Stains (1982) on Showtime or maybe the late night television program, "Night Flight". The classic tale of an all-girl punk band trying to make it into the big time was never officially released on home video and save for a few art house theater screenings and the occasional bootleg that would pop up, the film has been virtually unattainable. The story behind Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains is a messy and complicated one. It was riddled with production problems, an editing process that took over a year to complete, and after all was said and done, Paramount Studios decided to shelve the film for over 20 years. Director Lou Adler, who was best known for his work in the music industry (he was the manager of many classic acts, including The Mamas & The Papas and Carole King), had directed one other film before The Fabulous Stains: the Cheech & Chong classic Up in Smoke (1978). Adler at least had a wealth of talent involved, including Academy Award Winner screenwriter Nancy Dowd, 15 year old actor Diane Lane as the lead (coming off her very first movie, A Little Romance [1979]), and real-life punk rock musicians from current acts such as The Sex Pistols , The Tubes, and The Clash. Dowd, who had previously won an Academy Award for penning the Hal Ashby-directed Vietnam veteran saga Coming Home (1978), had been inspired by punk rock band The Ramones to write ...The Fabulous Stains. She hired punk rock columnist Caroline Coon, who had done much of the initial writing about the UK punk scene years in previous years, to lend her expertise to the costumes and make up on the film. When it seemed like everything was in place, shooting began and things started coming apart at the seams. Dowd and Adler reportedly did not see eye to eye, with Dowd claiming she felt pushed out of the production by virtually everyone. She even claimed that she was groped by one of the cameramen. Dowd eventually took her name off the film completely and used a pseudonym instead. Adler also took over a year to edit the film after shooting wrapped up, allegedly changing the ending several times. Once Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains was completed, it was previewed at a few test screenings and the response was so poor that Paramount decided not to release it at all. Many of the cast and crew hadn't even seen the film in its entirety after it was completed. Perhaps it was the serious unavailability of Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains over the years that created its rabid cult following, but the film itself is unique in that it captures a genuine place and time in the music culture, yet has a message that seems relevant. Diane Lane first appears in the movie on a 60 Minutes-type news show as Corrine Burns, a young gal being interviewed about being recently orphaned and fired from her last job. She's smoking and unaffected, applying heavy makeup and giving sarcastic answers to every question she's asked, talking about a band she's in with her sister (Marin Kanter) and her cousin (Laura Dern) called The Stains. Corrine eventually gets backstage at a local punk rock concert featuring The Looters (featuring real-life Sex Pistols' musician Paul Cook plus Steve Jones and Paul Simonon from The Clash, and actor Ray Winstone on lead vocals) playing opener to an aging 70's hard rock band called The Metal Corpses (starring Tubes singer Fee Waybill as lead singer "Lou Corpse"). When Lou asks his tour manager Lawnboy (Barry Ford) to find a new opening act, he hires The Stains for their very first gig. Needless to say, The Stains barely know how to play their instruments. After a few painful notes which leave the audience disinterested and running towards the doors, Corrine finally rips off her trench coat and hat to reveal little more than a see through blouse and underwear, a crazy two-tone skunk striped hairdo, and outrageous red makeup. Corrine begins to taunt the audience and goes into a tirade about "not putting out" before leaving the stage. Corrine's antics eventually capture the attention of a local news anchor who waxes philosophical over the band's provocative look while promoting their next shows on air. Suddenly the word spreads and the Stains gain a following. Young girls from all over begin dressing like Corrine and attending the shows in hoards, claiming Corrine as a quasi feminist icon. The Stains start playing better (their sound is very reminiscent of underground girl group The Shaggs and many of the riot grrrl bands to come) and are getting bigger and better gigs thanks to their newfound fame. Looters lead singer Billy (Winstone) tries to school Corrine on the nature of the business while trying to give her some emotional support but she hardly pays attention; The Stains were now an overnight sensation and Corrine was now calling for The Looters to be THEIR opening act! The Stains seemed to have finally made it...but will their fame last? Despite the unevenness of the pacing at times and the occasional gaps in plot (perhaps due to the lengthy editing process), Ladies and Gentlemen, the Fabulous Stains still manages to be very entertaining. The topics of media-created fame, gimmick over true talent, and the sexualization of young female musicians are all touched on in the film and the movie is also a great glimpse into the early 80's punk scene. It's amazing that Adler managed to score members of The Clash and The Sex Pistols while they were still in their heyday. Fee Waybill gives a memorable performance as the washed up Lou Corpse; it's a shame he wasn't able to make more films. The real treat however is 15-year old Diane Lane as the tough acting, rebellious Corrine "Third Degree" Burns. Fans of Lane will definitely be able to see her emerging talent as an actress of great promise in this film. Despite all the problems Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains has suffered along the way, there is a happy ending to the story; fans that have been waiting to see the film finally got their wish in September of 2008 when Rhino Records released the movie on DVD, including commentary tracks with Lou Adler and a very entertaining joint commentary track with Laura Dern and Diane Lane. Producer: Joe Roth Director: Lou Adler Screenplay: Rob Morton Cinematography: Bruce Surtees Film Editing: Tom Benko Cast: Diane Lane (Corinne Burns), Ray Winstone (Billy - Vocals for The Looters), Peter Donat (Harley Dennis), David Clennon (Dave Robell - The Agent), John Lehne (Stu McGrath), Cynthia Sikes (Alicia Meeker), Janet Wright (Aunt Linda's Friend Brenda), Mia Bendixsen (pregnant girl in ladies' room), Laura Dern (Jessica McNeil), Stuart Ferguson (Gold Key D.J.), Marin Kanter (Tracy Burns). C-87m. by Millie De Chirico

Insider Info (Ladies and Gentlemen: The Fabulous Stains) - BEHND THE SCENES


Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains takes place in an economically depressed section of Pennsylvania but was actually shot in Vancouver because it was cheaper to shoot there.

Diane Lane refused to dye her hair for the several changes of hair color throughout the movie. Instead, the make-up department used different wigs with different lengths to simulate hair growth/roots instead.

The final sequence of Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains was shot and added on after initial reaction to the film was unsatisfactory. Laura Dern is noticeably taller in these shots.

Laura Dern's mother, Diane Ladd, refused to give her permission to travel to shoot on location, as she felt Dern was too young. Dern sued for legal emancipation, won it, and did the movie anyway.

Pat Smear of The Germs/Nirvana wanted to re-record the soundtrack to Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains a few years ago.

Adler said in an interview that the ending was "sort of tailored after The Go-Go's."

Steve Jones (who plays Steve from The Looters) was allegedly going through drug withdrawal while filming.

Fee Waybill (Lou Corpse) in an interview remembers smoking pot in between takes with the other real-life musicians during shooting.

Lots of rumors were circulated about why Paramount shelved Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains for so long. Reportedly, Paramount did a test screening of the film in Denver shortly after its release and it completely flopped.

Independent filmmaker Sarah Jacobson collaborated with filmmaker Sam Green on a short documentary about the film for the IFC television channel's show Split Screen called The Making of Ladies and Gentlemen, The Fabulous Stains.

Fans of the film include musician Courtney Love, writer/comedian Jake Fogelnest, and musician Jon Bon Jovi (who dated Diane Lane in the 1980's).

Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains also reportedly inspired Toby Vail of the riot grrrl band Bikini Kill, as well as a host of other riot grrrl bands of the 1990's, such as L7.

Lou Adler claims he sent a copy of the DVD to Steve Jones and wrote a note that simply said, "Finally.

by Millie De Chirico

SOURCES:
All Movie Guide - www.allmovie.com
Blog Critics Magazine – www.blogcritics.org
Bright Lights Film Journal – www.brightlightsfilm.com
Film Threat - www.filmthreat.com
IFC Film News - www.IFC.com
IMDB – www.imdb.com
LAist – www.laist.com
The New York Times - www.nytimes.com
The Onion's AV Club - www.avclub.com
Pop Matters - www.popmatters.com
Spin Magazine – www.spin.com
Wikipedia – www.wikipedia.com
The Making of Ladies and Gentlemen, The Fabulous Stains by Sarah Jacobson, 2004 (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0406051)

Insider Info (Ladies and Gentlemen: The Fabulous Stains) - BEHND THE SCENES

Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains takes place in an economically depressed section of Pennsylvania but was actually shot in Vancouver because it was cheaper to shoot there. Diane Lane refused to dye her hair for the several changes of hair color throughout the movie. Instead, the make-up department used different wigs with different lengths to simulate hair growth/roots instead. The final sequence of Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains was shot and added on after initial reaction to the film was unsatisfactory. Laura Dern is noticeably taller in these shots. Laura Dern's mother, Diane Ladd, refused to give her permission to travel to shoot on location, as she felt Dern was too young. Dern sued for legal emancipation, won it, and did the movie anyway. Pat Smear of The Germs/Nirvana wanted to re-record the soundtrack to Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains a few years ago. Adler said in an interview that the ending was "sort of tailored after The Go-Go's." Steve Jones (who plays Steve from The Looters) was allegedly going through drug withdrawal while filming. Fee Waybill (Lou Corpse) in an interview remembers smoking pot in between takes with the other real-life musicians during shooting. Lots of rumors were circulated about why Paramount shelved Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains for so long. Reportedly, Paramount did a test screening of the film in Denver shortly after its release and it completely flopped. Independent filmmaker Sarah Jacobson collaborated with filmmaker Sam Green on a short documentary about the film for the IFC television channel's show Split Screen called The Making of Ladies and Gentlemen, The Fabulous Stains. Fans of the film include musician Courtney Love, writer/comedian Jake Fogelnest, and musician Jon Bon Jovi (who dated Diane Lane in the 1980's). Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains also reportedly inspired Toby Vail of the riot grrrl band Bikini Kill, as well as a host of other riot grrrl bands of the 1990's, such as L7. Lou Adler claims he sent a copy of the DVD to Steve Jones and wrote a note that simply said, "Finally. by Millie De Chirico SOURCES: All Movie Guide - www.allmovie.com Blog Critics Magazine – www.blogcritics.org Bright Lights Film Journal – www.brightlightsfilm.com Film Threat - www.filmthreat.com IFC Film News - www.IFC.com IMDB – www.imdb.com LAist – www.laist.com The New York Times - www.nytimes.com The Onion's AV Club - www.avclub.com Pop Matters - www.popmatters.com Spin Magazine – www.spin.com Wikipedia – www.wikipedia.com The Making of Ladies and Gentlemen, The Fabulous Stains by Sarah Jacobson, 2004 (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0406051)

In the Know (Ladies and Gentlemen: The Fabulous Stains) - TRIVIA


Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains was also known as All Washed Up (US original script title) and The Professionals (US pre-release title).

In 1974, Adler helped produce the American stage version of The Rocky Horror Show as well as the film version, The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975).

Adler was ready to take on a new project after Up in Smoke (1978) and was presented with two scripts: one for The Fabulous Stains and another for the film Airplane.

After Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains, Adler would never direct again.

Screenwriter Nancy Dowd also penned the screenplay for the hockey classic Slap Shot (1977).

Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains was produced by Joe Roth, who would later go on to become chairman of Walt Disney Studios.

Jodie Foster was initially offered the role of Corinne.

Steve Jones and Paul Cook from the Sex Pistols appear in the movie as members of The Looters, as does Paul Simonon from The Clash.

Fee Waybill from The Tubes plays the Alice Cooper-inspired Lou Corpse. This was his acting debut.

L.A. punk icon Black Randy from Black Randy and the Metrosquad also makes an appearance. Ray Winstone previously appeared in the British mod classic Quadrophenia (1979). There are also brief cameos by Elizabeth Daily (a.k.a. E.G. Daily) and Brent Spiner (Star Trek: The Next Generation).

B-movie queen Debbie Rochon (most famous for her films with Troma) appears as an extra in the film. Rochon was reportedly only 12 years old when she cast in Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains, and was homeless at the time.

Diane Lane had just turned 15 when she made the film. Laura Dern was 13.

Lou Adler liked Lane in her first film, A Little Romance (1979), and found her both "tough and vulnerable" and "what we were looking for [for the part]".

by Millie De Chirico

SOURCES: All Movie Guide - www.allmovie.com
Blog Critics Magazine – www.blogcritics.org
Bright Lights Film Journal – www.brightlightsfilm.com
Film Threat - www.filmthreat.com
IFC Film News - www.IFC.com
IMDB – www.imdb.com
LAist – www.laist.com
The New York Times - www.nytimes.com
The Onion's AV Club - www.avclub.com
Pop Matters - www.popmatters.com
Spin Magazine – www.spin.com
Wikipedia – www.wikipedia.com
The Making of Ladies and Gentlemen, The Fabulous Stains by Sarah Jacobson, 2004 (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0406051)

In the Know (Ladies and Gentlemen: The Fabulous Stains) - TRIVIA

Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains was also known as All Washed Up (US original script title) and The Professionals (US pre-release title). In 1974, Adler helped produce the American stage version of The Rocky Horror Show as well as the film version, The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975). Adler was ready to take on a new project after Up in Smoke (1978) and was presented with two scripts: one for The Fabulous Stains and another for the film Airplane. After Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains, Adler would never direct again. Screenwriter Nancy Dowd also penned the screenplay for the hockey classic Slap Shot (1977). Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains was produced by Joe Roth, who would later go on to become chairman of Walt Disney Studios. Jodie Foster was initially offered the role of Corinne. Steve Jones and Paul Cook from the Sex Pistols appear in the movie as members of The Looters, as does Paul Simonon from The Clash. Fee Waybill from The Tubes plays the Alice Cooper-inspired Lou Corpse. This was his acting debut. L.A. punk icon Black Randy from Black Randy and the Metrosquad also makes an appearance. Ray Winstone previously appeared in the British mod classic Quadrophenia (1979). There are also brief cameos by Elizabeth Daily (a.k.a. E.G. Daily) and Brent Spiner (Star Trek: The Next Generation). B-movie queen Debbie Rochon (most famous for her films with Troma) appears as an extra in the film. Rochon was reportedly only 12 years old when she cast in Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains, and was homeless at the time. Diane Lane had just turned 15 when she made the film. Laura Dern was 13. Lou Adler liked Lane in her first film, A Little Romance (1979), and found her both "tough and vulnerable" and "what we were looking for [for the part]". by Millie De Chirico SOURCES: All Movie Guide - www.allmovie.com Blog Critics Magazine – www.blogcritics.org Bright Lights Film Journal – www.brightlightsfilm.com Film Threat - www.filmthreat.com IFC Film News - www.IFC.com IMDB – www.imdb.com LAist – www.laist.com The New York Times - www.nytimes.com The Onion's AV Club - www.avclub.com Pop Matters - www.popmatters.com Spin Magazine – www.spin.com Wikipedia – www.wikipedia.com The Making of Ladies and Gentlemen, The Fabulous Stains by Sarah Jacobson, 2004 (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0406051)

Yea or Nay (Ladies and Gentlemen: The Fabulous Stains) - CRITIC REVIEWS OF "THE FABULOUS STAINS"


"Mr. Adler surely knows his way around the music business, but the film reflects none of that expertise."
– Janet Maslin, The New York Times, March 6, 1985

"Adler has tacked on a happy ending, in what seems to have been a desperate attempt to salvage the film's commercial prospects, but he needn't have bothered: this "exposé" is too familiar and too sloppily filmed to shock anyone. Diane Lane stars, and there's something magnetic about her even though what she's doing can't really be described as acting."
- Dave Kehr, The Chicago Reader

"Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains includes some clever satire of TV magazine shows and happytalk news programs, but this rock movie rings hollow and false. Lane's female, Americanized Johnny Rotten character makes surly pronouncements that are cartoonishly simple and arrogant (although maybe that's the point), and a tantrum thrown by the band's mellow, Rastafarian bus driver (Don Letts inspired?) is unintentionally hilarious....Waybill steals the show as the burned-out heavy metal singer..."
- Jay Schwartz, Hollywood Rock

"Unlike most riot girl movies, this was made for a major studio, Paramount, but the execs were so unhinged by the film's strange, bitter tone that they refused to release it...That said, Stains deserves notice first and foremost as a welcome respite from all those mush-brained John Hughes teen epics of the '80s...The tone of the film is sometimes hokey and often sour, with director Adler taking nervous potshots at a number of targets. With the Metal Corpses, led by the Tubes's Fee Waybill, he skewers those wretched old rockers who continue to play long after their spandex has lost its snap. He hits the media in droll scenes of two brainless newscasters arguing the merits of the Stains. Most merciless is the film's take on the music industry. In Adler's view, everyone's a fake, from the self-absorbed rockers to fickle audiences to conniving manager to Corinne herself."
- Gary Morris, Bright Lights Film Journal

"Though slowed by some vapid melodrama, this is tons of silly, proto-feminist fun, as they tour local malls, filled to capacity with legions of lemming-like girls. Happily, the movie also shows how fast fans can turn ugly when they realize they've been ripped off. Musically, the only halfway decent tune, "The Professionals" (by Cook and Jones) is played to death, while nothing from The Stains is remotely listenable outside of the context of this movie. This pic has authenticity to spare, especially when it comes to the sh*tty little towns bands are forced to play. I only wish Lane was a better actress, because although her shower scene with Winstone accomplishes its desired goal, her anti-social speeches are limp. Slick but surprisingly savvy, it knows the territory, pisses on it with a sharp sense of humor, and captures the period better than most studio pics of that era."
- Steven Puchalski, Shock Cinema

"...strident and unappealing despite good cast. Lahti shines in her two scenes."
- Leonard Maltin's Movie Guide

"While Ladies and Gentlemen, the Fabulous Stains falls short of being the word on the movement, it is a fascinating, entertaining and authentically grimy trawl through the seamy side of the music-biz."
- Channel 4 Film

Yea or Nay (Ladies and Gentlemen: The Fabulous Stains) - CRITIC REVIEWS OF "THE FABULOUS STAINS"

"Mr. Adler surely knows his way around the music business, but the film reflects none of that expertise." – Janet Maslin, The New York Times, March 6, 1985 "Adler has tacked on a happy ending, in what seems to have been a desperate attempt to salvage the film's commercial prospects, but he needn't have bothered: this "exposé" is too familiar and too sloppily filmed to shock anyone. Diane Lane stars, and there's something magnetic about her even though what she's doing can't really be described as acting." - Dave Kehr, The Chicago Reader "Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains includes some clever satire of TV magazine shows and happytalk news programs, but this rock movie rings hollow and false. Lane's female, Americanized Johnny Rotten character makes surly pronouncements that are cartoonishly simple and arrogant (although maybe that's the point), and a tantrum thrown by the band's mellow, Rastafarian bus driver (Don Letts inspired?) is unintentionally hilarious....Waybill steals the show as the burned-out heavy metal singer..." - Jay Schwartz, Hollywood Rock "Unlike most riot girl movies, this was made for a major studio, Paramount, but the execs were so unhinged by the film's strange, bitter tone that they refused to release it...That said, Stains deserves notice first and foremost as a welcome respite from all those mush-brained John Hughes teen epics of the '80s...The tone of the film is sometimes hokey and often sour, with director Adler taking nervous potshots at a number of targets. With the Metal Corpses, led by the Tubes's Fee Waybill, he skewers those wretched old rockers who continue to play long after their spandex has lost its snap. He hits the media in droll scenes of two brainless newscasters arguing the merits of the Stains. Most merciless is the film's take on the music industry. In Adler's view, everyone's a fake, from the self-absorbed rockers to fickle audiences to conniving manager to Corinne herself." - Gary Morris, Bright Lights Film Journal "Though slowed by some vapid melodrama, this is tons of silly, proto-feminist fun, as they tour local malls, filled to capacity with legions of lemming-like girls. Happily, the movie also shows how fast fans can turn ugly when they realize they've been ripped off. Musically, the only halfway decent tune, "The Professionals" (by Cook and Jones) is played to death, while nothing from The Stains is remotely listenable outside of the context of this movie. This pic has authenticity to spare, especially when it comes to the sh*tty little towns bands are forced to play. I only wish Lane was a better actress, because although her shower scene with Winstone accomplishes its desired goal, her anti-social speeches are limp. Slick but surprisingly savvy, it knows the territory, pisses on it with a sharp sense of humor, and captures the period better than most studio pics of that era." - Steven Puchalski, Shock Cinema "...strident and unappealing despite good cast. Lahti shines in her two scenes." - Leonard Maltin's Movie Guide "While Ladies and Gentlemen, the Fabulous Stains falls short of being the word on the movement, it is a fascinating, entertaining and authentically grimy trawl through the seamy side of the music-biz." - Channel 4 Film

Quote It (Ladies and Gentlemen: The Fabulous Stains) - QUOTES FROM "THE FABULOUS STAINS"


Corinne Burns (Diane Lane): "I'm perfect! But nobody in this shithole gets me, because I don't put out!"

Corinne Burns: "Corinne's not my name."
Harley Dennis (Peter Donat): "What is it?"
Corinne Burns: "It's Third Degree Burns."

Dave Robell (David Clennon): "What you were was a concept and you've blown the concept."

Corinne Burns: "Every girl should be given an electric guitar on her 16th birthday."

Corinne Burns: "He was an old man in a young girl's world."

Lawnboy (Barry Ford): "Everybody wanna to go to Heaven, but nobody wanna die..."

Stains Fan, on the topic of Corrine: "She said things I've always wanted to say and I haven't been able to."

Quote It (Ladies and Gentlemen: The Fabulous Stains) - QUOTES FROM "THE FABULOUS STAINS"

Corinne Burns (Diane Lane): "I'm perfect! But nobody in this shithole gets me, because I don't put out!" Corinne Burns: "Corinne's not my name." Harley Dennis (Peter Donat): "What is it?" Corinne Burns: "It's Third Degree Burns." Dave Robell (David Clennon): "What you were was a concept and you've blown the concept." Corinne Burns: "Every girl should be given an electric guitar on her 16th birthday." Corinne Burns: "He was an old man in a young girl's world." Lawnboy (Barry Ford): "Everybody wanna to go to Heaven, but nobody wanna die..." Stains Fan, on the topic of Corrine: "She said things I've always wanted to say and I haven't been able to."

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1982

Released in United States 1982