Cry, The Beloved Country


2h 1995

Brief Synopsis

A South African preacher sets out to find his wayward son who has committed a crime in the big city.

Film Details

Also Known As
Cry, the Beloved Country, Llanto por la Tierra amada, Pleure Ô pays bien-aimé!
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Drama
Adaptation
Crime
Period
Release Date
1995
Production Company
Truman Van Dyke
Distribution Company
ALLIANCE RELEASING/MIRAMAX
Location
Johannesburg, South Africa

Technical Specs

Duration
2h

Synopsis

Journeying from the breathtaking green splendor of the Zulu countryside to the dizzying vibrancy of 1940's Johannesburg, this is the powerful, poetic tale of two fathers, one black and one white, bound by a common fate: the loss of their sons. Although neighbors for many years, the benevolent pastor Stephen Kumalo and the wealthy landowner James Jarvis meet for the first time by chance, only to discover a chilling reality: one man's son has murdered the other. In a land shattered by hatred, these two extraordinary men form an unlikely union that transcends the barriers of class and color.

Crew

Umberto Adaggi

Photography

Xavier Arce

Other

David Barkham

Production Designer

John Barry

Music Producer

Gail Behrmann

Researcher

Elke Beukes

Wardrobe Assistant

Eugene Bezuidenhoudt

Assistant Director

Ewen Bogle

Other

David Boulton

Adr

Dirk Buchmann

Other

Charlotte Buys

Foley Editor

Charlotte Buys

Assistant Editor

John Clur

Helicopter Pilot

Conrad Cockcroft

Other

Barry Coetzee

Consultant

Maureen Conway

Script Supervisor

Brian Cook

Stand-In

Hamid Croukamp

Property Master

Harmon Cusack

Camera

Delia Dashwood

Hair Assistant

Liz Dashwood

Hair Assistant

Nicky De Beer

Sound Designer

Peter Deplessis

Best Boy

Elphas Dlamini

Assistant

Mark Dornfeld

Visual Effects Supervisor

Lillian Dube

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Ken Eddy

Camera

Andrew Elliot

Camera Focus Puller

Charles Evan

Foley Artist

Ruy Filipe

Costume Designer

Terry Fletcher

Continuity

Lesley Fox

Post-Production Supervisor

Simon Francis

Gaffer

Fiona Fraser

Dialogue Coach

Andrew Gibb

Consultant

Megan Gill

Assistant Editor

Paul Gilpin

Director Of Photography

Lionel Glass

Projectionist

Akbar Ali Goolam

Sound

Ronnie Govender

Production Auditor

Celia Gritten

Assistant

Sam Groenewald

Steadicam Operator

Mzamo R Gubese

Driver

Imran Hajee

Hair Assistant

Beverley Hamilton

Other

Jane Hamlyn

Production Assistant

Elinor Hardy

Adr Editor

Ronald Harwood

Screenplay

Angelique Hauptfleisch

Assistant

Sharron Hawkes

Adr Editor

Barry Hearne

Assistant Set Dresser

Glenn Hearne

Assistant

David Heitner

Editor

Graham Hickson

Assistant Director

Mali Hlatshwayo

Assistant

Pentrus Hlongwane

Photography

Beverly House

Makeup Assistant

Roland Hunter

Art Director

Jennifer Ivory

Assistant

Avril Jackson

Other

Martin Jacobson

Unit Manager

Paul Janssen

Post-Production Supervisor

Janek Kabielski

Special Effects

Volker Kereinacke

Other

Shirley Kgabo

Wardrobe Assistant

George Knosi

Camera

Clif Kohlweck

Music Editor

Deon Kriel

Other

Charmaine Lautré

Production Accountant

Edwin Lawson

Sound

Ivan Leathers

Camera

Hal Levinsohn

Adr Supervisor

Donnine Livingston

Effects Coordinator

Norman Lukhele

Production

Rosalind Lurie

Main Title Design

Janli Maartens

Other

Stephen Madonsela

Assistant

Ben Madumo

Props

Peter Mahlangu

Driver

Peter Makwela

Other

Luckson Manenzhe

Other

Ivy Maqoka

Other

Piet Maredi

Assistant Set Dresser

Thabo Maseko

Driver

Patrick Mashilo

Assistant

Sipho Michael Masina

Wardrobe

Isaac Mavimbela

Stunts

Geoffrey Mbenge

Stand-In

Sydney Mbutini

Assistant

Tony Mexter

Props

Gavin Mey

Stunt Coordinator

Magda Meyburgh

Assistant Editor

Guy Micheletti

Key Grip

Ivan Millborrow

Boom Operator

William Mills

Wardrobe Assistant

Ernest Mncube

Production Assistant

Chriswell Mngomezulu

Stand-In

Nathan Mokobane

Other

Gabriella Molnar

Makeup

Eric Moloi

Assistant

Amanda Mordaunt

Assistant

Androu Morgon

Consultant

Aubrey Mudau

Office Runner

Shaun Murdoch

Sound

Shawn Murphy

Music

Robert Naidoo

Production Auditor

Dallas Ncala

Lighting

Aaron Ndwandwe

Assistant

Laurence Nepfunbada

Grip

T J Ngoepe

Driver

Kent Nicholls

Hair Assistant

Rose Nkomo

Other

Iris Noble

Wardrobe Assistant

Philip Notununu

Stunts

Nonhlanhla Ntombela

Hair Assistant

Jabulani Ntsibande

Stand-In

David O'reilly

Adr Editor

Gary Odendaal

Hair Assistant

Julie Palmer

Wardrobe

Alan Paton

Source Material (From Novel)

Gillian Pearson

Production Manager

Juliet Phillips

Foley Artist

Mark Phillips

Rerecording

Mark Phillips

Adr

Mark Phillips

Foley Recordist

Jannik Ploughmann

Camera

Greg Poisson

Assistant

Colin Polson

Makeup

Sudhir Prag Jee

Executive Producer

Graham Press

Stunts

Murray Price

Location Scout

Nic Raine

Original Music

Elias Ramaila

On-Set Dresser

George Ramosime

Production

Lucas Ramosime

Office Runner

Rajan Rather

Assistant

Teddy Ravjee

Assistant

Greg Rethman

Assistant Director

Colette Russouw

Dialogue Editor

Colette Russoux

Assistant Editor

Christian Rutherford

Music Coordinator

Hendrik Sebulela

Grip

Gwyneth Seigel

Accounting Assistant

Owen Sejake

Dialogue Coach

Sipho Sifiniza

Assistant

Anant Singh

Producer

Nilesh Singh

Production Auditor

Sanjeev Singh

Executive Producer

William B Smith

Driver

Rick Snowdon

Stunts

Dr. K Soni

Medic

Kate Sopikova

Makeup Assistant

Richard Sprawson

Sound Mixer

Helena Spring

Associate Producer

Peter Spyropoulos

Stunts

Nantie Steyn

Production Coordinator

Gloria Stravino

Production Accountant

Mike Swan

Camera

Rosanna Swinburne

Assistant

Meg Tanner

Hair Assistant

Dr. J Teeger

Medic

Peter Thage

Other

Geoff Tucker

Other

Geoff Tucker

Consultant

Gert Uys

Helicopter Pilot

Jaco Van Baalen

Grip

Hans Van Den Zanden

Other

Luke Van Der Zanden

Other

Truman Van Dyke

Production Insurance

Marina Van Tonder

Casting Director

Dee Walsh

Assistant

Andre Weavind

Assistant Director

Emelia Roux Weavind

On-Set Dresser

Rae Wynne-roberts

Construction

Stefan Zabielski

Special Effects

Film Details

Also Known As
Cry, the Beloved Country, Llanto por la Tierra amada, Pleure Ô pays bien-aimé!
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Drama
Adaptation
Crime
Period
Release Date
1995
Production Company
Truman Van Dyke
Distribution Company
ALLIANCE RELEASING/MIRAMAX
Location
Johannesburg, South Africa

Technical Specs

Duration
2h

Articles

Cry, the Beloved Country (1995)


The 1995 film Cry, the Beloved Country tells the emotional story of Stephen Kumalo (James Earl Jones), a small town preacher in South Africa who embarks on a journey to Johannesburg to find his son Absalom. Kumalo is shocked by the horrors of apartheid in the big city and even more distraught when he discovers that Absalom is involved in the murder of Arthur Jarvis, a white activist for racial justice. Kumalo and the victim's father, wealthy landowner James Jarvis (Richard Harris), both struggle to find common ground as they try to come to terms with the loss of their sons.

Cry, the Beloved Country was the second film adaptation of Alan Paton's highly praised 1948 novel of the same name. It was also the first feature film to be produced and shot in the newly democratic nation of South Africa. The film's producer Anant Singh had acquired the rights to the novel in 1991. However, he delayed production until apartheid had been abolished in South Africa, culminating in the democratic election of President Nelson Mandela in 1994.

The cast and crew of Cry, the Beloved Country knew from the beginning that they were all part of a project that was very special. "Everyone involved in this movie knows that we're doing something important," said co-star Charles Dutton during the shooting of the film, "and that it really has something to do with them personally. The whites as well as the blacks." In the 2002 edition of his autobiography Voices and Silences James Earl Jones notes the same attitude. "The crew was fully integrated," Jones writes. "Because the blacks among them really wanted to be part of this particular movie, they had to put up with the residue of apartheid. You noticed how the white crew chiefs dealt one way with black crew members and another way with white crew members. It was astonishing to see an almost unconscious remnant of the past still existing. But the black crew members tolerated this behavior because they wanted to be part of Cry, the Beloved Country. They wanted to have jobs in the production of an important film, and they wanted to help make it important."

James Earl Jones was thrilled to play the role of Stephen Kumalo, which he counts among his favorites. Co-star Richard Harris was also happy to be a part of Cry, the Beloved Country. "I think the script was absolutely wonderful," he said during filming. "It was one of the most beautiful scripts I'd ever read. And the part, though not an enormous part, it was a key part, and I thought it would have to be played well for the picture to work." In a 1996 interview Harris added, "When I found out James Earl Jones was going to be in the movie, I was pleased. I can see no one else in the world who could play the role of Stephen Kumalo. He is so saintly and dignified...What we did with Cry was play alongside a fantastic cast, work with a gifted director, from a magnificent script. What more could an actor ask for?"

Hillary Clinton and Nelson Mandela both attended the gala premiere of Cry, the Beloved Country in New York, bringing positive attention to the film. "Much of what is portrayed in Cry, the Beloved Country evokes such strong emotions about the terrible past from which South Africa has just emerged," said Mandela at the premiere. "Cry, the Beloved Country, however, is also a monument to the future."

South Africa had high hopes for Cry, the Beloved Country to be the breakout success for its budding film industry. However, mixed reviews and poor promotion, according to James Earl Jones, resulted in the film not getting the attention it deserved. "The distribution company had a choice of putting all their efforts behind Il Postino (1994) or behind Cry, the Beloved Country," he writes in his autobiography. "Because Cry, the Beloved Country did not get an overwhelming reception in its homeland of South Africa, and because Il Postino had a romantic theme they thought was more popular, they ignored Cry, the Beloved Country and gave their heavy promotion to Il Postino. "

While Cry, the Beloved Country may have come and gone from theaters without much fanfare, it is a beautifully realized film. Its heartfelt story, gorgeous location photography and shattering performances by Jones and Harris make Cry, the Beloved Country a true undiscovered gem. "Our film was one of those that almost everybody missed," says Jones in his autobiography, "but it was an experience I cherish." Producer Anant Singh remarked in a 1996 interview that "although apartheid is over, I think this story is more relevant today than ever before. When you consider that Paton wrote at the end of the book, 'the day would come when there would be freedom for all people in South Africa,' I doubt that he imagined it would ever happen in this century."

Producers: Anant Singh, Harry Alan Towers
Director: Darrell Roodt
Screenplay: Ronald Harwood, Joshua Sinclair; Alan Paton (novel)
Cinematography: Paul Gilpin
Art Direction: Roland Hunter
Music: John Barry
Film Editing: David Heitner
Cast: James Earl Jones (Rev Stephen Kumalo), Tsholofelo Wechoemang (child), Richard Harris (James Jarvis), Charles S. Dutton (John Kumalo), Dolly Rathebe (Mrs. Kumalo), Jack Robinson (Ian Jarvis), Jennifer Steyn (Mary Jarvis), Patrick Ndlovu (man 1), Darlington Michaels (man 2), King Twala (man 3), Somizi Mhlongo (young thief), Sam Ngakane (Mafolo).
C-120m.

by Andrea Passafiume
Cry, The Beloved Country (1995)

Cry, the Beloved Country (1995)

The 1995 film Cry, the Beloved Country tells the emotional story of Stephen Kumalo (James Earl Jones), a small town preacher in South Africa who embarks on a journey to Johannesburg to find his son Absalom. Kumalo is shocked by the horrors of apartheid in the big city and even more distraught when he discovers that Absalom is involved in the murder of Arthur Jarvis, a white activist for racial justice. Kumalo and the victim's father, wealthy landowner James Jarvis (Richard Harris), both struggle to find common ground as they try to come to terms with the loss of their sons. Cry, the Beloved Country was the second film adaptation of Alan Paton's highly praised 1948 novel of the same name. It was also the first feature film to be produced and shot in the newly democratic nation of South Africa. The film's producer Anant Singh had acquired the rights to the novel in 1991. However, he delayed production until apartheid had been abolished in South Africa, culminating in the democratic election of President Nelson Mandela in 1994. The cast and crew of Cry, the Beloved Country knew from the beginning that they were all part of a project that was very special. "Everyone involved in this movie knows that we're doing something important," said co-star Charles Dutton during the shooting of the film, "and that it really has something to do with them personally. The whites as well as the blacks." In the 2002 edition of his autobiography Voices and Silences James Earl Jones notes the same attitude. "The crew was fully integrated," Jones writes. "Because the blacks among them really wanted to be part of this particular movie, they had to put up with the residue of apartheid. You noticed how the white crew chiefs dealt one way with black crew members and another way with white crew members. It was astonishing to see an almost unconscious remnant of the past still existing. But the black crew members tolerated this behavior because they wanted to be part of Cry, the Beloved Country. They wanted to have jobs in the production of an important film, and they wanted to help make it important." James Earl Jones was thrilled to play the role of Stephen Kumalo, which he counts among his favorites. Co-star Richard Harris was also happy to be a part of Cry, the Beloved Country. "I think the script was absolutely wonderful," he said during filming. "It was one of the most beautiful scripts I'd ever read. And the part, though not an enormous part, it was a key part, and I thought it would have to be played well for the picture to work." In a 1996 interview Harris added, "When I found out James Earl Jones was going to be in the movie, I was pleased. I can see no one else in the world who could play the role of Stephen Kumalo. He is so saintly and dignified...What we did with Cry was play alongside a fantastic cast, work with a gifted director, from a magnificent script. What more could an actor ask for?" Hillary Clinton and Nelson Mandela both attended the gala premiere of Cry, the Beloved Country in New York, bringing positive attention to the film. "Much of what is portrayed in Cry, the Beloved Country evokes such strong emotions about the terrible past from which South Africa has just emerged," said Mandela at the premiere. "Cry, the Beloved Country, however, is also a monument to the future." South Africa had high hopes for Cry, the Beloved Country to be the breakout success for its budding film industry. However, mixed reviews and poor promotion, according to James Earl Jones, resulted in the film not getting the attention it deserved. "The distribution company had a choice of putting all their efforts behind Il Postino (1994) or behind Cry, the Beloved Country," he writes in his autobiography. "Because Cry, the Beloved Country did not get an overwhelming reception in its homeland of South Africa, and because Il Postino had a romantic theme they thought was more popular, they ignored Cry, the Beloved Country and gave their heavy promotion to Il Postino. " While Cry, the Beloved Country may have come and gone from theaters without much fanfare, it is a beautifully realized film. Its heartfelt story, gorgeous location photography and shattering performances by Jones and Harris make Cry, the Beloved Country a true undiscovered gem. "Our film was one of those that almost everybody missed," says Jones in his autobiography, "but it was an experience I cherish." Producer Anant Singh remarked in a 1996 interview that "although apartheid is over, I think this story is more relevant today than ever before. When you consider that Paton wrote at the end of the book, 'the day would come when there would be freedom for all people in South Africa,' I doubt that he imagined it would ever happen in this century." Producers: Anant Singh, Harry Alan Towers Director: Darrell Roodt Screenplay: Ronald Harwood, Joshua Sinclair; Alan Paton (novel) Cinematography: Paul Gilpin Art Direction: Roland Hunter Music: John Barry Film Editing: David Heitner Cast: James Earl Jones (Rev Stephen Kumalo), Tsholofelo Wechoemang (child), Richard Harris (James Jarvis), Charles S. Dutton (John Kumalo), Dolly Rathebe (Mrs. Kumalo), Jack Robinson (Ian Jarvis), Jennifer Steyn (Mary Jarvis), Patrick Ndlovu (man 1), Darlington Michaels (man 2), King Twala (man 3), Somizi Mhlongo (young thief), Sam Ngakane (Mafolo). C-120m. by Andrea Passafiume

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter December 15, 1995

Expanded Release in United States December 20, 1995

Expanded Release in United States January 12, 1996

Released in United States on Video July 16, 1996

Released in United States 1995

Released in United States May 1995

Released in United States October 23, 1995

Shown at Cannes Film Festival (market) May 17-28, 1995.

Remake of "Cry, the Beloved Country" (USA/1952), directed by Zoltan Korda and starring Sidney Poitier. Alan Paton's classic anti-apartheid novel was first published in 1948.

Began shooting early October 1994.

Completed shooting December 13, 1994.

Released in United States Winter December 15, 1995

Expanded Release in United States December 20, 1995

Expanded Release in United States January 12, 1996

Released in United States on Video July 16, 1996

Released in United States 1995 (Shown at AFI Los Angeles International Film Festival October 19 - November 2, 1995.)

Released in United States May 1995 (Shown at Cannes Film Festival (market) May 17-28, 1995.)

Released in United States October 23, 1995 (World premiere screening in New York City (Ziegfeld Theater) to benefit the Friends of the Nelson Mandela Children's Fund October 23, 1995.)