G. I. Honeymoon


1h 10m 1945

Film Details

Release Date
Apr 6, 1945
Premiere Information
Brooklyn, NY opening: week of 15 Mar 1945
Production Company
Monogram Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Monogram Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on a play by A. J. Rubien, Robert Chapin and Marion Page Johnson (production undetermined).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 10m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6,285ft (8 reels)

Synopsis

Seconds before he is officially wed to his bride Ann, Lt. Robert Gordon receives a telegram ordering him to leave immediately for his military base in Faber, Nevada. Bob and the understanding Ann hastily complete their vows, then say a quick farewell. Soon after, Ann's aunt, Lavinia Thorndyke, advises Ann to catch Bob's train and not delay her honeymoon. On board the packed train, Ann tricks an amorous stranger into giving up his drawing room by flirting with him and then threatening to report him for harassing her. Ann and Bob's wedding night is soon interrupted when Bob is called to officer duty for the remainder of the trip. Once in Faber, Bob reports to Camp Dixon while Ann hunts for an apartment in the crowded town. Ann connives her way into a spacious apartment, unaware that it is a temporary front for a gambling house and the landlord is the amorous stranger, Ace Renaldo. Ann's romantic plans are dashed once more when Bob is ordered to participate in a three-day hike. To celebrate his return, Ann prepares a special meal, but Bob is so exhausted from walking that he falls asleep before dinner. The next morning, Ann dutifully hurries Bob off to camp and agrees to host a cocktail party for his fellow officers that afternoon. As soon as Bob leaves for camp, however, Ann learns that the apartment building has been tagged as off limits by the military. Ann convinces Ace's dim-witted assistant, Horace P. "Blubber" Malloy, to take down the off-limits sign whenever one of Bob's officers shows up, then replace it before the Military Police discover it missing. Blubber relates the scheme to Ace, who dismisses it as dangerously idiotic until he finally meets Ann face to face. Eager to exact revenge on Ann for deceiving him, Ace gets the word out that his casino will be open for business, then notifies Camp Dixon's Military Police about the place. Shortly before Bob's officers are to arrive, a dozen soldiers show up at the apartment, having been instructed to say "the lieutenant sent me" at the door. Blubber and a confused Ann welcome the men, who devour her food and drink, but when one of them spots Col. Hammerhead Smith pulling up to the building, they all panic and hide. Ann covers for the soldiers, baffling Bob and his guests with her nervous, erratic behavior. Finally, one of the wives guesses that Ann is pregnant, and Bob is stunned by the "news." Ann, who has been warned by Blubber about the impending raid, uses the misunderstanding to convince her guests to leave. Just then, however, the Military Police arrive and the soldiers are detected. After Smith orders Bob arrested, Ann is inconsolable until Aunt Lavinia shows up and makes a call to the colonel, who happens to be an old flame. Reminding him of the off-limits trysts they enjoyed during World War I, Lavinia convinces Smith of Bob's innocence. Smith orders the ban on the apartment lifted, and Bob is released and given a forty-eight hour pass. As the reunited couple kiss, however, they hear a radio announcement ordering Bob back to camp. Ann faints with disappointment, and Bob asks the audience for a glass of water.

Film Details

Release Date
Apr 6, 1945
Premiere Information
Brooklyn, NY opening: week of 15 Mar 1945
Production Company
Monogram Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Monogram Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on a play by A. J. Rubien, Robert Chapin and Marion Page Johnson (production undetermined).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 10m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6,285ft (8 reels)

Award Nominations

Best Score

1945

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The film opens with a brief written foreword. All of the writing and production credits were missing from the viewed print. Some of the above credits were taken from copyright material and reviews. Hollywood Reporter news items list the following actors as cast members: Dick Elliott, Ben Hall, Ralph Linn, Robert Emmett Keane, Harry Strang, Robert Barron and Terry Frost. Dick Elliott was not seen in the viewed print; the appearance of the other actors has not been confirmed. For his work on this picture, Edward J. Kay received an Academy Award nomination in the Music (Music Score of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture) category.