History of the World Part I


1h 32m 1981

Brief Synopsis

A parody of epic historical and biblical films, including such historical themes as "The Dawn of Man," "The Stone Age," The Spanish Inquisition," "The Bible," and "The Future."

Film Details

Also Known As
History of the World Part One
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1981

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 32m

Synopsis

A parody of epic historical and biblical films, including such historical themes as "The Dawn of Man," "The Stone Age," The Spanish Inquisition," "The Bible," and "The Future."

Cast

Diane Day

Suzanne Kent

Fritz Feld

Lee Delano

Ron Carey

Hugh M Hefner

Howard Morris

Gerald Stadden

Sid Gould

John Gavin

Jim Steck

Eddie Heim

Dom Deluise

Pat Mccormick

Howard Mann

Bea Arthur

Karen Morton

Art Metrano

John Frayer

Deborah Dawes

Cleo Rocos

John Hillerman

James Roddy

Lori Sutton

Richard Karron

Michael Miller

Royce D Applegate

Henry Kaiser

Fiona Richmond

John King

Dom Salinaro

Henny Youngman

Hunter Von Leer

Robert B Goldberg

Stan Mazin

Barry Levinson

Scott Henderson

Janis Schmitt

Ava Cadell

Leigh French

Royce Mills

J J Barry

Michael Champion

Jeana Keough

Gregory Hines

Jan Murray

Bella Emberg

Ira Miller

Jonathan Cecil

Phil Leeds

Mitchell Bock

Heidi Sorenson

Paul Mazursky

Ted Sprague

Dena Dietrich

Mary-margaret Humes

John Myhers

Dennon Rawles

Andreas Voutsinas

Sandy Helberg

Monica Teama

Geoffrey Larder

Pamela Stephenson

Charles Thomas Murphy

John Hurt

Spencer Henderson

Spike Milligan

Jack Riley

Johnny Silver

Jackie Mason

Mike Cottrell

Molly Basler

Sydney Lassick

Christine Dickinson

Madeline Kahn

Mel Brooks

Shecky Greene

Susette Carroll

Rick Mason

Ronny Graham

George Lane Cooper

Sid Caesar

Jack Carter

Earl Finn

Rusty Goffe

David Chavez

Nigel Hawthorne

Orson Welles

Narrator

Stephanie Marrian

Robert Zappy

Milt Freedman

Ron Clark

Bill Armstrong

Kathy Collins

Zale Kessler

Cloris Leachman

Michele Drake

Sammy Shore

Rudy Deluca

Lisa Sohm

Rod Haase

Gilbert Lee

Jilly Johnson

Lou Mulford

Harvey Korman

Charlie Callas

Andrew Sachs

Alan U Schwartz

Eileen Saki

Anthony Messina

Jay Burton

Lisa Welch

Crew

Eric Allwright

Makeup

Mitchell Bock

Assistant Director

William Borden

Location Manager

Mel Brooks

Song

Mel Brooks

Producer

Mel Brooks

Song Performer

Mel Brooks

Screenplay

Ralph Burns

Original Music

Gene S Cantamessa

Sound

Steve Cantamessa

Sound

Maggie Cartier

Casting

Robert Cartwright

Art Director

Gary Combs

Stunt Coordinator

Brian Cook

Assistant Director

Harry Cordwell

Set Decorator

Stuart Cornfeld

Associate Producer

Phil Cory

Special Effects

Stuart Craig

Production Designer

Alexander Degrunwald

Production Manager

Carol Ann Digiuseppe

Assistant Editor

Chuy Elizondo

Camera Operator

Jane Feinberg

Casting

Mike Fenton

Casting

Les Fresholtz

Sound

Ginger Gemmell

Camera Operator

Daniel Gluck

Set Designer

Robert C Goldstein

Set Designer

Ronnie Graham

Song Performer

Ronnie Graham

Song

Jered Edd Green

Wardrobe

Steven Greenberg

Song

Danford B. Greene

Editor

John R Harris

Music Editor

Jack Hayes

Original Music

Scott Hecker

Sound Editor

Lindsay Hill

Video Playback

Bill Hobbs

Stunt Coordinator

John C. Howard

Editor

Alan Johnson

Associate Producer

Alan Johnson

Choreographer

Petko Kadiev

Production

Jerry King

Key Grip

Steve Lovejoy

Assistant Editor

Daniel E Maltese

Set Designer

Jack M Marino

Property Master

Elliot Marks

Photography

George A Martin

Assistant Editor

Nancy Martinelli

Wardrobe

Vivian Mcateer

Hair

Richard Mckenzie

Set Designer

Harold Michelson

Production Designer

Lillian Michelson

Researcher

Anthony Mondello

Set Decorator

John Morgan

Camera Operator

John Morris

Music

David Murphy

Wardrobe Supervisor

Terry Needham

Location Manager

Norman Newberry

Art Director

Robert Norin

Makeup

Patricia Norris

Costume Designer

Betsy Norton

Script Supervisor

Woody Omens

Director Of Photography

Loretta Ordewer

Production Coordinator

Arthur Piantadosi

Sound

Gregory Pickrell

Set Designer

Judi Rosner

Production Coordinator

Tex Rudloff

Sound

Robert R Rutledge

Sound Editor

Michael Sale

Sound

David Siegel

Production Assistant

Ralph Singleton

Production Manager

Michael Stevenson

Assistant Director

Bo Welch

Set Designer

Albert Whitlock

Special Effects

Paul Wilson

Camera Operator

Jerry Ziesmer

Assistant Director

Film Details

Also Known As
History of the World Part One
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1981

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 32m

Articles

Gregory Hines, 1946-2003


Gregory Hines, the lithe, elegant entertainer who trilled audiences on stage, film and television, died of cancer on August 9 in Los Angeles. He was 57.

Born Gregory Oliver Hines on February 14, 1946, in New York City, he began taking dance lessons at age three and by the time he was six he and his brother Maurice were performing jazz tap at Harlem's Apollo Theater. By 1954, Hines was already on Broadway when he joined the cast of the Broadway musical The Girl in Pink Tights. He then spent the next 20 years perfecting the craft and art of tap dancing as he toured with his brother and father Maurice Sr. in a nightclub circuit act called "Hines, Hines and Dad", before he left in 1973 to form a rock band called Severance in Southern California.

Itching to put his dancing shoes on again, Hines made it back to New York a few years later and in 1978, scored his first Broadway success with Eubie, and earned a Tony nomination. With his vitality, charm and grace, Hines became one of the leading lights on Broadway for the next few years, as exemplified by two more Broadway hits in Comin' Uptown (1980) and Sophisticated Ladies (1981), for which he received two more Tony nominations for his performances.

His charismatic presence made him natural for films, and he notched his first film role as a last minute replacement for Richard Pryor in Mel Brooks' History of the World, Part I (1981), where he immediately displayed his sharp comic abilities. Other solid roles followed over the next decade: an unorthodox coroner in Michael Wadleigh's urban thriller Wolfen (1981); a nightclub dancer in Francis Ford Coppola's The Cotton Club (1984); an American defector to the Soviet Union in Taylor Hackford's overheated melodrama White Nights (1985); a wise-cracking cop in Peter Hyam's Running Scared (1986), and as the fast-talking con artist Goldy in Bill Duke's underrated A Rage in Harlem (1991).

He returned to Broadway in 1992 for his biggest triumph, a portrayal of Jelly Roll Morton, the famed jazz composer, in Jelly's Last Jam and earned a Tony Award in the process. A few more film appearances came in the '90's, most memorably in Forest Whitaker's Waiting to Exhale (1995), but Hines found a new lease on his career when he appeared on the small screen. He played a single father in a fine, if short-lived sitcom The Gregory Hines Show (1997-98); was popular as Ben Doucette, a love interest for Grace in the hugely popular show Will & Grace for two seasons (1999-2001); and received strong critical notice for his moving take as Bill "Bojangles" Robinson in the television film Bojangles (2001) that he also produced. His last televised appearance was in June 2002, when he co-hosted the Tony Awards with Bernadette Peters. In addition to his father and brother, he is survived by his fiancee Negrita Jayde; a daughter, Daria Hines; a son, Zach; a stepdaughter, Jessica Koslow; and a grandson.

by Michael T. Toole
Gregory Hines, 1946-2003

Gregory Hines, 1946-2003

Gregory Hines, the lithe, elegant entertainer who trilled audiences on stage, film and television, died of cancer on August 9 in Los Angeles. He was 57. Born Gregory Oliver Hines on February 14, 1946, in New York City, he began taking dance lessons at age three and by the time he was six he and his brother Maurice were performing jazz tap at Harlem's Apollo Theater. By 1954, Hines was already on Broadway when he joined the cast of the Broadway musical The Girl in Pink Tights. He then spent the next 20 years perfecting the craft and art of tap dancing as he toured with his brother and father Maurice Sr. in a nightclub circuit act called "Hines, Hines and Dad", before he left in 1973 to form a rock band called Severance in Southern California. Itching to put his dancing shoes on again, Hines made it back to New York a few years later and in 1978, scored his first Broadway success with Eubie, and earned a Tony nomination. With his vitality, charm and grace, Hines became one of the leading lights on Broadway for the next few years, as exemplified by two more Broadway hits in Comin' Uptown (1980) and Sophisticated Ladies (1981), for which he received two more Tony nominations for his performances. His charismatic presence made him natural for films, and he notched his first film role as a last minute replacement for Richard Pryor in Mel Brooks' History of the World, Part I (1981), where he immediately displayed his sharp comic abilities. Other solid roles followed over the next decade: an unorthodox coroner in Michael Wadleigh's urban thriller Wolfen (1981); a nightclub dancer in Francis Ford Coppola's The Cotton Club (1984); an American defector to the Soviet Union in Taylor Hackford's overheated melodrama White Nights (1985); a wise-cracking cop in Peter Hyam's Running Scared (1986), and as the fast-talking con artist Goldy in Bill Duke's underrated A Rage in Harlem (1991). He returned to Broadway in 1992 for his biggest triumph, a portrayal of Jelly Roll Morton, the famed jazz composer, in Jelly's Last Jam and earned a Tony Award in the process. A few more film appearances came in the '90's, most memorably in Forest Whitaker's Waiting to Exhale (1995), but Hines found a new lease on his career when he appeared on the small screen. He played a single father in a fine, if short-lived sitcom The Gregory Hines Show (1997-98); was popular as Ben Doucette, a love interest for Grace in the hugely popular show Will & Grace for two seasons (1999-2001); and received strong critical notice for his moving take as Bill "Bojangles" Robinson in the television film Bojangles (2001) that he also produced. His last televised appearance was in June 2002, when he co-hosted the Tony Awards with Bernadette Peters. In addition to his father and brother, he is survived by his fiancee Negrita Jayde; a daughter, Daria Hines; a son, Zach; a stepdaughter, Jessica Koslow; and a grandson. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer June 12, 1981

Re-released in United States on Video January 12, 1994

Formerly distributed by Key Video.

Released in United States Summer June 12, 1981

Re-released in United States on Video January 12, 1994