Eating Raoul


1h 23m 1982
Eating Raoul

Brief Synopsis

A Los Angeles couple discover a bizarre way to fund their new restaurant.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Comedy
Dark Comedy
Release Date
1982
Production Company
Glen Glenn Sound Company
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox; 20th Century Fox Distribution; CBS Video; Virgin Vision

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 23m

Synopsis

A straight-laced couple starts murdering obnoxious sexual swingers to realize their dream of opening a restaurant.

Crew

Bruce Barbour

Stunts

Paul Bartel

Screenwriter

Robert Beltran

Song ("El Amante Triste")

Jonathan Beres

Song Performer ("Exactly Like You")

Richard Blackburn

Screenwriter

Richard Blackburn

Song ("Doggy King Commercial")

Richard Blackburn

Associate Producer

Richard Blackburn

Stunts

Richard Blackburn

Associate Producer

Richard Blackburn

Song

Richard Blackburn

Stunts

Richard Blackburn

Screenplay

Loma Lee Brookbank

Props

Pamela Carter

Production Coordinator

Jon Daughterty

Production Assistant

Gordon Day

Sound Rerecording

Bob Dennison

Stills (End)

Katherine Dover

Costumes

Paula Einstein

Trailer Editor

Mitchell Factor

Assistant Director

Tod Feuerman

Trailer Editor

Dorothy Fields

Song ("Exactly Like You")

Michael Goodwin

Other

Gary Graver

Camera Operator 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

Ador Greenman

Other

Karen Grossman

Additional Photography

Rose Gurrola

Production Assistant

Ira Halberstadt

Assistant Director

Mike Hickman

Erotic Graphics

Dorothy Hungerford

Production Assistant

Anne Kimmel

Producer

Peter Knowlton

Hairstyles

Peter Knowlton

Makeup Effects

Val Kuklowsky

Sound Editor

John Landis

Assistance

Gary M Lapoten

Unit Production Manager

Gary M Lapoten

Assistant Director

Frederick Long

Song ("Devil With A Blue Dress On")

Kool Lusky

Other

Kim Maxwell

Production Assistant

Jimmy Mchugh

Song ("Exactly Like You")

Tracy Neftzger

Key Grip

John Norman

Sound Rerecording

Arlon Ober

Songs ("El Amante Triste" "Gimme That Cash Jack" "Doggy King Commercial")

Arlon Ober

Music

Frank Pope

Special Effects (Pyrotechnic)

Gideon Porath

Production Assistant

Sharron Reynolds

Script Supervisor

Anthony Santa Croce

Sound Recording

Robert Schulenberg

Production Designer

Robert Schulenberg

Main Titles

Bruce Scott

Song Performer ("Gimme That Cash Jack")

Rick Seaman

Stunts

William Stevenson

Song ("Devil With A Blue Dress On")

Denny Tedesco

Set Dresser

Gary Thieltges

Director Of Photography

Alan Toomayan

Editor

Jor Van Kline

Production Assistant

Christopher T Welch

Sound Editor

Stan Wetzel

Sound Rerecording

Gigi Williams

Additional Makeup

John Wilson

Trailer Editor

Film Details

MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Comedy
Dark Comedy
Release Date
1982
Production Company
Glen Glenn Sound Company
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox; 20th Century Fox Distribution; CBS Video; Virgin Vision

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 23m

Articles

Eating Raoul


An L.A. couple design a bizarre way to get funding for their new restaurant.
Eating Raoul

Eating Raoul

An L.A. couple design a bizarre way to get funding for their new restaurant.

Hamilton Camp (1934-2005)


Hamilton Camp, the diminutive yet effervescent actor and singer-songwriter, who spent nearly his entire life in show business, including several appearances in both television and films, died of a heart attack on October 2 at his Los Angeles home. He was 70.

He was born October 30, 1934, in London, England. After World War II, he moved to Canada and then to Long Beach with his mother and sister, where the siblings performed in USO shows. In 1946, he made his first movie, Bedlam starring Boris Karloff as an extra (as Bobby Camp) and continued in that vein until he played Thorpe, one of Dean Stockwell's classmates in Kim (1950).

After Kim he received some more slightly prominent parts in films: a messenger boy in Titanic (1953); and a mailroom attendant in Executive Suite (1954), but overall, Camp was never a steadily working child actor.

Camp relocated to Chicago in the late '50s and rediscovered his childhood passion - music. He began playing in small clubs around the Chicago area, and he struck oil when he partnered with a New York based folk artist, Bob Gibson in 1961. The pair worked in clubs all over the midwest and they soon became known for their tight vocal harmonies and Gibson's 12-string guitar style. Late in 1961, they recorded an album - Gibson and Camp at the Gate of Horn, the Gate of Horn being the most renowned music venue in Chicago for the burgeoning folk scene. The record may have aged a bit over the years, but it is admired as an important progress in folk music by most scholars, particularly as a missing link between the classic era of Woody Guthrie and the modern singer-songwriter genre populated by Bob Dylan and Joan Baez.

Gibson and Camp would split within two years, and after recording some albums as a solo artist and a brief stint with Chicago's famed Second City improvisational comedy troupe, Camp struck out on his own to work as an actor in Los Angeles. His changed his name to Hamilton from Bob, and despite his lack of vertical presence (he stood only 5-foot-2), his boundless energy and quick wit made him handy to guest star in a string of familiar sitcoms of the late '60s: The Monkees, Bewitched, and Love, American Style. By the '70s there was no stopping him as he appeared on virtually every popular comedy of the day: The Mary Tyler Moore Show, M*A*S*H, Laverne & Shirley, Three's Company, and WKRP in Cincinnati.

Eventually, Camp's film roles improved too, and he did his best film work in the latter stages of his career: Blake Edward's undisciplined but still funny S.O.B. (1981); Paul Bartel's glorious cult comedy Eating Raoul (1982); and Clint Eastwood's jazz biopic on Charlie Parker Bird (1988). Among his recent work was a guest spot last season as a carpenter on Desperate Housewives, and his recent completion of a Las Vegas based comedy Hard Four which is currently in post-production. Camp is survived by six children and thirteen grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole

Hamilton Camp (1934-2005)

Hamilton Camp, the diminutive yet effervescent actor and singer-songwriter, who spent nearly his entire life in show business, including several appearances in both television and films, died of a heart attack on October 2 at his Los Angeles home. He was 70. He was born October 30, 1934, in London, England. After World War II, he moved to Canada and then to Long Beach with his mother and sister, where the siblings performed in USO shows. In 1946, he made his first movie, Bedlam starring Boris Karloff as an extra (as Bobby Camp) and continued in that vein until he played Thorpe, one of Dean Stockwell's classmates in Kim (1950). After Kim he received some more slightly prominent parts in films: a messenger boy in Titanic (1953); and a mailroom attendant in Executive Suite (1954), but overall, Camp was never a steadily working child actor. Camp relocated to Chicago in the late '50s and rediscovered his childhood passion - music. He began playing in small clubs around the Chicago area, and he struck oil when he partnered with a New York based folk artist, Bob Gibson in 1961. The pair worked in clubs all over the midwest and they soon became known for their tight vocal harmonies and Gibson's 12-string guitar style. Late in 1961, they recorded an album - Gibson and Camp at the Gate of Horn, the Gate of Horn being the most renowned music venue in Chicago for the burgeoning folk scene. The record may have aged a bit over the years, but it is admired as an important progress in folk music by most scholars, particularly as a missing link between the classic era of Woody Guthrie and the modern singer-songwriter genre populated by Bob Dylan and Joan Baez. Gibson and Camp would split within two years, and after recording some albums as a solo artist and a brief stint with Chicago's famed Second City improvisational comedy troupe, Camp struck out on his own to work as an actor in Los Angeles. His changed his name to Hamilton from Bob, and despite his lack of vertical presence (he stood only 5-foot-2), his boundless energy and quick wit made him handy to guest star in a string of familiar sitcoms of the late '60s: The Monkees, Bewitched, and Love, American Style. By the '70s there was no stopping him as he appeared on virtually every popular comedy of the day: The Mary Tyler Moore Show, M*A*S*H, Laverne & Shirley, Three's Company, and WKRP in Cincinnati. Eventually, Camp's film roles improved too, and he did his best film work in the latter stages of his career: Blake Edward's undisciplined but still funny S.O.B. (1981); Paul Bartel's glorious cult comedy Eating Raoul (1982); and Clint Eastwood's jazz biopic on Charlie Parker Bird (1988). Among his recent work was a guest spot last season as a carpenter on Desperate Housewives, and his recent completion of a Las Vegas based comedy Hard Four which is currently in post-production. Camp is survived by six children and thirteen grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1982

Released in United States April 1982

Released in United States July 13, 1999

Released in United States November 2006

Released in United States Winter January 1, 1982

Shown at New York Film Festival September-October 1982.

Released in USA on video.

John Landis has a bit part in the film.

Released in United States 1982 (Shown at FILMEX: Los Angeles International Film Exposition (Contemporary Cinema) March 16 - April 1, 1982.)

Released in United States 1982 (Shown at New York Film Festival September-October 1982.)

Released in United States Winter January 1, 1982

Released in United States November 2006 (Shown at AFI/Los Angeles Film Festival (20 Years of AFI Fest) November 1-12, 2006.)

Released in United States April 1982

Released in United States July 13, 1999 (Shown in Los Angeles (American Cinematheque) as part of series "The Alternative Screen: A Forum For Independent Film Exhibition and Beyond..." July 13, 1999.)