The Distinguished Gentleman


1h 45m 1992

Brief Synopsis

A conman is elected to Congress where he takes advantage of his power to the fullest, until he falls in love with a lobbyist who tries to make him do something worthwhile.

Film Details

Also Known As
Distinguished Gentleman, Varning Washington
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Comedy
Political
Release Date
1992
Production Company
Dwight B Brown
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Baltimore, Maryland, USA; Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Washington, DC, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 45m

Synopsis

A conman is elected to Congress where he takes advantage of his power to the fullest, until he falls in love with a lobbyist who tries to make him do something worthwhile.

Crew

Jan H. Aaris

Special Effects Coordinator

Phil Abraham

Assistant Camera Operator

Ellen Adolph

Production Accountant

Milton Ager

Song

Elton Ahi

Assistant

Derek Allen

Song

Tesa Anderson

Production

Jess Anscott

Other

Royce D Applegate

Adr

Steve Artmont

Makeup Artist

Marc Baird

Visual Effects

Olivia Baker

Driver

Ed Bannon

Sound Editor

Gabriel Beristain

Director Of Photography

Gabriel Beristain

Dp/Cinematographer

Lark Bernini

Production Coordinator

Levon Besnelian

Dolly Grip

Wayne Bilyard

Wardrobe Assistant

Gaston Biraben

Sound Editor

R Michael Bisetti

Effects Assistant

Burton Dale Bobbitt

Production Assistant

Russell Bobbitt

Property Master

Chuckii Booker

Song Performer

Chuckii Booker

Song

James A Borgardt

Adr Editor

Mark Bourgeois

Assistant Editor

Paul Bowman

Production Assistant

Linda Boyland

Wardrobe Assistant

Irene Brafstein

Other

Tom Briggs

Transportation Captain

Elizabeth Brikowski

Wardrobe Assistant

George D Brooks

Production Assistant

Dwight B Brown

Cable Operator

Ron Brown

Driver

Thomas Brunelle

Adr

Scott Bruza

On-Set Dresser

Thomas R Bryant

Sound Editor

Gary Bumbry

Driver

Dieter Busch

Production Assistant

John J Cahill

Driver

Steve Callas

Construction Coordinator

David E Campbell

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

John Campbell

Driver

Frank Capra

Assistant Director

Jonathan Capra

Production Assistant

Tom Carlson

Music Editor

Terry Carra

Assistant

Lee Carrick

Grip

Michael Castellano

Set Costumer

Carl Catanese

Swing Gang

Algric Leo Chaplin

Assistant Director

Philip Chapnick

Assistant Property Master

John Chickanis

Electrician

June Christopher

Adr

T W Chu

Assistant Camera Operator

Alan Colbert

Other

Fetteroff Colen

Costumes

Mike Connelly

Driver

Daryle Conners

Production

Dorree Cooper

Set Decorator

Richard Corwin

Dialogue Editor

Doug Cowden

Grip

John Crowder

Location Assistant

Gabriel Cubos

Other

Desiree Dacosta

Assistant

Joey Davis

Assistant Property Master

Sandy De Crescent

Music Contractor

David Degeus

Assistant Editor

Joey Delpo

Production Assistant

Leslie Dilley

Production Designer

Nathaniel Dunn

Grip

Randy Edelman

Music Conductor

Randy Edelman

Music

Anthony Esposito

Hair Stylist

Debbie Esteves

Production Assistant

Sheila Evers

Makeup

Paul G. Farmer

Sound

Michael Fitzpatrick

Costumes

Richard Foreman

Photography

Leigh French

Adr

Rodney G French

Grip

Kenneth Frith

Production Assistant

Rusty Gardner

Best Boy

David Gertz

Foley Mixer

Leonard Goldberg

Producer

Mary Goldberg

Casting

Judith E Goldman

Production Assistant

Susan C Gotschall

Craft Service

William J Gray

Rigging Gaffer

Scott A Green

Projectionist

Skipper Greer

Assistant

David Lee Hagberg

Sound Editor

Wendy S Hallin

Casting

T William Hanson

Thanks

Jerelyn J Harding

Adr Editor

Deborah Harman

On-Set Dresser

Norm Harris

Driver

Susan Harrison

Production Assistant

Paul Hauser

Electrician

Kim Heath

Dolly Grip

Ellen Hench

Driver

Jack Hess

Driver

Phil Hess

Sound Editor

Mike Hodges

Grip

Miriam Holder Jacobs

Assistant Production Coordinator

Sharon G Hollis

Driver

Ronald Bruce Holtman

Craft Service

William Hooper

Sound Editor

Andrew Huang

Production Assistant

Geoff Hubbard

Set Designer

Lawrence Hubbs

Set Designer

Jessica Hyman

Production Assistant

Paul S Iski

Grip

Michael Lee Jamison

Set Costumer

Francine Jamison-tanchuck

Costume Designer

Fred Jedkins

Sound Editor

Donnie Johnson

Production Assistant

Roussell Johnson

Tailor

Lenny Jones

Production Assistant

Scott Julion

Hair Stylist

Robert Kaiser

Color Timer

Doc Kane

Adr Mixer

Marty Kaplan

Story By

Marty Kaplan

From Story

Marty Kaplan

Screenplay

Marty Kaplan

Executive Producer

Mike Keeltz

Grip

Rashon Khan

Security

Lynn Kibler

Other

Dave Kinnoin

Driver

Jonathan Klein

Adr Editor

Christopher Kroll

Assistant Editor

John C Kruize

Accounting Assistant

Cherylann Kuskowski

Production Assistant

Cindy Lagerstrom

Electrician

Elizabeth Lapp

Set Designer

Paul Lasaine

Matte Painter

Jeff Laszlo

Camera Operator

Frank Latorre

Production Assistant

Robin M Lawson

Production Assistant

Brian Legrady

Assistant Camera Operator

Barry B Leirer

Editor

Amy E. Lippens

Casting Associate

Anthony S Lloyd

Makeup Artist

Peter Locaccio

Production Assistant

William Locke

Production Assistant

Tony Lombardo

Editor

Gino Lombardo-silano

Assistant Editor

Bill Luehm

Driver

Edward Lynn

Production Assistant

Ed Maloney

Electrician

Stephen Mapel

Production Associate

Phil Marshall

Song

Jeff Mart

Steadicam Operator

John H. Maxwell

On-Set Dresser

Crispin D May

Production Assistant

Patrick Mcallister

Generator Operator

Edward T. Mcavoy

Assistant Art Director

William M. Mcconnell

Swing Gang

Lawren Mcdonald

Driver

Nick Mclean

Assistant Camera Operator

Greig Mcritchie

Original Music

Murray Miller

Location Manager

John Mills

Swing Gang

Richard Mirisch

Production Associate

Theresa Repola Mohammed

Negative Cutting

James Moriana

Foley Artist

Larry Motes

Driver

Patrick Paul Mullane

Apprentice

John W Murphy

Grip

Ray Murphy

Assistant

Michael W Murray

Other

Thomas Needell

Sound Editor

Thomas A Nemy

Other

Carol Ness

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Tina Louise Newman

Assistant Production Coordinator

David W Nims

Dolly Grip

Rod Nunnally

Other

Bruce Nyznik

Foley

Diane O'connor

Art Department Coordinator

Michael K O'melia

Electrician

Angela O'neill

Casting

Alan Oliney

Stunt Coordinator

Eric Olson

Production Assistant

Marco Antonio Orozco

Casting

David Page

Costumes

Elbert Pair

Props Assistant

Crystal Palmer

Thanks

Kit Paraventi

Adr

Eddie Paul

Grip

William Paul

Key Grip

Carl Perkinson

Other

Dan Perri

Titles

Eric Peterson

Camera Operator

Daniel Petrie

Other

Daniel Petrie

Screenplay (Uncredited)

Michael Peyser

Producer

Denise Pizzini Robinson

Assistant Set Decorator

Alan Porter

Other

Janice Melton Porter

Office Assistant

Film Details

Also Known As
Distinguished Gentleman, Varning Washington
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Comedy
Political
Release Date
1992
Production Company
Dwight B Brown
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Baltimore, Maryland, USA; Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Washington, DC, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 45m

Articles

Lane Smith (1936-2005)


Lane Smith, a veteran character actor of stage, screen and television, and who was best known to modern viewers as Perry White on Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, died on June 13 at his Los Angeles home of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which is more commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease. He was 69.

Born in Memphis, Tennessee on April 29, 1936, Smith had a desire to act from a very young age. After a brief stint in the Army, he moved to New York to study at the Actors Studio and made his debut on off-Broadway debut in 1959. For the next 20 years, Smith was a staple of the New York stage before sinking his teeth into television: Kojak, The Rockford Files, Dallas; and small parts in big films: Rooster Cogburn (1975), Network (1976).

In 1978, he moved to Los Angeles to focus on better film roles, and his toothy grin and southern drawl found him a niche in backwoods dramas: Resurrection (1980), Honeysuckle Rose (1980); and a prominent role as the feisty Mayor in the dated Cold War political yarn Red Dawn (1984).

Smith returned to New York in 1984 and scored a hit on Broadway when he received a starring role in David Mamet's Glengarry Glen Ross and earned a drama desk award in the process. His breakthrough role for many critics and colleagues was his powerful turn as Richard Nixon in The Final Days (1989); a docudrama based on the book by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. He earned a Golden Globe nomination for his spot-on portrayal of the fallen President, and his career picked up from there as parts in prominent Hollywood films came his way: Air America (1990), My Cousin Vinny, The Mighty Ducks (both 1992), and the Pauly Shore comedy Son in Law (1993).

For all his dependable performances over the years, Smith wasn't a familiar presence to millions of viewers until he landed the plump role of Perry White, the editor of the Daily Planet in Superman: Lois and Clark which co-starred Dean Cain and Teri Hatcher (1993-1997). After that run, he gave a scorching performance as Reverend Jeremiah Brown in the teleplay Inherit the Wind (1999); and he appeared last in the miniseries Out of Order (2003). He is survived by his wife Debbie; and son, Rob.

by Michael T. Toole
Lane Smith (1936-2005)

Lane Smith (1936-2005)

Lane Smith, a veteran character actor of stage, screen and television, and who was best known to modern viewers as Perry White on Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, died on June 13 at his Los Angeles home of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which is more commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease. He was 69. Born in Memphis, Tennessee on April 29, 1936, Smith had a desire to act from a very young age. After a brief stint in the Army, he moved to New York to study at the Actors Studio and made his debut on off-Broadway debut in 1959. For the next 20 years, Smith was a staple of the New York stage before sinking his teeth into television: Kojak, The Rockford Files, Dallas; and small parts in big films: Rooster Cogburn (1975), Network (1976). In 1978, he moved to Los Angeles to focus on better film roles, and his toothy grin and southern drawl found him a niche in backwoods dramas: Resurrection (1980), Honeysuckle Rose (1980); and a prominent role as the feisty Mayor in the dated Cold War political yarn Red Dawn (1984). Smith returned to New York in 1984 and scored a hit on Broadway when he received a starring role in David Mamet's Glengarry Glen Ross and earned a drama desk award in the process. His breakthrough role for many critics and colleagues was his powerful turn as Richard Nixon in The Final Days (1989); a docudrama based on the book by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. He earned a Golden Globe nomination for his spot-on portrayal of the fallen President, and his career picked up from there as parts in prominent Hollywood films came his way: Air America (1990), My Cousin Vinny, The Mighty Ducks (both 1992), and the Pauly Shore comedy Son in Law (1993). For all his dependable performances over the years, Smith wasn't a familiar presence to millions of viewers until he landed the plump role of Perry White, the editor of the Daily Planet in Superman: Lois and Clark which co-starred Dean Cain and Teri Hatcher (1993-1997). After that run, he gave a scorching performance as Reverend Jeremiah Brown in the teleplay Inherit the Wind (1999); and he appeared last in the miniseries Out of Order (2003). He is survived by his wife Debbie; and son, Rob. by Michael T. Toole

Noble Willingham (1931-2004)


Noble Willingham, the gruffly voiced character actor best known for his role as saloon owner C.D. Parker on Chuck Norris' long-running series Walker, Texas Ranger, died of natural causes on January 17th at his Palm Springs home. He was 72.

Born on August 31, 1931 in Mineola, Texas, Willingham was educated at North Texas State University where he earned a degree in Economics. He later taught government and economics at a high school in Houston, leaving his life-long dreams of becoming an actor on hold until the opportunity presented itself. Such an opportunity happened when in late 1970, Peter Bogdonovich was doing some on-location shooting in south Texas for The Last Picture Show (1971); at the urging of some friends, he audition and won a small role in the picture. From there, Willingham slowly began to find work in some prominent films, including Bogdonovich's Paper Moon (1973), and Roman Polanski's Chinatown (1974). Around this time, Willingham kept busy with many guest appearances on a variety of popular shows: Bonanza, Gunsmoke, The Waltons, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, The Rockford Files and several others.

Critics didn't take notice of his acting abilities until he landed the role of Leroy Mason, the soulless plant manager who stares down Sally Field in Norma Rae (1979). Few could forget him screaming at her, "Lady, I want you off the premises now!" with unapologetic malice. It may have not been a likable character, but after this stint, better roles came along, most notably the corrupt Dr. Fenster in Robert Redford's prison drama Brubaker (1980); and the evil sheriff in the thriller The Howling (1981).

By the late '80s, Willingham was an in-demand character actor, and he scored in three hit films: a border patrol sergeant - a great straight man to Cheech Marin - in the ethnic comedy Born in East L.A.; his wonderfully avuncular performance as General Taylor, the military brass who was sympathetic to an unorthodox disc jockey in Saigon, played by Robin Williams in Good Morning, Vietnam (both 1987); and his good 'ole boy villainy in the Rutger Hauer action flick Blind Fury (1988). His performances in these films proved that if nothing else, Willingham was a solid backup player who was adept at both comedy and drama.

His best remembered role will no doubt be his six year run as the genial barkeep C.D. Parker opposite Chuck Norris in the popular adventure series Walker, Texas Ranger (1993-99). However, film reviewers raved over his tortured performance as a foul-mouthed, bigoted boat salesman who suffers a traffic downfall in the little seen, but searing indie drama The Corndog Man (1998); the role earned Willingham a nomination for Best Actor at the Independent Spirit Awards and it showed that this ably supporting performer had enough charisma and talent to hold his own in a lead role.

In 2000, Willingham tried his hand at politics when he unsuccessfully tried to unseat Democrat Max Dandlin in a congressional campaign in east Texas. After the experience, Willingham returned to acting filming Blind Horizon with Val Kilmer in 2003. The movie is to be released later this year. Willingham is survived by his wife, Patti Ross Willingham; a son, John Ross McGlohen; two daughters, Stari Willingham and Meghan McGlohen; and a grandson.

by Michael T. Toole

Noble Willingham (1931-2004)

Noble Willingham, the gruffly voiced character actor best known for his role as saloon owner C.D. Parker on Chuck Norris' long-running series Walker, Texas Ranger, died of natural causes on January 17th at his Palm Springs home. He was 72. Born on August 31, 1931 in Mineola, Texas, Willingham was educated at North Texas State University where he earned a degree in Economics. He later taught government and economics at a high school in Houston, leaving his life-long dreams of becoming an actor on hold until the opportunity presented itself. Such an opportunity happened when in late 1970, Peter Bogdonovich was doing some on-location shooting in south Texas for The Last Picture Show (1971); at the urging of some friends, he audition and won a small role in the picture. From there, Willingham slowly began to find work in some prominent films, including Bogdonovich's Paper Moon (1973), and Roman Polanski's Chinatown (1974). Around this time, Willingham kept busy with many guest appearances on a variety of popular shows: Bonanza, Gunsmoke, The Waltons, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, The Rockford Files and several others. Critics didn't take notice of his acting abilities until he landed the role of Leroy Mason, the soulless plant manager who stares down Sally Field in Norma Rae (1979). Few could forget him screaming at her, "Lady, I want you off the premises now!" with unapologetic malice. It may have not been a likable character, but after this stint, better roles came along, most notably the corrupt Dr. Fenster in Robert Redford's prison drama Brubaker (1980); and the evil sheriff in the thriller The Howling (1981). By the late '80s, Willingham was an in-demand character actor, and he scored in three hit films: a border patrol sergeant - a great straight man to Cheech Marin - in the ethnic comedy Born in East L.A.; his wonderfully avuncular performance as General Taylor, the military brass who was sympathetic to an unorthodox disc jockey in Saigon, played by Robin Williams in Good Morning, Vietnam (both 1987); and his good 'ole boy villainy in the Rutger Hauer action flick Blind Fury (1988). His performances in these films proved that if nothing else, Willingham was a solid backup player who was adept at both comedy and drama. His best remembered role will no doubt be his six year run as the genial barkeep C.D. Parker opposite Chuck Norris in the popular adventure series Walker, Texas Ranger (1993-99). However, film reviewers raved over his tortured performance as a foul-mouthed, bigoted boat salesman who suffers a traffic downfall in the little seen, but searing indie drama The Corndog Man (1998); the role earned Willingham a nomination for Best Actor at the Independent Spirit Awards and it showed that this ably supporting performer had enough charisma and talent to hold his own in a lead role. In 2000, Willingham tried his hand at politics when he unsuccessfully tried to unseat Democrat Max Dandlin in a congressional campaign in east Texas. After the experience, Willingham returned to acting filming Blind Horizon with Val Kilmer in 2003. The movie is to be released later this year. Willingham is survived by his wife, Patti Ross Willingham; a son, John Ross McGlohen; two daughters, Stari Willingham and Meghan McGlohen; and a grandson. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video May 5, 1993

Released in United States Winter December 4, 1992

Began shooting May 6, 1992.

Completed shooting August 14, 1992.

Released in United States on Video May 5, 1993

Released in United States Winter December 4, 1992