Me and You and Everyone We Know


1h 35m 2005

Brief Synopsis

Christine is a lonely artist and "Eldercab" driver who uses her fantastical artistic visions to draw her aspirations and objects of desire closer to her. Richard, a newly single shoe salesman and father of two boys, is prepared for amazing things to happen. But when he meets the captivating Christin

Film Details

Also Known As
Me, You and Everyone We Know
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2005
Production Company
Celluloid Dreams; Film4 Productions; Film4 Productions; Zeta Films (Argentina)
Distribution Company
IFC Films; Abc Distribution; Alamode Film; Alta Films; Artcam; Arthaus (Norway); Camera Film; Cinemien; Fandango; Frenetic Films; Hoyts Distribution; IFC Films; Icon; Icon Uk Group; Icon Uk Group; Mk2 International; Nonstop Entertainment (Nse); Sony Pictures Home Entertainment; Studiocanal UK; Transilvania Film; United International Pictures
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m

Synopsis

Christine is a lonely artist and "Eldercab" driver who uses her fantastical artistic visions to draw her aspirations and objects of desire closer to her. Richard, a newly single shoe salesman and father of two boys, is prepared for amazing things to happen. But when he meets the captivating Christine, he panics. Life is not so oblique for Richard's seven-year-old Robby, who is having a risque internet romance with a stranger, and his fourteen-year-old brother Peter who becomes the guinea pig for neighborhood girls--practicing for their future of romance and marriage.

Crew

Peter Afterman

Music

Darrick Akey

Assistant Camera

Caitlin Alexander

Wardrobe Assistant

Mike Andrews

Music

Amy Armstrong

Assistant Director

Holly Becker

Executive Producer

Brandi Borden

Office Production Assistant

Rich Botchiet

Electrician

Taylor Boyd

Location Manager

Emily Bulfin

Art Director

Collin Butrum

Transportation Coordinator

Peter Carlton

Executive Producer

Marie Chao

Assistant Camera

Chuy Chavez

Director Of Photography

Susie Chin

Art Assistant

Preston Conner

Boom Operator

Jerry D Constantine

Special Effects

Michael Crawford

Line Producer

Juliane Crump

Art Department Coordinator

Scott Davids

Assistant Editor

Andrew Dickler

Editor

Jonako Donley

Office Assistant

Keith Duggan

Camera Operator

Matthew D. Egan

Assistant Camera

Phil Eisenhower

Consultant

Eric Forand

Gaffer

Owen Foye

Best Boy

Sahra Girshick

Office Production Assistant

Erik Gonzales

Electrician

Jesse Gonzalez

Transportation Captain

Rita Gonzalez

Advisor

Sherry Gunderman

Script Supervisor

Charles Ireland

Editor

Keith A Jones

Assistant Director

Miranda July

Screenwriter

Dan Kanes

Best Boy

Carolyn Kaplan

Executive Producer

Lawrence Karman

Steadicam Operator

Scott Keiner

Production Coordinator

Jongkwon Jay Ko

Grip

Matthew Kristenmacher

Electrician

Gina Kwon

Producer

Jennifer Lai

Assistant Camera

Beth Leister

Art Department Coordinator

Yehuda Maayan

Sound Mixer

Yehuda Maayan

Sound

Aran Reo Mann

Production Designer

Hugh Mcaloon

Office Production Assistant

Erin Mccann

Assistant

Kerry Mccarn

Assistant Camera

Erinn Mccormack

Art Director

Meg Morman

Casting Director

Dave Newbert

Grip

Terry Notary

Stunt Coordinator

Molly O'connor

Set Production Assistant

Andrew O'melia

On-Set Dresser

Elion Scott Olson

Assistant Director

Peter Ozarowski

Camera

Stella Pacific

Coordinator

Dominique Phelps

Art Assistant

Elizabeth Pollard

Art Assistant

Joshua Pollard

Art Assistant

Mary Prendergast

Associate Producer

Jon Recher

Set Production Assistant

Zack Richard

Assistant Camera

Kimberly James Rochelle

Set Production Assistant

Carmen Rohde

Art Assistant

Brienne Rose

Music Coordinator

Lauren Rosenbloom

Art Assistant

Lena Rudnick

Wardrobe Department Intern

Jonathan Sehring

Executive Producer

Sara Sharfstein

Coach

Kevin Simmons

Driver

Pinar Sirvanci

Assistant

Mike Skor

Assistant Camera

Rob Spence

Art Assistant

Marlene Stevens

Assistant Production Coordinator

Cecilia Stewart

Grip

Chris Stinson

Unit Production Manager

Michael Stumpf

Steadicam Operator

Phoebe Sudrow

Photography

Grant Taylor

Coach

Grant Taylor

Coach

Meg Taylor

Supervising Sound Editor

Sean Tejeratchi

Graphic Designer

Bryan John Venegas

Set Decorator

Sylvia Vidaurri

Craft Service

Joel Virgel

Office Production Assistant

Christie Wittenborn

Costume Designer

Leo Won

Makeup Assistant

John Wyatt

Art Director

Margaret Yen

Music Supervisor

Suzi Yoonessi

Associate Producer

Film Details

Also Known As
Me, You and Everyone We Know
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2005
Production Company
Celluloid Dreams; Film4 Productions; Film4 Productions; Zeta Films (Argentina)
Distribution Company
IFC Films; Abc Distribution; Alamode Film; Alta Films; Artcam; Arthaus (Norway); Camera Film; Cinemien; Fandango; Frenetic Films; Hoyts Distribution; IFC Films; Icon; Icon Uk Group; Icon Uk Group; Mk2 International; Nonstop Entertainment (Nse); Sony Pictures Home Entertainment; Studiocanal UK; Transilvania Film; United International Pictures
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m

Articles

Me and You and Everyone We Know: An Interview with Miranda July


When writer, director and actress Miranda July started the script of Me and You and Everyone We Know, she thought she "would make it in Portland (Oregon) for $10,000." She didn't think it would be one of the year's more auspicious directing debuts.

The one-time performance artist's debut feature was a hit on the festival circuit during the first half of the year, where it picked up a prize for "originality of vision" at Sundance and a quartet of awards at Cannes, including co-winning the Camera d'Or Award for first feature. Now it's begun its limited domestic release, starting in about 10 cities, with more to follow.

As its title suggests, like such other American independent movies as Thirteen Conversations About One Thing and Lovely & Amazing, July's Me and You and Everyone We Know is about the tenuous links that join people together in sometimes funny, sometimes eerie ways. July's movie features about a dozen main characters, ranging from schoolkids to the elderly, whose criss-crossing relationships form a community.

The relatively big splash this low-budget ensemble drama is making is a bit of a surprise for the petite Vermont native, who's lived on the West Coast since she was four. In addition to performing live and releasing CDs on Seattle's Sub Pop Records over the last decade, her output also included many short films over the last decade, excerpts of which can be seen on her website, www.mirandajuly.com.

But July's feature film crossover was not her goal "in a calculated sense," she says. "It's kind of like when I was in high school and didn't know all the different things one could do to express themselves, the indie film boom was just taking off and I definitely noticed that. But I kind of forgot about it, and went about my business, performing and making films. And each (short film) was bigger and bigger, and I gradually started to think that at some point one was just going to be too long to make in the same way I was doing them."

The independent movies July remembers having the biggest impact on her were sex, lies and videotape and Slacker. "Slacker definitely had a quality about it that made moviemaking seem very easy," she says. "I liked things like that that don't make it seem mysterious."

In contrast to many of July's short films, in which she was the only person onscreen, shortly before Me and You and Everyone We Know one of her last shorts was Nest of Tens, which she calls "very consciously a movie made with other people in it. It's a half-hour, but it has a lot of the same themes, it has kids and adults, some risque stuff. It was a confidence thing, for sure, to have done things that once would have seemed like an impossible feat."

The move from self-contained short films to a commercial feature was helped by July's attendance at the Sundance Screenwriting Lab. She didn't get in the first year she submitted her screenplay, but she did the second. "I began to think that was the only bridge between the world I was then in (and moviemaking)," she said of the decision to resubmit her script. "And it was exactly that. I'd really shown it to no one else, but having all these professionals see it - not so much for advice, because I'd never had advice before - was really good. To see how seriously people took it. I think I needed a certain amount of permission to make the movie."

Ultimately, making Me and You and Everyone We Know wasn't as big a leap forward as July feared it might be. "It felt like, 'OK, the important things are still the same," she explains. "You still have to know why you're doing this scene. It's the same at any scale. But the amount of pressure and distraction is so much greater. And physically, it's a lot harder. I found that the hardest difference. Just endurance. The hours and the energy having to put out all the time. And then on top of it having to look good on the days I was in it. You never really come down."

In the ensemble of Me and You and Everyone We Know, July plays Christine, an aspiring artist who falls for a shoe salesman (John Hawkes of TV's Deadwood) whose marriage has just broken up. While Christine's way of reaching out is direct - she semi-stalks the guy at his department store - other characters try to connect with others online or, in one case, by writing messages taped onto windows.

"Christine has the part of me that's loving and hopeful and verging on obsessive," July said. "But all the characters are so much me. It's just with her there's no metaphor. I'm the guy who puts the signs in the window, too. My script, my movie, is a total sign in the window: 'Look at me! This is kind of perverse, but be my friend.'"

by Paul Sherman
Me And You And Everyone We Know: An Interview With Miranda July

Me and You and Everyone We Know: An Interview with Miranda July

When writer, director and actress Miranda July started the script of Me and You and Everyone We Know, she thought she "would make it in Portland (Oregon) for $10,000." She didn't think it would be one of the year's more auspicious directing debuts. The one-time performance artist's debut feature was a hit on the festival circuit during the first half of the year, where it picked up a prize for "originality of vision" at Sundance and a quartet of awards at Cannes, including co-winning the Camera d'Or Award for first feature. Now it's begun its limited domestic release, starting in about 10 cities, with more to follow. As its title suggests, like such other American independent movies as Thirteen Conversations About One Thing and Lovely & Amazing, July's Me and You and Everyone We Know is about the tenuous links that join people together in sometimes funny, sometimes eerie ways. July's movie features about a dozen main characters, ranging from schoolkids to the elderly, whose criss-crossing relationships form a community. The relatively big splash this low-budget ensemble drama is making is a bit of a surprise for the petite Vermont native, who's lived on the West Coast since she was four. In addition to performing live and releasing CDs on Seattle's Sub Pop Records over the last decade, her output also included many short films over the last decade, excerpts of which can be seen on her website, www.mirandajuly.com. But July's feature film crossover was not her goal "in a calculated sense," she says. "It's kind of like when I was in high school and didn't know all the different things one could do to express themselves, the indie film boom was just taking off and I definitely noticed that. But I kind of forgot about it, and went about my business, performing and making films. And each (short film) was bigger and bigger, and I gradually started to think that at some point one was just going to be too long to make in the same way I was doing them." The independent movies July remembers having the biggest impact on her were sex, lies and videotape and Slacker. "Slacker definitely had a quality about it that made moviemaking seem very easy," she says. "I liked things like that that don't make it seem mysterious." In contrast to many of July's short films, in which she was the only person onscreen, shortly before Me and You and Everyone We Know one of her last shorts was Nest of Tens, which she calls "very consciously a movie made with other people in it. It's a half-hour, but it has a lot of the same themes, it has kids and adults, some risque stuff. It was a confidence thing, for sure, to have done things that once would have seemed like an impossible feat." The move from self-contained short films to a commercial feature was helped by July's attendance at the Sundance Screenwriting Lab. She didn't get in the first year she submitted her screenplay, but she did the second. "I began to think that was the only bridge between the world I was then in (and moviemaking)," she said of the decision to resubmit her script. "And it was exactly that. I'd really shown it to no one else, but having all these professionals see it - not so much for advice, because I'd never had advice before - was really good. To see how seriously people took it. I think I needed a certain amount of permission to make the movie." Ultimately, making Me and You and Everyone We Know wasn't as big a leap forward as July feared it might be. "It felt like, 'OK, the important things are still the same," she explains. "You still have to know why you're doing this scene. It's the same at any scale. But the amount of pressure and distraction is so much greater. And physically, it's a lot harder. I found that the hardest difference. Just endurance. The hours and the energy having to put out all the time. And then on top of it having to look good on the days I was in it. You never really come down." In the ensemble of Me and You and Everyone We Know, July plays Christine, an aspiring artist who falls for a shoe salesman (John Hawkes of TV's Deadwood) whose marriage has just broken up. While Christine's way of reaching out is direct - she semi-stalks the guy at his department store - other characters try to connect with others online or, in one case, by writing messages taped onto windows. "Christine has the part of me that's loving and hopeful and verging on obsessive," July said. "But all the characters are so much me. It's just with her there's no metaphor. I'm the guy who puts the signs in the window, too. My script, my movie, is a total sign in the window: 'Look at me! This is kind of perverse, but be my friend.'" by Paul Sherman

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Winner of the 2005 award for Most Promising Performer (Miranda July) by the Chicago Film Critics Association (CFCA).

Winner of the Audience Award for Best Narrative Feature at the 2005 Los Angeles Film Festival.

Winner of the International Critics Week Grand Prize and the Golden Camera (for first-time director) at the 2005 Cannes Film Festival.

Released in United States 2005

Released in United States 2006

Released in United States January 2005

Released in United States June 24, 2005

Released in United States May 2005

Released in United States on Video October 11, 2005

Released in United States September 2005

Released in United States Summer June 17, 2005

Shown at Cannes Film Festival May 11-22, 2005.

Shown at Deauville Festival of American Cinema September 2-11, 2005.

Shown at Rottterdam International Film Festival (Sturm und Drang) January 25-February 5, 2006.

Shown at Seattle International Film Festival (Opening Night) May 19- June 12, 2005.

Script was developed at the 2003 Sundance Screenwriters and Directors Labs.

Feature directorial debut for Miranda July.

Released in United States 2005 (Shown at Seattle International Film Festival (Opening Night) May 19- June 12, 2005.)

Released in United States 2006 (Shown at Rottterdam International Film Festival (Sturm und Drang) January 25-February 5, 2006.)

Released in United States January 2005 (Shown at Sundance Film Festival (Dramatic Competition) January 20-30, 2005.)

Released in United States May 2005 (Shown at Cannes Film Festival May 11-22, 2005.)

Released in United States Summer June 17, 2005

Released in United States June 24, 2005 (Los Angeles)

Released in United States September 2005 (Shown at Deauville Festival of American Cinema September 2-11, 2005.)

Released in United States on Video October 11, 2005