The Kindred


1h 32m 1987

Film Details

Also Known As
Kindred
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1987
Production Company
Pacific Title & Art Studio; Panavision, Ltd.; Ryder Sound Services Inc; Technicolor
Distribution Company
Entertainment Film Distributors, Ltd.
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Laird International Studios, Culver City, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 32m

Synopsis

Crew

Michael Adams

Stunts

Vera Anderson

Stills

Shelly Angel

Stunts

Bob Bass

Electrician

Tassilo Bauer

Pyrotechnical Effects

Jill Bedford

Set Dresser

Robert Beebe

Property Master

Charles Belardinelli

Pyro Assistant

Sue Benson

Assistant (To Executive Producer)

Becky Block

Art Direction

Nancy Booth

Art Department Staff Member

Findlay Bunting

2nd Assistant Camera

Stephen Carpenter

Screenwriter

Stephen Carpenter

Director Of Photography

Denise Chamian

Casting

Joseph Citarella

Sound Rerecording Mixer

John Clark

On-Set Dresser

John Clark

Set Dresser

Rick Cobian

Set Carpenter

John Cork

Pyro Assistant

Frank Dean

Other

Gary Derouchey

Art Department Staff Member

Dan Driscott

Art Department Staff Member

Paul Duran

Special Effects Associate

Cathy Dwyer

Production Assistant

Lee Elmendorf

Transportation Captain

Chris Emhardt

Mechanical Effects Assistant

Susan Emshwiller

Set Decorator

Dan Feaster

Craft Service

Ed Fink

Production Accountant

Robert D. Fish

Transportation Coordinator

Robert Fitzgerald

Adr Editor

Carrie Frances-king

Production Coordinator

Colette Francis

Special Creatures Assistant

Joel Freeman

Executive Producer

Dan Geller

Other

Earl Ghaffari

Screenwriter

Earl Ghaffari

Editor

Stacey Giachino

Production Manager

Stacey Giachino

Co-Producer

Bess Gilbert

Casting (Extras)

Steven Givens

Electrician

Giuli Grattoni

Hairstyles

Ken Gray

Mechanical Effects Assistant

Tammy Grimaldo

Makeup

Denise Gullixson

Production Accountant

Lisa Harper

Grip

Ralph Hassman

Set Carpenter

Lars Hauglie

Special Effects Coordinator

Lars Hauglie

Special Mechanical Effects

Robert Herron

Stunts

Grover Hesley

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Janet Hirshenson

Casting

Chris Hopkins

Production Designer

David Householter

1st Assistant Camera

Jane Jenkins

Casting

Howard Jensen

Pyrotechnical Effects

Greg Johnson

Effects Assistant

Jeff Kennemore

Special Creatures Assistant

Melinda Kennemore

Effects Wigs

Janell King

Stunts

Jay Koiwai

Other

Reggie Lake

Equipment Consultant

David Lesser

Production Assistant

William Luckey

Construction Coordinator

Denver Mattson

Stunts

Michael Shawn Mccracken

Special Creatures Assistant

Michael Mccracken

Other

Paul Mcilvaine

Grip

Sean Mcmanus

Art Department Staff Member

Brian Mcmillan

Other

James Mcpherson

Special Creatures Assistant

Robert Meckler

Grip

Andy Miller

Special Creatures Assistant

Ralph Milliken

Negative Cutter

Hope Moskowitz

Assistant Editor

Matthew W. Mungle

Special Effects Makeup

John W Murphy

Dolly Grip

John W Murphy

Key Grip

Diane Nabatoff

Associate Producer

David Newman

Music

Lyn Norton-matsuda

Script Supervisor

Adalberto Nunez

Special Creatures Assistant

Jeffrey Obrow

Producer

Jeffrey Obrow

Screenwriter

Pat Paterson

Pyro Assistant

John Penney

Screenwriter

John Penney

Editor

John Penney

Post-Production Supervisor

Ben Perry

Stunt Coordinator

Ben Perry

Stunts

Catherine Perry

Other

Debbie Pinthus

Boom Operator

Jeff Ramsey

Stunts

Jim Ransohoff

Property Master Assistant

Kevin Rockey

Foley Artist

Woodward Romaine Jr.

Other

Glen Rosenthal

Computer Graphics

Thomas C Rude

Set Carpenter

Hari Ryatt

Sound Editor Supervisor

Lanny Savoie

Set Carpenter

Bruce Scivally

Pyro Assistant

Russell Seifert

Makeup Effects Assistant

Lenny Shaw

Production Assistant

Sara Sheranian

Apprentice Editor

Neal Sheridan

Bestboy Grip

Patrick Simmons

Special Creatures Assistant

Antonio Soriano

Gaffer

Joseph Stefano

Screenwriter

Robert Stokemer

Electrician

Mick Strawn

Pyro Assistant

Kelly Sullivan

Assistant Production Coordinator

Peter Summers

Production Manager Assistant

Ramzy Telley

Art Department Staff Member

Nilgun Tolek

Pyro Assistant

Tony Tommasetti

Special Creatures Assistant

Casey Troutman

Foley Artist

Catherine Van Wert

Other

Kristan Wagner

Assistant (To Producers)

Stephan Wassmann

Electrician

Julie Webb

Assistant Editor

Linda Wehde

Apprentice Editor

Leslie Weir

Key Costumer

Ray West

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Everett Wilson

Other

Film Details

Also Known As
Kindred
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1987
Production Company
Pacific Title & Art Studio; Panavision, Ltd.; Ryder Sound Services Inc; Technicolor
Distribution Company
Entertainment Film Distributors, Ltd.
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Laird International Studios, Culver City, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 32m

Articles

TCM Remembers - Kim Hunter


KIM HUNTER, 1922-2002

Kim Hunter, the versatile, distinguished actress who won the Supporting Actress Academy Award for her portrayal as the long-suffering Stella in A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) and appeared as Dr. Zira in three Planet of the Apes movies, died in her Greenwich Village apartment from an apparent heart attack on September 11, 2002. She was 79.

Born Janet Cole in Detroit on November 12, 1922, where her mother was a concert pianist, she made her professional debut at 17 with a small theatre company in Miami. She gained notice immediately with her strong voice and alluring presence, and eventually studied at the Actors' Studio in New York.

She made a striking film debut in an eerie, low-budget RKO horror film, The Seventh Victim (1943), produced by Val Lewton. She played a similar ingenue role in another stylish cult flick, When Strangers Meet (1944) - a film directed by William Castle and notable for featuring Robert Mitchum in one of his first starring roles. Hunter's big break came two years later when Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger cast her in their splendid romantic fantasy, Stairway to Heaven (1946).

Despite her growing popularity as a screen actress, Hunter returned to the stage to make her Broadway debut as Stella in Tennessee Williams'A Streetcar Named Desire (1951). When Elia Kazan adapted the production for the silver screen, she continued her role as Stella opposite Marlon Brando, and won an Oscar as best supporting actress. A few more film roles followed, but sadly her screen career entered a lull in the late 1950s, after Hunter, a liberal Democrat, was listed as a communist sympathizer by Red Channels, a red-hunting booklet that influenced hiring by studios and the Television networks. Kim was blacklisted from both mediums despite never having been labeled a Communist, yet as a strong believer in civil rights she signed a lot of petitions and was a sponsor of a 1949 World Peace Conference in New York. She was widely praised in the industry for her testimony to the New York Supreme Court in 1962 against the publishers of Red Channels, and helped pave the way for clearance of many performers unjustly accused of Communist associations.

Hunter spent the next few years on the stage and didn't make a strong impression again in films until she was cast as Dr. Zira in the Planet of the Apes (1968), as a simian psychiatrist in the classic science fiction film. The success of that film encouraged her to continue playing the same character in two back-to-back sequels - Beneath the Planet of the Apes (1970) and Escape from the Planet of the Apes (1971). Hunter spent the remainder of her career on the stage and television, but she a terrific cameo role in Clint Eastwood's Midnight In The Garden Of Good And Evil (1997), one of her last films. She is survived by her daughter Kathryn, from her first marriage to William Baldwin, and her son Sean, from her marriage to actor and producer Robert Emmett.

By Michael T. Toole

TCM REMEMBERS J. LEE THOMPSON, 1914 - 2002

Oscar-nominated director J. Lee Thompson died August 30th at the age of 88. Though he worked in several genres, Thompson was best-known for his action films. Thompson was born in Bristol England on August 1, 1914. After graduating from college he became a playwright and it was the appearance of one of his plays on London's famous West End that got him noticed by the British film studio, Elstree. His first filmed script was The Pride of Folly in 1937 and others appeared sporadically until his career was side-tracked during the war when Thompson served in the RAF as a B-29 tail gunner. (He also reportedly worked as a dialogue coach on Hitchcock's Jamaica Inn, 1939.) Thompson's directorial debut came in 1950 when he adapted his own play Double Error to the screen as Murder Without Crime. Throughout the decade he directed a variety of dramas and comedies until hitting it big in 1958 with Ice Cold in Alex (released in the US minus 50 minutes under the title Desert Attack). It was nominated for three BAFTAs and was enough of a commercial success that Thompson landed the film that made his career: The Guns of Navarone (1961). This enormous international hit snagged Thompson an Oscar nomination for Best Director. He immediately followed that with the original Cape Fear (1962) and his reputation was set. Though Thompson remained active almost three more decades he didn't reach that level again. He worked on Westerns (Mackenna's Gold, 1969), horror films (Eye of the Devil, 1967), literary adaptations (Huckleberry Finn, 1974) and others. During this time, Thompson directed two Planet of the Apes sequels but was kept most busy working with Charles Bronson, for whom he directed nine films. Thompson's last film was in 1989.

KATRIN CARTLIDGE, 1961 - 2002

The news of actress Katrin Cartlidge's death at the age of 41 has come as a shock. It's not just the age but the thought that even though Cartlidge was already a major actress--despite a slender filmography--she held out the promise of even greater work, a promise that so few artists of any type can make. "Fearless" is perhaps the word most often used to describe Cartlidge but emotions are never enough for an actor; much more is required. Director Mike Leigh said she had "the objective eye of an artist" while remarking on her "her deep-seated suspicion of all forms of woolly thinking and received ideas."

Cartlidge was born in London on May 15, 1961. Her first acting work was on the stage, in tiny independent theatres before she was selected by Peter Gill for the National Theatre. Cartlidge also worked as a dresser at the Royal Court where she later made one of her final stage appearances. She began appearing in the popular British TV series Brookside before making her first film in 1985, Sacred Hearts. A small role in the Robbie Coltrane-Rik Mayall vehicle Eat the Rich (1987) followed before Cartlidge had her first leading role in Mike Leigh's scathing Naked (1993).

Cartlidge never took a safe approach in her films. She told The Guardian that "I try to work with film-makers who I feel will produce something original, revealing and provoking. If something provokes a reaction, it's well worth doing." You can see this in her choice of projects. Before the Rain (1994) dramatized violence in Macedonia in the wake of the Yugoslavian break-up and made Cartlidge something of a star in the area. She appeared in Lars Von Trier's controversial look at redemption, Breaking the Waves (1996), Leigh's sharply detailed story of aging friends Career Girls (1997), as one of Jack the Ripper's victims in From Hell (2001), as a call girl trying to leave the business in Clair Dolan (1998) and in the Oscar-winning film about Bosnia-Herzegovina, No Man's Land (2001). Her last work included a BBC adaptation of Crime and Punishment (2002), playing Salvador Dali's wife Gala in the BBC comedy-drama Surrealissimo (2002) and an appearance in Rosanna Arquette's directorial debut, Searching for Debra Winger (also 2002), a documentary about women in the film industry.

Cartlidge died September 7th from septicaemia brought on by pneumonia.

By Lang Thompson

Tcm Remembers - Kim Hunter

TCM Remembers - Kim Hunter

KIM HUNTER, 1922-2002 Kim Hunter, the versatile, distinguished actress who won the Supporting Actress Academy Award for her portrayal as the long-suffering Stella in A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) and appeared as Dr. Zira in three Planet of the Apes movies, died in her Greenwich Village apartment from an apparent heart attack on September 11, 2002. She was 79. Born Janet Cole in Detroit on November 12, 1922, where her mother was a concert pianist, she made her professional debut at 17 with a small theatre company in Miami. She gained notice immediately with her strong voice and alluring presence, and eventually studied at the Actors' Studio in New York. She made a striking film debut in an eerie, low-budget RKO horror film, The Seventh Victim (1943), produced by Val Lewton. She played a similar ingenue role in another stylish cult flick, When Strangers Meet (1944) - a film directed by William Castle and notable for featuring Robert Mitchum in one of his first starring roles. Hunter's big break came two years later when Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger cast her in their splendid romantic fantasy, Stairway to Heaven (1946). Despite her growing popularity as a screen actress, Hunter returned to the stage to make her Broadway debut as Stella in Tennessee Williams'A Streetcar Named Desire (1951). When Elia Kazan adapted the production for the silver screen, she continued her role as Stella opposite Marlon Brando, and won an Oscar as best supporting actress. A few more film roles followed, but sadly her screen career entered a lull in the late 1950s, after Hunter, a liberal Democrat, was listed as a communist sympathizer by Red Channels, a red-hunting booklet that influenced hiring by studios and the Television networks. Kim was blacklisted from both mediums despite never having been labeled a Communist, yet as a strong believer in civil rights she signed a lot of petitions and was a sponsor of a 1949 World Peace Conference in New York. She was widely praised in the industry for her testimony to the New York Supreme Court in 1962 against the publishers of Red Channels, and helped pave the way for clearance of many performers unjustly accused of Communist associations. Hunter spent the next few years on the stage and didn't make a strong impression again in films until she was cast as Dr. Zira in the Planet of the Apes (1968), as a simian psychiatrist in the classic science fiction film. The success of that film encouraged her to continue playing the same character in two back-to-back sequels - Beneath the Planet of the Apes (1970) and Escape from the Planet of the Apes (1971). Hunter spent the remainder of her career on the stage and television, but she a terrific cameo role in Clint Eastwood's Midnight In The Garden Of Good And Evil (1997), one of her last films. She is survived by her daughter Kathryn, from her first marriage to William Baldwin, and her son Sean, from her marriage to actor and producer Robert Emmett. By Michael T. Toole TCM REMEMBERS J. LEE THOMPSON, 1914 - 2002 Oscar-nominated director J. Lee Thompson died August 30th at the age of 88. Though he worked in several genres, Thompson was best-known for his action films. Thompson was born in Bristol England on August 1, 1914. After graduating from college he became a playwright and it was the appearance of one of his plays on London's famous West End that got him noticed by the British film studio, Elstree. His first filmed script was The Pride of Folly in 1937 and others appeared sporadically until his career was side-tracked during the war when Thompson served in the RAF as a B-29 tail gunner. (He also reportedly worked as a dialogue coach on Hitchcock's Jamaica Inn, 1939.) Thompson's directorial debut came in 1950 when he adapted his own play Double Error to the screen as Murder Without Crime. Throughout the decade he directed a variety of dramas and comedies until hitting it big in 1958 with Ice Cold in Alex (released in the US minus 50 minutes under the title Desert Attack). It was nominated for three BAFTAs and was enough of a commercial success that Thompson landed the film that made his career: The Guns of Navarone (1961). This enormous international hit snagged Thompson an Oscar nomination for Best Director. He immediately followed that with the original Cape Fear (1962) and his reputation was set. Though Thompson remained active almost three more decades he didn't reach that level again. He worked on Westerns (Mackenna's Gold, 1969), horror films (Eye of the Devil, 1967), literary adaptations (Huckleberry Finn, 1974) and others. During this time, Thompson directed two Planet of the Apes sequels but was kept most busy working with Charles Bronson, for whom he directed nine films. Thompson's last film was in 1989. KATRIN CARTLIDGE, 1961 - 2002 The news of actress Katrin Cartlidge's death at the age of 41 has come as a shock. It's not just the age but the thought that even though Cartlidge was already a major actress--despite a slender filmography--she held out the promise of even greater work, a promise that so few artists of any type can make. "Fearless" is perhaps the word most often used to describe Cartlidge but emotions are never enough for an actor; much more is required. Director Mike Leigh said she had "the objective eye of an artist" while remarking on her "her deep-seated suspicion of all forms of woolly thinking and received ideas." Cartlidge was born in London on May 15, 1961. Her first acting work was on the stage, in tiny independent theatres before she was selected by Peter Gill for the National Theatre. Cartlidge also worked as a dresser at the Royal Court where she later made one of her final stage appearances. She began appearing in the popular British TV series Brookside before making her first film in 1985, Sacred Hearts. A small role in the Robbie Coltrane-Rik Mayall vehicle Eat the Rich (1987) followed before Cartlidge had her first leading role in Mike Leigh's scathing Naked (1993). Cartlidge never took a safe approach in her films. She told The Guardian that "I try to work with film-makers who I feel will produce something original, revealing and provoking. If something provokes a reaction, it's well worth doing." You can see this in her choice of projects. Before the Rain (1994) dramatized violence in Macedonia in the wake of the Yugoslavian break-up and made Cartlidge something of a star in the area. She appeared in Lars Von Trier's controversial look at redemption, Breaking the Waves (1996), Leigh's sharply detailed story of aging friends Career Girls (1997), as one of Jack the Ripper's victims in From Hell (2001), as a call girl trying to leave the business in Clair Dolan (1998) and in the Oscar-winning film about Bosnia-Herzegovina, No Man's Land (2001). Her last work included a BBC adaptation of Crime and Punishment (2002), playing Salvador Dali's wife Gala in the BBC comedy-drama Surrealissimo (2002) and an appearance in Rosanna Arquette's directorial debut, Searching for Debra Winger (also 2002), a documentary about women in the film industry. Cartlidge died September 7th from septicaemia brought on by pneumonia. By Lang Thompson

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States January 30, 1987

Released in United States on Video October 1987

Released in United States Winter January 9, 1987

Began shooting April 14, 1986.

Released in United States Winter January 9, 1987

Released in United States January 30, 1987 (Los Angeles)

Released in United States on Video October 1987