Caddyshack II


1h 33m 1988

Brief Synopsis

After his social-climbing daughter falls in love with one of the members, a self-made Armenian millionaire tries and fails to gain entry into Bushwood Country Club to please his social-climbing daughter. Snubbed by the hoity toity members, the man retaliates by purchasing Bushwood and turning it int

Film Details

Also Known As
Caddyshack 2, Caddyshack Two, Tom i bollen 2
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1988
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Rolling Hills Gold Resort, Florida, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 33m

Synopsis

After his social-climbing daughter falls in love with one of the members, a self-made Armenian millionaire tries and fails to gain entry into Bushwood Country Club to please his social-climbing daughter. Snubbed by the hoity toity members, the man retaliates by purchasing Bushwood and turning it into a tacky theme park open to the public so that everyone can have a taste of the good life.

Crew

Jon Alexander

Camera Operator

John A Armstrong

Animator

Wayne Artman

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Tom Bahr

Stunts

Alex Barraza

Key Grip

Tom Beckert

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Paula Benson-himes

Production Secretary

Gina Bergstrom

Foley

Derek Berlatsky

Assistant Editor

Tom Bertino

Rotoscope Animator

Chris Blair

Camera Assistant

Joanie Blum

Script Supervisor

Larry Bock

Editor

Jean Bolte

Construction

Janie Bradford

Song

Mike Brady

Stunts

Jophrey Brown

Stunts

Edwin Butterworth

Makeup

Gene S Cantamessa

Sound Mixer

Steve Cantamessa

Boom Operator

Neil Canton

Producer

Jeff Carson

Music Editor

Sean Casey

Visual Effects

Bill Champlin

Song

Tamara Champlin

Song Performer

Tamara Champlin

Song

Terry Chostner

Camera Operator

Don Clark

Camera Operator

Patty Clucas

Production Assistant

Michael Cooper

Visual Effects

Steve Cremin

Stunts

Frances X Crowley

Special Effects Technician

Mike Cunningham

Assistant Property Master

Tom Dahl

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Glenn Daniels

Casting

Jeff Dashnaw

Stunts

Robert A De Stolfe

Photography

Chris Dellapenna

Production

Michael Dilbeck

Music Supervisor

Dick Dova

Special Effects Technician

Brian Doyle-murray

Characters As Source Material

Jodi Ehrlich

Assistant Director

Donald Elliott

Special Effects Foreman

John Elton

Camera Operator

Gary Epper

Stunts

Patricia Zinn Etheridge

Costumer

Marty Ewing

Assistant Director

Bob Finley

Special Effects Technician

Bruce Gaitsch

Song

Karen Gaviola

Assistant Director

William George

Art Director

Brian Gernand

Modelmaker

Michael Gleason

Visual Effects Editor

Michael S Glick

Unit Production Manager

Berry Gordy

Song

Bernard Gribble

Editor

Peter Guber

Producer

James Halty

Stunt Coordinator

John M Hennessy

Dolly Grip

Tina Hirsch

Editor

Ed Hirsh

Stage Manager

Tony Hudson

Construction

Thomas J Huff

Stunts

Cliff Hutchison

Chief Lighting Technician

Charles Martin Inouye

Music Editor

Don Ivey

Set Decorator

Craig Jaeger

Foley

Brad Jerrell

Special Effects Technician

Carroll Johnston

Set Designer

Eddie Jones

Photography

Barbara Kalish

Assistant

Virginia Katz

Assistant Editor

Douglas Kenney

Characters As Source Material

Tad Krazanowski

Construction

Brad Kuehn

Titles And Opticals

Gary Ladinsky

Music Scoring Mixer

Michael Lantieri

Special Effects Supervisor

Dick Lasley

Illustrator

Rhett Lawrence

Song

Tim Lawrence

Puppeteer

James Lim

Camera Operator

Kenny Loggins

Song

Kenny Loggins

Song Performer

Judy Lowry

Assistant

Joseph P Lucky

Art Director

Clif Magness

Song

Barry Mann

Song

Catherine Mann

Set Decorator

Ken Mann

Chief Lighting Technician

Kim Marks

Director Of Photography

Kim Marks

Dp/Cinematographer

Eric Martin

Song Performer

Richard Marx

Adr Editor

Bill Matthews

Production Designer

Patrick Mcardle

Camera Assistant

Russell Mcentyre

Transportation Coordinator

Dwayne Mcgee

Stunts

Michael Mcgovern

Visual Effects Editor

Roberto Mcgrath

Visual Effects Editor

John Mclaughlin

Stunts

Richard Craig Meinardus

Assistant Camera

Mark S. Miller

Construction Coordinator

Thelonious Monk

Song

Rodney Morgan

Construction

Jim Morris

Visual Effects Producer

Claudia Mullaly

Storyboard Artist

John W Murphy

Best Boy Grip

Kimberly K Nelson

Visual Effects

Lori J Nelson

Titles And Opticals

Don Nemitz

Original Music

Ira Newborn

Music

Bob Newlan

Supervising Sound Editor

Kerry Nordquist

Visual Effects

Beth Nufer

Stunts

Ben Nye Jr.

Makeup

Jane O'neal

Photography

Michael Olague

Special Effects Technician

Jeff Olson

Modelmaker

Eileen Omaye

Assistant

Michael Owens

Visual Effects Supervisor

Ease Owyeung

Construction

Martin Page

Song

Chris Thomas Palomino

Stunts

Paul Pav

Location Manager

Jon Peters

Producer

Lorne Peterson

Modelmaker

William Scott Pierson

Transportation Captain

Claude F Powell

Construction Coordinator

Kaye Pownall

Hair Stylist

Harold Ramis

Characters As Source Material

Harold Ramis

Screenplay

Corky Randall

Animal Trainer

Jay Riddle

Animator

Jaime Rogers

Choreographer

R.a. Rondell

Stunts

Martin Rosenberg

Camera Operator

Michael G Ross

Property Master

May Routh

Costume Designer

Robert Rutledge

Supervising Sound Editor

Mark Sadusky

Assistant Editor

Eric H Sandberg

Costumer

Rick Schwartz

Production

Terry Sittig

Rotoscope Animator

Steve Sleap

Puppeteer

Patty Smyth

Song Performer

Dawn Snyder

Set Designer

Mary Still

Costumer

Harry Stradling Jr.

Dp/Cinematographer

Harry Stradling Jr.

Director Of Photography

Robert Stradling

Assistant Camera

Eben Stromquist

Construction

Sharon B Taksel

Production

Marc Thorpe

Construction

Bill Tiegs

Costumer

Peter Torokvei

Screenplay

Pat Turner

Camera Operator

Sean Turner

Animator

Joe Valentine

Camera Operator

Tim Vanik

Camera Operator

Ramona Dorene Villarrial

Production Accountant

Bruce Walters

Camera Operator

Diane Warren

Song

Cynthia Weil

Song

Mary Wells

Visual Effects

Maurice White

Song

John Williams

Song

Sharon L Wilson

Assistant Camera

Ken Zimmerman

Adr Editor

Film Details

Also Known As
Caddyshack 2, Caddyshack Two, Tom i bollen 2
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1988
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Rolling Hills Gold Resort, Florida, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 33m

Articles

Robert Stack, 1919-2003


Robert Stack, the tough, forceful actor who had a solid career in films before achieving his greatest success playing crime fighter Eliot Ness in the '60s television series The Untouchables (1959-63) and later as host of the long-running Unsolved Mysteries(1987-2002), died on May 14 of heart failure in his Los Angeles home. He was 84.

Stack was born in Los Angeles on January 13, 1919 to a well-to-do family but his parents divorced when he was a year old. At age three, he moved with his mother to Paris, where she studied singing. They returned to Los Angeles when he was seven, by then French was his native language and was not taught English until he started schooling.

Naturally athletic, Stack was still in high school when he became a national skeet-shooting champion and top-flight polo player. He soon was giving lessons on shooting to such top Hollywood luminaries as Clark Gable and Carol Lombard, and found himself on the polo field with some notable movie moguls like Darryl Zanuck and Walter Wanger.

Stack enrolled in the University of Southern California, where he took some drama courses, and was on the Polo team, but it wasn't long before some influential people in the film industry took notice of his classic good looks, and lithe physique. Soon, his Hollywood connections got him on a film set at Paramount, a screen test, and eventually, his first lead in a picture, opposite Deanna Durbin in First Love (1939). Although he was only 20, Stack's natural delivery and boyish charm made him a natural for the screen.

His range grew with some meatier parts in the next few years, especially noteworthy were his roles as the young Nazi sympathizer in Frank Borzage's chilling The Mortal Storm (1940), with James Stewart, and as the Polish flier who woos a married Carole Lombard in Ernst Lubitsch's To Be or Not to Be (1942).

After serving as a gunnery officer in the Navy during World War II, Stack returned to the screen, and found a few interesting roles over the next ten years: giving Elizabeth Taylor her first screen kiss in Robert Thorp's A Date With Judy (1948); the leading role as an American bullfighter in Budd Boetticher's The Bullfighter and the Lady (1951); and as a pilot in William Wellman's The High and the Mighty (1954), starring John Wayne. However, Stack saved his best dramatic performances for Douglas Sirk in two knockout films: as a self-destructive alcoholic in Douglas Sirk's Written on the Wind (1956), for which he received an Academy Award nomination for supporting actor; and sympathetically portraying a fallen World War I pilot ace who is forced to do barnstorming stunts for mere survival in Tarnished Angels (1958).

Despite proving his capabilities as a solid actor in these roles, front rank stardom oddly eluded Stack at this point. That all changed when Stack gave television a try. The result was the enormously popular series, The Untouchables (1959-63). This exciting crime show about the real-life Prohibition-era crime-fighter Eliot Ness and his G-men taking on the Chicago underworld was successful in its day for several reasons: its catchy theme music, florid violence (which caused quite a sensation in its day), taut narration by Walter Winchell, and of course, Stack's trademark staccato delivery and strong presence. It all proved so popular that the series ran for four years, earned an Emmy for Stack in 1960, and made him a household name.

Stack would return to television in the late '60s, with the The Name of the Game (1968-71), and a string of made-for-television movies throughout the '70s. His career perked up again when Steven Spielberg cast him in his big budget comedy 1941 (1979) as General Joe Stillwell. The film surprised many viewers as few realized Stack was willing to spoof his granite-faced stoicism, but it won him over many new fans, and his dead-pan intensity would be used to perfect comic effect the following year as Captain Rex Kramer (who can forget the sight of him beating up Hare Krishnas at the airport?) in David and Jerry Zucker's wonderful spoof of disaster flicks, Airplane! (1980).

Stack's activity would be sporadic throughout the remainder of his career, but he returned to television, as the host of enormously popular Unsolved Mysteries (1987-2002), and played himself in Lawrence Kasden's comedy-drama Mumford (1999). He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Rosemarie Bowe Stack, a former actress, and two children, Elizabeth and Charles, both of Los Angeles.

by Michael T. Toole
Robert Stack, 1919-2003

Robert Stack, 1919-2003

Robert Stack, the tough, forceful actor who had a solid career in films before achieving his greatest success playing crime fighter Eliot Ness in the '60s television series The Untouchables (1959-63) and later as host of the long-running Unsolved Mysteries(1987-2002), died on May 14 of heart failure in his Los Angeles home. He was 84. Stack was born in Los Angeles on January 13, 1919 to a well-to-do family but his parents divorced when he was a year old. At age three, he moved with his mother to Paris, where she studied singing. They returned to Los Angeles when he was seven, by then French was his native language and was not taught English until he started schooling. Naturally athletic, Stack was still in high school when he became a national skeet-shooting champion and top-flight polo player. He soon was giving lessons on shooting to such top Hollywood luminaries as Clark Gable and Carol Lombard, and found himself on the polo field with some notable movie moguls like Darryl Zanuck and Walter Wanger. Stack enrolled in the University of Southern California, where he took some drama courses, and was on the Polo team, but it wasn't long before some influential people in the film industry took notice of his classic good looks, and lithe physique. Soon, his Hollywood connections got him on a film set at Paramount, a screen test, and eventually, his first lead in a picture, opposite Deanna Durbin in First Love (1939). Although he was only 20, Stack's natural delivery and boyish charm made him a natural for the screen. His range grew with some meatier parts in the next few years, especially noteworthy were his roles as the young Nazi sympathizer in Frank Borzage's chilling The Mortal Storm (1940), with James Stewart, and as the Polish flier who woos a married Carole Lombard in Ernst Lubitsch's To Be or Not to Be (1942). After serving as a gunnery officer in the Navy during World War II, Stack returned to the screen, and found a few interesting roles over the next ten years: giving Elizabeth Taylor her first screen kiss in Robert Thorp's A Date With Judy (1948); the leading role as an American bullfighter in Budd Boetticher's The Bullfighter and the Lady (1951); and as a pilot in William Wellman's The High and the Mighty (1954), starring John Wayne. However, Stack saved his best dramatic performances for Douglas Sirk in two knockout films: as a self-destructive alcoholic in Douglas Sirk's Written on the Wind (1956), for which he received an Academy Award nomination for supporting actor; and sympathetically portraying a fallen World War I pilot ace who is forced to do barnstorming stunts for mere survival in Tarnished Angels (1958). Despite proving his capabilities as a solid actor in these roles, front rank stardom oddly eluded Stack at this point. That all changed when Stack gave television a try. The result was the enormously popular series, The Untouchables (1959-63). This exciting crime show about the real-life Prohibition-era crime-fighter Eliot Ness and his G-men taking on the Chicago underworld was successful in its day for several reasons: its catchy theme music, florid violence (which caused quite a sensation in its day), taut narration by Walter Winchell, and of course, Stack's trademark staccato delivery and strong presence. It all proved so popular that the series ran for four years, earned an Emmy for Stack in 1960, and made him a household name. Stack would return to television in the late '60s, with the The Name of the Game (1968-71), and a string of made-for-television movies throughout the '70s. His career perked up again when Steven Spielberg cast him in his big budget comedy 1941 (1979) as General Joe Stillwell. The film surprised many viewers as few realized Stack was willing to spoof his granite-faced stoicism, but it won him over many new fans, and his dead-pan intensity would be used to perfect comic effect the following year as Captain Rex Kramer (who can forget the sight of him beating up Hare Krishnas at the airport?) in David and Jerry Zucker's wonderful spoof of disaster flicks, Airplane! (1980). Stack's activity would be sporadic throughout the remainder of his career, but he returned to television, as the host of enormously popular Unsolved Mysteries (1987-2002), and played himself in Lawrence Kasden's comedy-drama Mumford (1999). He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Rosemarie Bowe Stack, a former actress, and two children, Elizabeth and Charles, both of Los Angeles. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video February 8, 1989

Released in United States Summer July 22, 1988

Jackie Mason replaced Rodney Dangerfield as Jack Hartounian.

Began shooting January 11, 1988.

Completed shooting April 1988.

Released in United States on Video February 8, 1989

Released in United States Summer July 22, 1988