The Manchurian Candidate


2h 10m 2004

Brief Synopsis

U.S. Army Major Bennett Marco can't sleep at night--and he doesn't want to. Marco spends his days giving inspiring speeches about his platoon's ambush in the Kuwaiti desert and the heroics of Sergeant Raymond Shaw, who won the Medal of Honor for saving Marco's crew. But at night, Marco's dreamlike memories of the desert turn sinister and terrifying. And Marco privately wonders whether the two soldiers who died in the firefight might have met darker fates than officially recorded--and whether Shaw might not be the glorious hero that everyone thinks he is. When Shaw takes the national stage as a surefire candidate for vice president--under the thumb of his controversial mother, Senator Eleanor Prentiss Shaw--Marco is forced to act on his growing suspicions. With military officials questioning his sanity, and the net of security tightening around Shaw, Marco races to probe deeper into the unimaginable, shocking truth before the White House is won.

Film Details

Also Known As
Manchurian Candidate, Un crime dans la tête, crime dans la tête
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Thriller
Political
Adaptation
Release Date
2004
Production Company
Kira Smith
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures
Location
New Jersey, USA; New York, USA; New York, USA; Santa Monica, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 10m

Synopsis

U.S. Army Major Bennett Marco can't sleep at night--and he doesn't want to. Marco spends his days giving inspiring speeches about his platoon's ambush in the Kuwaiti desert and the heroics of Sergeant Raymond Shaw, who won the Medal of Honor for saving Marco's crew. But at night, Marco's dreamlike memories of the desert turn sinister and terrifying. And Marco privately wonders whether the two soldiers who died in the firefight might have met darker fates than officially recorded--and whether Shaw might not be the glorious hero that everyone thinks he is. When Shaw takes the national stage as a surefire candidate for vice president--under the thumb of his controversial mother, Senator Eleanor Prentiss Shaw--Marco is forced to act on his growing suspicions. With military officials questioning his sanity, and the net of security tightening around Shaw, Marco races to probe deeper into the unimaginable, shocking truth before the White House is won.

Cast

Denzel Washington

Liev Schreiber

Jeffrey Wright

Meryl Streep

Jon Voight

Vera Farmiga

Dean Stockwell

Julie Adamy

Beau Sia

Ted Levine

Ann Dowd

Kenneth Utt

Josephine Demme

Robyn Hitchcock

Aaron Scoenfeld

Stacey Newsome Santiago

Roger Corman

Joey Perillo

Jane Denoble

Al Franken

Gayle King

Danny Darst

Joaquin Perez Campbell

Tom Stechschulte

Pablo Schreiber

Stephen Richardson

Andre B Blake

John Bedford Lloyd

Stephanie Mcbride

Ed Crane

Gordon Brummer

Leona E Sondreal

James Mccauley

Antoine Taylor

Michael Shehata

Anthony Mackie

Jerry Duplessis

Performer

Joshua Elrod

Craig Branam

Teddy Dunn

Adam Lefevre

Enrique Correa

William Meisle

Sakina Jaffrey

Brad Holbrook

Dave Weinman

Lead Person

Bill Irwin

Robert Castle

Ukee Washington

Jonathan Borst

Sidney Lumet

Fab Five Freddy

Simon Mcburney

David Keeley

Ray Anthony Thomas

David Neumann

Denzel Dellahoussaye

Alyson Renaldo

Anna Deavere Smith

Lilly Mcdowell

Roy Blount

Tim Artz

Lewis Walker

Prue Lewarne

Lauren Roselli

Darrell Larson

Cassius Wilkinson

Michael C Pierce

Duana Butler

Charles Napier

Edwidge Danticat

Walter Mosley

James B Howard

Himself

Dorian Missick

Jude Ciccolella

Obba Babatundé

John Aprea

Christopher Russo

Bebe Winans

Harry Northup

Geovonne Long

Marie Runyon

Forrest Sawyer

Tracey Walter

Victoria Haynes

Kristen Shaughnessy

Zeljko Ivanek

Tymberly Canale Harris

Kate Valk

Marin Ireland

Roma Torre

Molly Hickok

Jim Roche

Reno

Gabriela Fung

Tom Chapin

Eliza Simpson

Big Jim Wheeler

Miguel Ferrer

Paul Lazar

Kimberly Elise

Paul Johnson

Dan Olmstead

Glen Hartell

Neda Armian

Joseph Alessi

Bruno Ganz

Buzz Kilman

Malcolm Simpson

Jose Pablo Cantillo

Crew

Joe Abbatecola

Grip

Robert Henry Adams

Song

Babatunde Adebimpe

Song

Danny Aiello Iii

Stunts

Brian Keith Allen

Stunts

Dave Allen

Song

Nancy Allen

Music Editor

Betsy Alton

Production Coordinator

Bill Anagnos

Stunts

Arthur Anderson

Assistant Director

Roy T Anderson

Stunts

Tara Anderson

Production Assistant

Jeff Atmajian

Original Music

Joann Atwood

Assistant Property Master

Scott Aversano

Executive Producer

George Axelrod

Source Material

Cheryl Bainum

Visual Effects Producer

Heather Baker

Compositing Supervisor

Robert Baldwin

Cgi Artist

Randall Balsmeyer

Titles

Randall Balsmeyer

Main Title Design

Chris Barnes

Stunts

Monica Barraza

Production Secretary

Matthew Frederic Barrick

Song

Peter M Bauer

Song

Jonathan Beck

Photography

William A Beekman

Assistant Location Manager

Bruce Benson

Stunts

Jon Bergholz

Transportation Captain

Peter Betulia

Grip

Michael Betzag

Grip

Jello Biafra

Song

Robert D Blair

Electrician

Barbara Blaisdell

Song

Barbara Blaisdell

Song Performer

Bob Bornstein

Music

Jay Boryea

Stunts

David Boulton

Adr Mixer

Ernest Leif Boyd

Apprentice Editor

Wayne Brackett

On-Set Dresser

Robert Braun

Graphic Artist

Joel Bravo

Song

Louis Bravos

Song

Dawn Bridgewater

Production Assistant

Conrad F Brink

Special Effects Coordinator

Calvin Brown

Stunts

Susie Brubaker

Visual Effects

Susie Brubaker

Visual Effects Supervisor

Manley Buchanan

Song

Manley Buchanan

Song Performer

Tim Buchanan

Stunts

Paul Bucossi

Stunts

Ashley Van Buren

Production Assistant

Mike Burke

Stunts

Hugo Burnham

Song

Eva Z. Cabrera

Script Supervisor

Travis Call

Rerecording

Anthony Calypso

Researcher

John Campbell

Song

Paul Candrilli

Grip

John Carbonara

Music Editor

Brian Carmichael

Video Assist/Playback

Teresa Carriker-thayer

Art Director

Andrew Casey

Steadicam Operator

Francis Catalano

Grip

Korey J. Cauchon

Visual Effects Producer

Ted Cella

Production Assistant

Vicky Cervantes

Production Secretary

Victor Chan

Stunts

Maria K. Chavez

Production Supervisor

Temese Chavis

Accountant

Bob Chefalas

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Rick Chefalas

Assistant Sound Editor

Larry M. Cherry

Hair

Gary Chester

Music

Andrew Cheung

Grip

Kathleen Chopin

Casting

William R Claxton

Grip

Toni Colandreo

Song

Cheri Coleman

Production Assistant

Doug Coleman

Unit Director

Jeff Collette

Assistant

Bob Colletti

Stunts

Leslie Collins

Medic

Shakera Collins

Song

Chris Colombo

Stunts

George Colucci

Stunts

Richard Condon

Source Material

Marius Constant

Song

Marko Constanzo

Foley Artist

J. John Corbett

Titles

J. John Corbett

Main Title Design

Kathleen Corgan

Photography

Chris Cozens

Music

Larry W Crenshaw

Transportation Coordinator

Daisy Curbeon

Hair Stylist

Benjamin Curtis

Song

Brandon Curtis

Song

Dominic Daigle

Matte Painter

Peter Damien

Construction Coordinator

Avi Das

Cg Supervisor

Ray Davies

Song

Darrell Craig Davis

Stunts

Angel Deangelis Haiko

Hair Stylist

Paul Deason

Unit Production Manager

Eric Dehaven

Compositing Supervisor

Alley Deheza

Song

Claudia Deheza

Song

Joseph M Deluca

On-Set Dresser

Cecil B Demeals

Craft Service

Jonathan Demme

Producer

Peter Demme

Location Assistant

David Depalo

Original Music

Pascal Devoyan

Song Performer

Chris Dibble

Music

Cherrie Dietz

Production Assistant

Naomi Donne

Makeup Artist

Christopher Donohue

Rigging Grip

John K Donohue

Rigging Grip

Antoine L. Douaihy

Unit Director

Antoine L. Douaihy

Location Manager

Norman Douglass

Stunts

Lois Drabkin

Casting Assistant

Edward Drohan

Special Effects Technician

P Drucker

Song

Jerry Duplessis

Song

Andy Duppin

Stunts

Marjorie Durand

Makeup Artist

Kate Eales

Assistant Editor

Rochelle Edelson

Scenic Artist

Nicole Edwards

Assistant Location Manager

Jules Eggli

Assistant

Jeffrey A. Eplett

Rigging Electrician

Peter Epstein

Stunts

Alejandro Escovedo

Song Performer

Alejandro Escovedo

Song

Tim Everitt

Cgi Artist

Edward Fanning

Transportation Co-Captain

James Fanning

Transportation Captain

Gabriel Faure

Song

Carolyn Feldschuh

Stunts

Ryan Ferguson

Assistant Location Manager

Stanley Fernandez Jr.

Photography

Deak Ferrand

Matte Painter

Jim Ferris

Electrician

Amanda Finkelberg

Cgi Artist

Tom Fleischman

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Cliff Fleming

Stunt Coordinator

Cory Fleming

Stunts

Klaus Flouride

Song

Ray Flynn

Rigging Electrician

Sean Fogel

Production Supervisor

John Fogerty

Song

Erika Forster

Craft Service

Reba Frankel

Generator Operator

Abdul Franklin

Assistant Editor

Alex Fratar

Assistant

Donavan Freberg

Song Performer

Donavan Freberg

Song

Betsy Friedman

Assistant Director

Mark Frost

Other

Kate O Fujimoto

Assistant

Tak Fujimoto

Director Of Photography

Carl Fullerton

Makeup

Charles Furey

Craft Service

Tim Gallin

Stunts

Kirstin Gallo

Costumer

Josh Garza

Song

Heather Gauntt

Assistant Location Manager

Dean Georgaris

Screenplay

Gary Giffune

Stunts

Andy Gill

Song

Raphaella Giugliano

Auditor

Lewis Goldstein

Sound Effects Editor

Amy R Gorin

Assistant Location Manager

Patricia Grand

Hair Stylist

Christopher F Graneto

Grip

Ann Gray

Post-Production Coordinator

Dennis Green

Video Assist/Playback

Rhonney Greene

Production Assistant

Robert Griffon

Property Master

Joe C. Guest

Assistant Location Manager

Theresa Rose Gusmorino

Song Performer

Al Guthery

Stunts

Craig Haagensen

Camera Operator

Paul Halligan

Rigging Grip

Mitch Harbeson

Assistant Location Manager

Richard Harfst

Advisor

Gregg Harris

Boom Operator

James E Harris

Electrician

Jeff Hayman

Advisor

Angela Heald

Production Supervisor

J. Roy Helland

Makeup

Barbara Heller

Location Manager

Anthony Hemingway

Assistant Director

Darren Henley

Song

Brad Herman

Cgi Artist

Ilona Herzberg

Producer

Don J Hewitt

Stunts

Don Hewitt

Stunts

Film Details

Also Known As
Manchurian Candidate, Un crime dans la tête, crime dans la tête
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Thriller
Political
Adaptation
Release Date
2004
Production Company
Kira Smith
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures
Location
New Jersey, USA; New York, USA; New York, USA; Santa Monica, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 10m

Articles

The Manchurian Candidate 2004


I keep having this very strange recurring dream. At first it seems very pleasant as I sit with these elderly women at a quaint garden party, but suddenly it turns monstrous. Strips of classic films hang from trim bins all around me, and a man begins to mercilessly chop them to pieces with a guillotine blade. He has been ordered to do so by one of these genteel old ladies, and it is as if he has no control of his actions. Slicing and dicing at will with sprocket holes spewing everywhere. Why is he bent on destroying these films?

Based on message boards, websites, and Angela Lansbury quotes online, it seems people have been having this same dream. Remaking classic films for modern audiences feels like a nightmarish act. "I'm so unhappy," Lansbury said. "I'm so sorry they had to mess with something that was so perfect." Film buffs are irate. There is no reason to mess with perfection and try to improve upon the original film version of The Manchurian Candidate. Some cinephiles are asking for the heads of Jonathan Demme, Scott Rudin, and Tina Sinatra on a silver platter for committing such a blasphemous cinematic act.

Yet most of the reviews say that the new movie works on its own right and should not be compared to the original. It's more of a straightforward thriller, whereas the original was an intense psychological melodrama with elements of black comedy. Tina Sinatra released the rights to the film for a remake because she says, "(my father) believed, as we do, that premises can be brought into the future."

Jonathan Demme's take on The Manchurian Candidate really works on a new level by bringing the paranoid internal conflict of the Bennett Marco (Denzel Washington) character to the forefront and making it the foundation on which the entire film is built. Jonathan Demme creates a claustrophobic world where parental pressure, societal expectations of normalcy, media bombardment, corporate puppetmasters, and bad science impact the characters. Even people in the film who do not have brain implants inside them seem to show subtle signs of brainwashing. Take for instance the opening scene at the Boy Scout meeting where everyone says all the right things and asks all the right questions of Bennett Marco, a man who served his country in Desert Storm. Or look at the Democratic Convention and celebration party where revelers are frothing at the mouth like Pavlovian dogs willing to believe everything they see. It is all staged much like current TV -- an invasive presence that runs throughout the film. Even the visual style supports this internal paranoia with a dearth of tight close-ups and actors talking directly into the camera. Director of Photography Tak Fujimoto explains, "(Jonathan Demme) wanted to give audiences a visual connection between Melvin's room and Marco's mind. In that way, the cinematography is almost documentary-like, with the camera sort of poking around, probing to find something in the center of the frame that's not there."

On an emotional level, The Manchurian Candidate succeeds, but the film fails when it gets caught up in typical thriller trappings. All good thrillers have mad scientists, and there is no lack of them in this one. My personal favorite is the crazy monkey doctor, an Albanian refugee (played by German actor Bruno Ganz) that has some unexplained relationship to Bennett Marco, who knows everything about implanted chips in people and delivers shock therapy as needed. Unfortunately, the emotional tautness of the film goes slack when it focuses on plot rather than the characters' inner turmoil. All of this creates severe credibility problems when men being tracked by the FBI can walk into a political rally, be detected on camera, be followed the ENTIRE movie around every corner of New York City, and then be left alone to commit an assassination. The original version of Candidate works much better on this level, building to a much more disturbing climax.

To say that Jonathan Demme's 2004 version of The Manchurian Candidate lacks merit, however, would be unjust. It's just frustrating to see a potentially great and disturbing political satire sacrificing compelling character development in favor of convoluted plot twists.

Now I am starting to have more nightmares. These garden party attendees are discussing a remake of another classic thriller, North by Northwest. Wait, this is just a bad dream. Hollywood would never do something that horrifying.

by Tom Cappello
The Manchurian Candidate 2004

The Manchurian Candidate 2004

I keep having this very strange recurring dream. At first it seems very pleasant as I sit with these elderly women at a quaint garden party, but suddenly it turns monstrous. Strips of classic films hang from trim bins all around me, and a man begins to mercilessly chop them to pieces with a guillotine blade. He has been ordered to do so by one of these genteel old ladies, and it is as if he has no control of his actions. Slicing and dicing at will with sprocket holes spewing everywhere. Why is he bent on destroying these films? Based on message boards, websites, and Angela Lansbury quotes online, it seems people have been having this same dream. Remaking classic films for modern audiences feels like a nightmarish act. "I'm so unhappy," Lansbury said. "I'm so sorry they had to mess with something that was so perfect." Film buffs are irate. There is no reason to mess with perfection and try to improve upon the original film version of The Manchurian Candidate. Some cinephiles are asking for the heads of Jonathan Demme, Scott Rudin, and Tina Sinatra on a silver platter for committing such a blasphemous cinematic act. Yet most of the reviews say that the new movie works on its own right and should not be compared to the original. It's more of a straightforward thriller, whereas the original was an intense psychological melodrama with elements of black comedy. Tina Sinatra released the rights to the film for a remake because she says, "(my father) believed, as we do, that premises can be brought into the future." Jonathan Demme's take on The Manchurian Candidate really works on a new level by bringing the paranoid internal conflict of the Bennett Marco (Denzel Washington) character to the forefront and making it the foundation on which the entire film is built. Jonathan Demme creates a claustrophobic world where parental pressure, societal expectations of normalcy, media bombardment, corporate puppetmasters, and bad science impact the characters. Even people in the film who do not have brain implants inside them seem to show subtle signs of brainwashing. Take for instance the opening scene at the Boy Scout meeting where everyone says all the right things and asks all the right questions of Bennett Marco, a man who served his country in Desert Storm. Or look at the Democratic Convention and celebration party where revelers are frothing at the mouth like Pavlovian dogs willing to believe everything they see. It is all staged much like current TV -- an invasive presence that runs throughout the film. Even the visual style supports this internal paranoia with a dearth of tight close-ups and actors talking directly into the camera. Director of Photography Tak Fujimoto explains, "(Jonathan Demme) wanted to give audiences a visual connection between Melvin's room and Marco's mind. In that way, the cinematography is almost documentary-like, with the camera sort of poking around, probing to find something in the center of the frame that's not there." On an emotional level, The Manchurian Candidate succeeds, but the film fails when it gets caught up in typical thriller trappings. All good thrillers have mad scientists, and there is no lack of them in this one. My personal favorite is the crazy monkey doctor, an Albanian refugee (played by German actor Bruno Ganz) that has some unexplained relationship to Bennett Marco, who knows everything about implanted chips in people and delivers shock therapy as needed. Unfortunately, the emotional tautness of the film goes slack when it focuses on plot rather than the characters' inner turmoil. All of this creates severe credibility problems when men being tracked by the FBI can walk into a political rally, be detected on camera, be followed the ENTIRE movie around every corner of New York City, and then be left alone to commit an assassination. The original version of Candidate works much better on this level, building to a much more disturbing climax. To say that Jonathan Demme's 2004 version of The Manchurian Candidate lacks merit, however, would be unjust. It's just frustrating to see a potentially great and disturbing political satire sacrificing compelling character development in favor of convoluted plot twists. Now I am starting to have more nightmares. These garden party attendees are discussing a remake of another classic thriller, North by Northwest. Wait, this is just a bad dream. Hollywood would never do something that horrifying. by Tom Cappello

George Axelrod, 1922-2003


George Axelrod, a writer whose sharp, cunning satires of the '50's and 60's influenced the more wry, pop-culture sensibility of modern filmmakers, died June 21 of heart failure at his Los Angeles home. He was 81.

Born June 9, 1922, in New York City to the son of the silent film actress Betty Carpenter, he had an eventful childhood in New York where, despite little formal education, he became an avaricious reader who hung around Broadway theaters. During World War II he served in the Army Signal Corps, then returned to New York, where in the late 40's and early 50's he wrote for radio and television and published a critically praised novel, Beggar's Choice.

He scored big on Broadway in 1952 with The Seven Year Itch. The comedy, about a frustrated, middle-aged man who takes advantage of his family's absence over a sweltering New York summer to have an affair with a sexy neighbor, won a Tony Award for its star, Tom Ewell, and was considered daring for its time as it teased current sexual mores and conventions. The play was adapted into a movie in 1955 by Billy Wilder, as a vehicle for Marilyn Monroe, with Ewell reprising his role. Unfortunately, the censors and studio executives would not allow the hero to actually consummate the affair; instead, Ewell was seen merely daydreaming a few romantic scenes, a situation that left the playwright far from happy.

Nevertheless, the success of The Seven Year Itch, opened the door for Axelrod as a screenwriter. He did a fine adaptation of William Inge's play Bus Stop (1956) again starring Marilyn Monroe, and did a splendid job transferring Truman Capote's lovely Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961). Although his relationship with the director Blake Edwards was rancorous at best, it did earn Axelrod his only Academy Award nomination.

So frustrated with his work being so heavily revised by Hollywood, that Axelrod decided to move from New York to Los Angeles, where he could more closely monitor the treatment of his scripts. It was around this period that Axelrod developed some his best work since he began producing as well as writing: the incisive, scorchingly subversive cold war thriller The Manchurian Candidate (1962), based on Richard Condon's novel about an American POW (Laurence Harvey) who returns home and is brainwashed to kill a powerful politician; the urbane comedy Paris When it Sizzles (1964) that showed off its stars William Holden and Audrey Hepburn at their sophisticated best; his directorial debut with the remarkable (if somewhat undisciplined) satire Lord Love a Duck (1966) that skewers many sacred institutions of American culture (marriage, school, wealth, stardom) and has since become a cult favorite for midnight movie lovers; and finally (his only other directorial effort) a gentle comedy of wish fulfillment The Secret Life of an American Wife (1968) that gave Walter Matthau one of his most sympathetic roles.

By the '70s, Axelrod retired quietly in Los Angeles. He returned to write one fine screenplay, John Mackenzie's slick political thriller The Fourth Protocol (1987) starring Michael Caine. He is survived by his sons Peter, Steven, and Jonathan; a daughter Nina; seven grandchildren; and a sister, Connie Burdick.

by Michael T. Toole

George Axelrod, 1922-2003

George Axelrod, a writer whose sharp, cunning satires of the '50's and 60's influenced the more wry, pop-culture sensibility of modern filmmakers, died June 21 of heart failure at his Los Angeles home. He was 81. Born June 9, 1922, in New York City to the son of the silent film actress Betty Carpenter, he had an eventful childhood in New York where, despite little formal education, he became an avaricious reader who hung around Broadway theaters. During World War II he served in the Army Signal Corps, then returned to New York, where in the late 40's and early 50's he wrote for radio and television and published a critically praised novel, Beggar's Choice. He scored big on Broadway in 1952 with The Seven Year Itch. The comedy, about a frustrated, middle-aged man who takes advantage of his family's absence over a sweltering New York summer to have an affair with a sexy neighbor, won a Tony Award for its star, Tom Ewell, and was considered daring for its time as it teased current sexual mores and conventions. The play was adapted into a movie in 1955 by Billy Wilder, as a vehicle for Marilyn Monroe, with Ewell reprising his role. Unfortunately, the censors and studio executives would not allow the hero to actually consummate the affair; instead, Ewell was seen merely daydreaming a few romantic scenes, a situation that left the playwright far from happy. Nevertheless, the success of The Seven Year Itch, opened the door for Axelrod as a screenwriter. He did a fine adaptation of William Inge's play Bus Stop (1956) again starring Marilyn Monroe, and did a splendid job transferring Truman Capote's lovely Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961). Although his relationship with the director Blake Edwards was rancorous at best, it did earn Axelrod his only Academy Award nomination. So frustrated with his work being so heavily revised by Hollywood, that Axelrod decided to move from New York to Los Angeles, where he could more closely monitor the treatment of his scripts. It was around this period that Axelrod developed some his best work since he began producing as well as writing: the incisive, scorchingly subversive cold war thriller The Manchurian Candidate (1962), based on Richard Condon's novel about an American POW (Laurence Harvey) who returns home and is brainwashed to kill a powerful politician; the urbane comedy Paris When it Sizzles (1964) that showed off its stars William Holden and Audrey Hepburn at their sophisticated best; his directorial debut with the remarkable (if somewhat undisciplined) satire Lord Love a Duck (1966) that skewers many sacred institutions of American culture (marriage, school, wealth, stardom) and has since become a cult favorite for midnight movie lovers; and finally (his only other directorial effort) a gentle comedy of wish fulfillment The Secret Life of an American Wife (1968) that gave Walter Matthau one of his most sympathetic roles. By the '70s, Axelrod retired quietly in Los Angeles. He returned to write one fine screenplay, John Mackenzie's slick political thriller The Fourth Protocol (1987) starring Michael Caine. He is survived by his sons Peter, Steven, and Jonathan; a daughter Nina; seven grandchildren; and a sister, Connie Burdick. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video December 21, 2004

Released in United States September 2004

Shown at Venice International Film Festival September 1-11, 2004.

Remake of "The Manchurian Candidate" (USA/1962), directed by John Frankenheimer.

Julianne Moore previously attached.

Project was previously in development at Warner Bros.

Author Richard Condon died April 9, 1996.

Julianne Moore and Glenn Close had both expressed interest in the project.

Released in United States Summer July 30, 2004

Released in United States on Video December 21, 2004

Released in United States September 2004 (Shown at Venice International Film Festival September 1-11, 2004.)

Released in United States Summer July 30, 2004