Pretty In Pink


1h 37m 1986

Brief Synopsis

A working-class girl falls for the richest boy in her high-school class.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Teens
Romantic Comedy
Release Date
1986
Production Company
Charles J Bond
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Synopsis

John Hughes wrote this seminal '80s movie starring Molly Ringwald, Andrew McCarthy and Jon Cryer in a bittersweet love story about self image and social classes. Ringwald plays a girl from the wrong side of the tracks who catches the eye of the rich and popular Andrew McCarthy. But between his snobby friends and her oddball best friend Duckie, played by Jon Cryer, the romance might be doomed.

Crew

Paul Abascal

Hair

Steve Addabbo

Song

Pamela Alch

Script Supervisor

David Anderle

Music Supervisor

George H Anderson

Sound Effects Editor

John Ashton

Song

The Association

Song Performer

Darryl M Athons

Set Costumer

Arthur Baker

Song

Elinor Bardach

Assistant

George Berndt

Adr Editor

Ruth Bird

Sound Effects Editor

Bruce A. Block

Consultant

Don Bolger

Boom Operator

Charles J Bond

Cable Operator

Gary Bourgeois

Sound

Irene Brafstein

Other

Mike Brooker

Grip

Frank L Brown

Property Master Assistant

Bruno

Song

Richard Butler

Song

Tim Butler

Song

Jimmy Campbell

Song

Chris Carpenter

Sound

Dean Chamberlain

Song

Michael Chinich

Executive Producer

Tommy Cole

Makeup

Reginald Connelly

Song

Erik Cord

Stunts

John W Corso

Production Designer

Lauren Shuler Donner

Producer

Dennis Drummond

Sound Effects Editor

Dorian Dunas

Casting Associate

Sam Edelman

Transportation Coordinator

Vince Ely

Song

Andrew Farriss

Song

Jack Feldman

Song

Wayne Fitzgerald

Titles

John Frazier

Special Effects

Matt Freeman

Production Assistant

Tak Fujimoto

Director Of Photography

Gerald Gates

Other

Gary Gero

Animal Trainer

Joan Giammarco

Sound Effects Editor

Michael Gore

Music

Joseph A Graham

Grip

Carol L Green

Assistant Director

Jack N Green

Camera Operator

Robert Grieve

Sound Effects Editor

Gordon Hackman

Swing Gang

Conrad W. Hall

Assistant Camera Operator

Mary Sutton Hallmann

Assistant

Dick Hancock

Stunt Coordinator

Paula Herold

Casting

Danny Hutton Hitters

Song Performer

Michael Hoffman

Costume Supervisor

John Hughes

Executive Producer

John Hughes

Screenplay

Michael Hutchence

Song

Jane Schwartz Jaffe

Associate Editor

Daniel S. Jimenez

Dolly Grip

Jesse Johnson

Song Performer

Jesse Johnson

Song

Art Jones

Craft Service

Neville Keighley

Song

Nik Kershaw

Song

Tony Kerum

Caterer

Duncan Kilburn

Song

Terry Kirkman

Song

Charles Darin Knight

Sound

William Kolber

Assistant

Karen Kovacevich

Production Associate

Maggie Lee

Song

Maggie Lee

Song Performer

Vicki Lemay-jackson

Dga Trainee

John Lennon

Song

Doug Leonard

Song

Stephen Lim

Assistant Director

Marci Liroff

Casting

William A Lowman

Lighting Technician

John Maguire

Production Auditor

Barry Manilow

Song

Barry Manilow

Song Performer

Louis Mann

Set Designer

Richard Marks

Editor

Johnny Marr

Song

Melton C Maxwell

Lighting Technician

Ian Stephen Mcculloch

Song

Julene Mckinney

Set Costumer

Jack Mclean

Other

Mel Metcalfe

Sound

Laurel Moore

Photography

David Moritz

Apprentice

Roger Morris

Song

Joel Moss

Music

Charles J. Newirth

Location Manager

Bob Noland

Color Timer

Kenny Ortega

Choreographer

Jeff Passanante

Foreman

Ronald W Payne

Production Assistant

L Leon Pendarvis

Original Music

John S Platt

Stunts

Jimmy Podrasky

Song

Jennifer Polito

Set Decorator

Paul Power

Production

John T Ramsey

Grip

Otis Redding

Song Performer

Ed Reilly

Lighting Technician

Donna Roberts

Costume Supervisor

Michael D Roberts

Production Auditor

John Robie

Song

P Scott Sakamoto

Assistant Camera Operator

Gary Scalzo

Other

Don Schlicher

Swing Gang

Arne L Schmidt

Unit Production Manager

Chuck Sharp

Other

Winston Sharples

Song

Art Shippee

Property Master

Lauren Shuler Donner

Producer

Steve Sibenick

Grip

Belouis Some

Song Performer

Elena Spiotta

Production Associate

Craig Staley

Swing Gang

Tim Staubs

Grip

Richard Stone

Music Editor

Bruce Sussman

Song

Gene Triol

Swing Gang

Rick Valencia

Transportation Co-Captain

Marilyn Vance-straker

Costume Designer

Suzanne Vega

Song

Suzanne Vega

Song Performer

Gaston Veilleux

Transportation Captain

Jane Vickerilla

Associate Producer

Ellen Vogt

Assistant

Jeanne Weber

Consultant

Bruce Weintraub

Set Decorator

Linda Whittlesey

Sound Effects Editor

Pamela J Yuen

Assistant Editor

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Teens
Romantic Comedy
Release Date
1986
Production Company
Charles J Bond
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Articles

Pretty in Pink


In 1986 John Hughes hit the jackpot again with adolescent audiences when he released Pretty in Pink, a poor girl/rich boy romantic comedy. Hughes' muse Molly Ringwald starred as Andie, a disadvantaged but proud teenager, who wants more than anything to be asked to the prom. The role was written expressly for Ringwald, who also appeared in Hughes' first two films, Sixteen Candles (1984) and The Breakfast Club (1985). The film also featured Andrew McCarthy as "richie" Blaine, and John Cryer as the lovesick Duckie.

Hughes, already established as the "teenpic maestro", wrote the screenplay but handed directing duties over to first-timer Howard Deutch, mainly known for directing music videos. Deutch would collaborate again with Hughes in Some Kind of Wonderful (1987), a film meant to be yet another project with Ringwald, but she rejected the part. This refusal would mark the end of the Hughes/Ringwald working relationship, and the role eventually went to Lea Thompson. But Pretty in Pink had its share of changes and substitutions as well: the original casting choice for the role of Duckie was another Hughes fave, Anthony Michael Hall. Hall, fearing typecasting due to similar nerdy roles in other Hughes pics, turned down the role and Jon Cryer stepped into the pointy white shoes.

The biggest change of the film, however, was the entire ending, which originally had Andie and Duckie end up together. The test screening did not fare well with audiences, and film execs decided Blane instead should be the lucky guy. The entire cast and crew returned to re-shoot the ending, but in the interim Andrew McCarthy had shaved his head and lost a lot of weight to appear in a New York play. Adept viewers will want to look for a thinner Blane with a bad wig! Another change connected with the revamped ending was the musical selection: originally a song - "Goddess of Love" - by the band OMD was to be featured. When Andie ended up with Blane, however, another OMD tune was used instead - "If You Leave" - a move that guaranteed the song immortality at senior proms everywhere.

Pretty in Pink featured an impressive supporting cast, including Harry Dean Stanton as Andie's warmhearted but deadbeat dad. James Spader was perfectly cast as Blane's sleazy best friend; McCarthy and Spader would star together in two more films, Mannequin and Less Than Zero (both 1987). Annie Potts, from Ghostbusters (1984) and Designing Women fame, played Iona, Andie's kooky co-worker. One of the film's dedications was to Alexa Kenin, featured as Andie's friend Jena. Kenin was tragically murdered by her boyfriend shortly before the release of Pretty in Pink. An up-and-coming actress, Kenin had appeared opposite Clint Eastwood in Honkytonk Man (1982). Other significant bit player parts included Margaret Colin as a teacher, Gina Gershon as a snob, Dweezil Zappa as a stoned-out flake, and comedian Andrew "Dice" Clay as a club bouncer.

By and large, Pretty in Pink was panned by critics at the time of its release (One critic, apparently more taken with the soundtrack, advised "See the album."). Over time, however, it has been recognized as a fine effort from the man now called "The Frank Capra of contemporary cinema." The film made an instant and lasting impression, however, on its intended audience - high school kids. And it worked: one would be hard-pressed to find any child of the 80s not touched by the painfully accurate representations of adolescent angst, whether it be the heartbreak of unrequited love or social rejection by the popular kids.

Producer: Lauren Shuler Donner, John Hughes
Director: Howard Deutch
Screenplay: John Hughes
Production Design: John W. Corso
Cinematography: Tak Fujimoto
Costume Design: Marilyn Vance
Film Editing: Richard Marks
Original Music: Michael Gore
Cast: Molly Ringwald (Andie Walsh), Harry Dean Stanton (Jack Walsh), Jon Cryer (Phil "Duckie" Dale), Andrew McCarthy (Blane McDonough), Annie Potts (Iona), Jim Haynie (Donnelly), Alexa Kenin (Jena), Kate Vernon (Benny).
C-96m.

by Eleanor Quin

Pretty In Pink

Pretty in Pink

In 1986 John Hughes hit the jackpot again with adolescent audiences when he released Pretty in Pink, a poor girl/rich boy romantic comedy. Hughes' muse Molly Ringwald starred as Andie, a disadvantaged but proud teenager, who wants more than anything to be asked to the prom. The role was written expressly for Ringwald, who also appeared in Hughes' first two films, Sixteen Candles (1984) and The Breakfast Club (1985). The film also featured Andrew McCarthy as "richie" Blaine, and John Cryer as the lovesick Duckie. Hughes, already established as the "teenpic maestro", wrote the screenplay but handed directing duties over to first-timer Howard Deutch, mainly known for directing music videos. Deutch would collaborate again with Hughes in Some Kind of Wonderful (1987), a film meant to be yet another project with Ringwald, but she rejected the part. This refusal would mark the end of the Hughes/Ringwald working relationship, and the role eventually went to Lea Thompson. But Pretty in Pink had its share of changes and substitutions as well: the original casting choice for the role of Duckie was another Hughes fave, Anthony Michael Hall. Hall, fearing typecasting due to similar nerdy roles in other Hughes pics, turned down the role and Jon Cryer stepped into the pointy white shoes. The biggest change of the film, however, was the entire ending, which originally had Andie and Duckie end up together. The test screening did not fare well with audiences, and film execs decided Blane instead should be the lucky guy. The entire cast and crew returned to re-shoot the ending, but in the interim Andrew McCarthy had shaved his head and lost a lot of weight to appear in a New York play. Adept viewers will want to look for a thinner Blane with a bad wig! Another change connected with the revamped ending was the musical selection: originally a song - "Goddess of Love" - by the band OMD was to be featured. When Andie ended up with Blane, however, another OMD tune was used instead - "If You Leave" - a move that guaranteed the song immortality at senior proms everywhere. Pretty in Pink featured an impressive supporting cast, including Harry Dean Stanton as Andie's warmhearted but deadbeat dad. James Spader was perfectly cast as Blane's sleazy best friend; McCarthy and Spader would star together in two more films, Mannequin and Less Than Zero (both 1987). Annie Potts, from Ghostbusters (1984) and Designing Women fame, played Iona, Andie's kooky co-worker. One of the film's dedications was to Alexa Kenin, featured as Andie's friend Jena. Kenin was tragically murdered by her boyfriend shortly before the release of Pretty in Pink. An up-and-coming actress, Kenin had appeared opposite Clint Eastwood in Honkytonk Man (1982). Other significant bit player parts included Margaret Colin as a teacher, Gina Gershon as a snob, Dweezil Zappa as a stoned-out flake, and comedian Andrew "Dice" Clay as a club bouncer. By and large, Pretty in Pink was panned by critics at the time of its release (One critic, apparently more taken with the soundtrack, advised "See the album."). Over time, however, it has been recognized as a fine effort from the man now called "The Frank Capra of contemporary cinema." The film made an instant and lasting impression, however, on its intended audience - high school kids. And it worked: one would be hard-pressed to find any child of the 80s not touched by the painfully accurate representations of adolescent angst, whether it be the heartbreak of unrequited love or social rejection by the popular kids. Producer: Lauren Shuler Donner, John Hughes Director: Howard Deutch Screenplay: John Hughes Production Design: John W. Corso Cinematography: Tak Fujimoto Costume Design: Marilyn Vance Film Editing: Richard Marks Original Music: Michael Gore Cast: Molly Ringwald (Andie Walsh), Harry Dean Stanton (Jack Walsh), Jon Cryer (Phil "Duckie" Dale), Andrew McCarthy (Blane McDonough), Annie Potts (Iona), Jim Haynie (Donnelly), Alexa Kenin (Jena), Kate Vernon (Benny). C-96m. by Eleanor Quin

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter February 28, 1986

Released in United States on Video February 1, 1989

Re-released in United States on Video July 18, 1995

Film is in memory of Alexa Kenin and Bruce Weintraub. First feature for director Howard Deutch.

Released in United States Winter February 28, 1986

Released in United States on Video February 1, 1989

Re-released in United States on Video July 18, 1995