Two Sisters from Boston


1h 52m 1946
Two Sisters from Boston

Brief Synopsis

Two girls with Broadway aspirations find work in a Bowery saloon.

Film Details

Also Known As
Brighton Beach
Genre
Comedy
Musical
Release Date
Apr 1946
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 52m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
12 reels

Synopsis

In Boston, in 1903, socialite Abigail Chandler performs a piano recital for her friends and dreams of singing at New York City's Metropolitan Opera. Abigail's wish is finally realized when her aunt Jennifer and uncle Jonathan send her to New York to begin voice lessons. Soon after she arrives in New York, however, Abigail becomes disheartened upon learning that her meager allowance is not enough to pay for the lessons she needs. Desperate to make more money, Abigail adopts the stage name Susie Smith and takes a job singing at The Golden Rooster, a notorious beer hall in the Bowery district. Abigail becomes an instant singing sensation at the beer hall and eventually comes to be known as "High C Susie." Meanwhile, back in Boston, Abigail's family reacts with shock and dismay at rumors that Abigail has been seen performing in the Bowery. Determined to learn the truth about Abigail's reputed decline, Jonathan, Jennifer and Abigail's prim sister, Martha Canford Chandler, set out for New York. Jonathan immediately accuses Abigail of "showing her limbs" at a Bowery honky-tonk, but Abigail insists that the rumors are false and that she is performing, as planned, at the Metropolitan Opera. To show that she has made a success of herself in New York, Abigail, with help from her friend "Spike," a Bowery piano player, slips unnoticed into the chorus of the Metropolitan Opera during a performance attended by her family. Her scheme goes awry, however, when she tries to move closer to the front of the stage and accidentally interrupts an aria by the opera's leading tenor, Olaf Olstrom. Despite the performance fiasco, Jennifer, Jonathan and Martha are now convinced that Abigail is doing fine at the opera. Jennifer and Jonathan return to Boston, but Martha, who has discovered Abigail's ruse, decides to stay in New York to keep an eye on her sister. Determined to lead Abigail to a better life, Martha decides that she must encourage her to marry. While busily arranging a romance between Abigail and Lawrence Tyburt Patterson, Jr., the son of one of the city's leading opera patrons, Martha finds herself attending the Golden Rooster with greater frequency, and singing and dancing with Abigail. Martha's plan appears destined for success when Abigail is invited to sing at a reception held at the Pattersons' home. Abigail's performance wins the praise of many of the influential guests, and Martha is satisfied that her sister has finally received the critical recognition she deserves. Lawrence, however, has overlooked Abigail's beauty and talent, and has, instead, fallen in love with Martha. After realizing that Abigail is not in love with Lawrence, Martha allows her romance with Lawrence to blossom, and together she and Lawrence work to ensure the success of Abigail's musical career.

Cast

Kathryn Grayson

Abigail Chandler

June Allyson

Martha Canford Chandler

Lauritz Melchior

[Olaf] Olstrom

Jimmy Durante

"Spike"

Peter Lawford

Lawrence Tyburt Patterson, Jr.

Ben Blue

Wrigley

Isobel Elsom

Aunt Jennifer

Harry Hayden

Uncle Jonathan

Thurston Hall

Mr. Lawrence Tyburt Patterson, Sr.

Nella Walker

Mrs. Lawrence Tyburt Patterson, Sr.

Gino Corrado

Ossifish

Marina Koshetz

Innkeeper's daughter

Wilson Wood

Hugh Tinkerfield

Chester Clute

George

Ben Lessy

Roberto

Vince Barnett

Singing waiter

Eddie Jackson

Singing waiter

Jack Roth

Singing waiter

Norman Leavitt

Singing waiter

Dewey Robinson

Bouncer

Charles Regan

Bouncer

Jack Lipson

Drexel

Katherine York

Flirting girl

Jimmy Conlin

Grandpa Chandler

Jetsy Parker

Bowery chorus girl

Gloria Alvord

Bowery chorus girl

Patricia Denise

Bowery chorus girl

Marion Ackerson

Bowery chorus girl

Ann Cameron

Bowery chorus girl

Sheila Egan

Bowery chorus girl

Virginia Ellsworth

Bowery chorus girl

Carrie Devan

Bowery chorus girl

Judy Brent

Bowery chorus girl

Dona Dax

Bowery chorus girl

Effie Laird

Emma

Clemence Gifford

Innkeeper's wife

Grady Sutton

Fop

Virginia Engels

Big blonde

Kate Mackenna

Old flower woman

Johnny Berkes

Ticket man

Bryn Davis

Fat woman

George Suzanne

Man in booth

George Mann

Tall assistant

Ann Mccormack

Chorus girl

Eddie Polo

Waiter

Fred "snowflake" Toones

Porter

Ralph Brooke

Messenger

Marjorie Davies

Louise

Frank Hagney

Stage hand

Paul Newland

Stage hand

Charles Previn

Orchestra conductor

Cameron Grant

Spectator with binoculars

Skeets Noyes

Other man

Helyn Eby-rock

Woman in gallery

Broderick O'farrell

Usher

James Finlayson

Street cleaner

Chester Conklin

Street cleaner

Audrey Betz

Madame Grenadi

Marek Windheim

Stage director

Richard Kean

Choreographer

Franco Corsaro

Assistant stage director

Jack Deery

General in opera

Jack George

Timid composer

Rudolph Germaine

Court Marshall

Boyd Bennett

Photographer

Jerry Lee

Fat woman in chorus

George Calliga

Opera cast member/Master of ceremonies

Tom Tamarez

Opera cast member

Daniel Degonghe

Opera cast member

Ed Agresti

Opera cast member

Mario Bramucci

Opera cast member

Dina Smirnova

Opera cast member

Symona Boniface

Opera cast member

Helen Dickson

Opera cast member

George Carleton

Guest at party

Percival Vivian

Guest at party

Erville Alderson

Guest at party

James Logan

Guest at party

Billy Green

Guest at party

Betsy Stoddard

Guest at party

Gladys Tierney

Guest at party

Nora Cecil

Guest at party

Dorothy Neumann

Guest at party

Barbara Billingsley

Guest at party

Jessie Arnold

Boston maid

Andrew Tombes

Tall professor

Pete Cusanelli

Fat professor

Byron Foulger

Lab assistant

Tom Pilkington

Lab assistant

Henry Sylvester

Lab assistant

Jack Chefe

Lab assistant

Emil Rameau

Nervous conductor

Tim Ryan

Mr. Dibson

Ralph Sanford

Guard

George Davis

Butler

Frank Leigh

Cardinal in opera

Tom Leffingwell

Priest in opera

Eva Puig

Maria, a hairdresser

Lionel Braham

Opera singer

Sheldon Jeff

Opera singer

Frank Johnson

Opera singer

John Piffle

Opera singer

Ruth Cherrington

Opera singer

Martha Baumattre

Opera singer

Mabel Smaney

Opera singer

Agnes Steele

Opera singer

Maurice Cass

Music master

Mariska Aldrich

Russian opera team member

Michael Visaroff

Russian opera team member

Mayo Newhall

Greek professor

Wheaton Chambers

Greek professor

Antonio Filauri

Italian opera singer

Margaret Bert

Maid

Roy Butler

Guest

Crew

Douglass Biggs

Film Editor

Earl Brent

Composer

Wilhelm Brockway

Unit mixer

Daniel B. Cathcart

Art Director

Myles Connolly

Original Screenplay

Harry Crane

Additional Dialogue

Mark Davis

Matte paintings, Camera

Jack Dawn

Makeup created by

Peter P. Decker

Music mixer

Leo Delibes

Composer

Jack Donohue

Dance Director

Jimmy Durante

Composer

Sammy Fain

Composer

James Z. Flaster

Re-rec and Effects mixer

Ralph Freed

Composer

Cedric Gibbons

Art Director

A. Arnold Gillespie

Transparency projection shots

Sydney Guilaroff

Hair Designer for Miss Grayson

Irene

Costume Supervisor

Henry Koster

Company

A. Lindsley Lane

2nd Camera

Leo Linder

Research Director Assistant

Franz Liszt

Composer

Felix Mendelssohn

Composer

Warren Newcombe

Matte paintings

James O'hanlon

Additional Dialogue

Joe Pasternak

Producer

Charles Previn

Composer

Charles Previn

Music Director

Charles Previn

Operatic seq Adapted from Liszt and Mendelssohn by

George Richelavie

Research Director

Helen Rose

Costume Design

Douglas Shearer

Recording Director

Robert W. Shirley

Re-rec and Effects mixer

Newell Sparks

Re-rec and Effects mixer

Herbert Stahlberg

Music mixer

William Steinkamp

Re-rec and Effects mixer

Michael Steinore

Re-rec and Effects mixer

Robert Surtees

Director of Photography

Valles

Men's Costume

Richard Wagner

Composer

Don T. Whitmer

Re-rec and Effects mixer

Edwin B. Willis

Set Decoration

Ed Woehler

Unit Manager

Wilhelm Wymetal

Composer

William Wymetal

Operatic seq Adapted from Liszt and Mendelssohn by

Dolph Zimmer

Assistant Director

Photo Collections

Two Sisters from Boston - Publicity Stills
Here are several Publicity Stills from Two Sisters from Boston (1946). Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.

Film Details

Also Known As
Brighton Beach
Genre
Comedy
Musical
Release Date
Apr 1946
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 52m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
12 reels

Articles

Two Sisters From Boston


Look out New York. Beantown sisters Kathryn Grayson and June Allyson are out to make their mark on the Big Apple in Two Sisters from Boston (1946). And of course the road to success includes a little romance; the singing siblings meet their matches in piano man Jimmy Durante and opera lover Peter Lawford. It would be the first of four Allyson-Lawford screen pairings; Good News (1947), Little Women (1949) and They Only Kill Their Masters (1972) would follow. An off screen partnership between Allyson and Lawford would also be formed. At the urging of MGM studio head Louis B. Mayer, Allyson dated Lawford (as well as Van Johnson) - but it was all a publicity gimmick to generate interest in the film. Allyson eventually married the recently divorced Dick Powell.

Two Sisters from Boston also teamed June Allyson for a second time with her Music for Millions (1944) director Henry Koster. The Berlin born Koster got his start performing a variety of jobs ranging from children¿s story illustrator to newsreel cameraman. He made the jump first to screenwriter with The Big Opportunity in 1924 and later to director in pictures like The Adventures of a Beautiful Woman (1932) and Peter (1934). But Koster¿s big break came on the movie Five in a Jazz Band (1932) which he wrote and co-directed (alongside a stage director named Erich Engel). The producer of Five in a Jazz Band was Joe Pasternak and he was so impressed with Koster¿s work that he promised the director he¿d work with him on one of his own productions.

In the meantime, Koster was forced to flee Nazi Germany for Paris. But Pasternak hadn¿t forgotten his promise and eventually summoned the young Koster to Budapest to direct some Hungarian releases. Later, when Pasternak was called to Hollywood by Universal, he agreed to go only if the studio allowed Koster to come along. Pasternak and Koster¿s first collaboration for Universal was Three Smart Girls (1936) with newcomer Deanna Durbin. Despite Koster¿s less than fluent English, the movie was a success. It helped pull Universal out of bankruptcy and set Durbin on the road to stardom. Koster would direct five more Durbin pictures at Universal. In 1944, Koster followed Pasternak to MGM where they did Music for Millions and Two Sisters from Boston. Despite their success as a team, it was soon time for Koster to go his own way. He was called on to finish The Bishop¿s Wife (1947) which was already in production. The assignment led to a contract with Twentieth Century Fox, where Koster remained until 1965. Among his best known films are The Robe(1953) which was the first film shot in CinemaScope, Harvey (1950), Flower Drum Song (1961) and The Singing Nun (1966).

Koster would direct Allyson again in the 1957 remake of My Man Godfrey. Years later, he commented on Allyson and co-star Kathryn Grayson in Two Sisters from Boston. Of them he said, "I loved both girls. June was the better actress and Kathryn was the better singer." He would also remember the film Two Sisters from Boston as one of his favorites. Having directed numerous movies with children (for example Margaret O'Brien in Music for Millions), Koster saw Two Sisters as giving him room to grow. Of this film he commented, "It had no children...I could get a little deeper into the life of human beings."

Producer: Joe Pasternak
Director: Henry Koster
Screenplay: Myles Connolly, Harry Crane, James O'Hanlon
Cinematography: Robert Surtees
Film Editing: Douglass Biggs
Art Direction: Daniel B. Cathcart, Cedric Gibbons
Music: Sammy Fain, Ralph Freed, Charles Previn, Jimmy Durante
Cast: Kathryn Grayson (Abigail Chandler), June Allyson (Martha Canford Chandler), Lauritz Melchior (Olstrom), Jimmy Durante (Spike), Peter Lawford (Lawrence Tyburt Patterson, Jr.), Ben Blue (Wrigley).
BW-113m. Closed captioning.

by Stephanie Thames
Two Sisters From Boston

Two Sisters From Boston

Look out New York. Beantown sisters Kathryn Grayson and June Allyson are out to make their mark on the Big Apple in Two Sisters from Boston (1946). And of course the road to success includes a little romance; the singing siblings meet their matches in piano man Jimmy Durante and opera lover Peter Lawford. It would be the first of four Allyson-Lawford screen pairings; Good News (1947), Little Women (1949) and They Only Kill Their Masters (1972) would follow. An off screen partnership between Allyson and Lawford would also be formed. At the urging of MGM studio head Louis B. Mayer, Allyson dated Lawford (as well as Van Johnson) - but it was all a publicity gimmick to generate interest in the film. Allyson eventually married the recently divorced Dick Powell. Two Sisters from Boston also teamed June Allyson for a second time with her Music for Millions (1944) director Henry Koster. The Berlin born Koster got his start performing a variety of jobs ranging from children¿s story illustrator to newsreel cameraman. He made the jump first to screenwriter with The Big Opportunity in 1924 and later to director in pictures like The Adventures of a Beautiful Woman (1932) and Peter (1934). But Koster¿s big break came on the movie Five in a Jazz Band (1932) which he wrote and co-directed (alongside a stage director named Erich Engel). The producer of Five in a Jazz Band was Joe Pasternak and he was so impressed with Koster¿s work that he promised the director he¿d work with him on one of his own productions. In the meantime, Koster was forced to flee Nazi Germany for Paris. But Pasternak hadn¿t forgotten his promise and eventually summoned the young Koster to Budapest to direct some Hungarian releases. Later, when Pasternak was called to Hollywood by Universal, he agreed to go only if the studio allowed Koster to come along. Pasternak and Koster¿s first collaboration for Universal was Three Smart Girls (1936) with newcomer Deanna Durbin. Despite Koster¿s less than fluent English, the movie was a success. It helped pull Universal out of bankruptcy and set Durbin on the road to stardom. Koster would direct five more Durbin pictures at Universal. In 1944, Koster followed Pasternak to MGM where they did Music for Millions and Two Sisters from Boston. Despite their success as a team, it was soon time for Koster to go his own way. He was called on to finish The Bishop¿s Wife (1947) which was already in production. The assignment led to a contract with Twentieth Century Fox, where Koster remained until 1965. Among his best known films are The Robe(1953) which was the first film shot in CinemaScope, Harvey (1950), Flower Drum Song (1961) and The Singing Nun (1966). Koster would direct Allyson again in the 1957 remake of My Man Godfrey. Years later, he commented on Allyson and co-star Kathryn Grayson in Two Sisters from Boston. Of them he said, "I loved both girls. June was the better actress and Kathryn was the better singer." He would also remember the film Two Sisters from Boston as one of his favorites. Having directed numerous movies with children (for example Margaret O'Brien in Music for Millions), Koster saw Two Sisters as giving him room to grow. Of this film he commented, "It had no children...I could get a little deeper into the life of human beings." Producer: Joe Pasternak Director: Henry Koster Screenplay: Myles Connolly, Harry Crane, James O'Hanlon Cinematography: Robert Surtees Film Editing: Douglass Biggs Art Direction: Daniel B. Cathcart, Cedric Gibbons Music: Sammy Fain, Ralph Freed, Charles Previn, Jimmy Durante Cast: Kathryn Grayson (Abigail Chandler), June Allyson (Martha Canford Chandler), Lauritz Melchior (Olstrom), Jimmy Durante (Spike), Peter Lawford (Lawrence Tyburt Patterson, Jr.), Ben Blue (Wrigley). BW-113m. Closed captioning. by Stephanie Thames

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working title of this film was Brighton Beach. The picture marked the screen debuts of New York stage comedienne Marjorie Davies and actress Marina Koshetz, the daughter of opera star Nina Koshetz. A June 1945 Hollywood Reporter news item noted that the film was to mark the film debut of model and entertainer Mara Williams, but her appearance in the released film has not been confirmed.