The Hurricane


2h 5m 1999

Brief Synopsis

Story about 1960s world middleweight boxing champion Rubin "Hurricane" Carter--a man whose dreams of winning the middleweight boxing title were destroyed when he was arrested along with another man for the murders of three white men in a New Jersey bar. Wrongfully accused, Carter and John Artis wer

Film Details

Also Known As
Huracán Carter, Hurricane
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1999
Production Company
Christie Mattull
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures
Location
Toronto, Ontario, Canada; New York City, New York, USA; Paterson, New Jersey, USA; Rahway State Prison, Rahway, New Jersey, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 5m

Synopsis

Story about 1960s world middleweight boxing champion Rubin "Hurricane" Carter--a man whose dreams of winning the middleweight boxing title were destroyed when he was arrested along with another man for the murders of three white men in a New Jersey bar. Wrongfully accused, Carter and John Artis were convicted and sentenced to three life terms in prison, where Carter decided to channel his frustration and despair by writing his own story from his cell. Although his autobigraphy, "The Sixteenth Round," did get published, Carter remained behind bars, finding inner peace by withdrawing from the outer world and the national interest which surrounded his case (including impassioned pleas from Bob Dylan and Muhammed Ali and others). Years later, an alienated American youth living in Canada, Vicellous Shannon, found direction and purpose for the first time in his life after reading Carter's book, and began corresponding with him... this eventually lead to a full-time campaign to get Carter released.

Crew

Marc Abraham

Executive Producer

Keith Adams

Grip

Brad Alexander

Assistant Location Manager

Quita Alfred

Wardrobe Supervisor

Scotty Allan

Lighting Technician

Clark Anderson

Song

Summer Anderson

Song

Janine Anderton

Production Coordinator

Allan Angus

Other

Pete Anthony

Music Conductor

Pete Anthony

Music

Samantha Armstrong

Script Supervisor

Jeff Authors

Assistant Director

Henry Avelin

Transportation Captain

Irving Azoff

Executive Producer

Matthew Baer

Special Thanks To

Clare Bambrough

Assistant Editor

Ken Barbet

Driver

Mark Barclay

Assistant

Bill Barvin

Assistant Location Manager

David R Beecroft

Hair Stylist

Myron Beldock

Special Thanks To

Robert Bell

Song

Ronald Bell

Song

Wilfred C Bell

Other

William Bellamy

Other

Angela Bellisio

Assistant

Brook Benton

Song

Paul F Bernard

Assistant Director

Armyan Bernstein

Producer

Armyan Bernstein

Screenplay

Riccardo Bertoni

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Yasiin Bey

Song Performer

Yasiin Bey

Song

Deryck Blake

Assistant Property Master

Thomas Bliss

Executive Producer

Beth Bowling

Casting Associate

Jeremy Boxen

Production Assistant

Kelly Brine

Storyboard Artist

Elizabeth Broden

Assistant

Darrin Brown

Assistant Art Director

Falana Brown

Song

Flo Brown

Song Performer

George Brown

Song

Ruth Brown

Song Performer

Tim Bryant

Grip

Pete Bucossi

Stunt Coordinator

Kenneth Burgomaster

Other

J Burke

Song

Gary Burritt

Negative Cutting

Nathan J. Busch

Hair Stylist

John Caglione Jr.

Makeup Artist

Anita Camarata

Executive Consultant

Paul Candrilli

Best Boy Grip

Ross Carter

Assistant Sound Editor

Rubin Carter

Book As Source Material

Bruce Carwardine

Sound Mixer

Sam Chaiton

Book As Source Material

Ray Charles

Song Performer

Ray Charles

Song

Alvin Chea

Song Performer

Larry M. Cherry

Hair Stylist

Ellen Christiansen

Set Decorator

Konstantinos Christides

Other

Terry Claybon

Consultant

Todd Cochran

Other

Angelo Colavecchia

Camera Operator

Christopher Comrie

Accountant

Robin D. Cook

Casting

Donna Cowen

Production Assistant

Thomas Crehanm

Transportation Co-Captain

Carol Cuddy

Unit Production Manager

Dana L Cuff

Post-Production Coordinator

Dennis Davenport

Art Director

Billy Davis

Song

William Davis

Driver

Mac Day

Other

Sandy De Crescent

Music Contractor

Roger Deakins

Director Of Photography

Richard Devinki

Production Coordinator

Cesare Digiulio

Best Boy

Karola Dirnberger

Hair Assistant

Lamont Dozier

Song

Eumir Dsadata

Song

Donna Dupere-taylor

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Bob Dylan

Song

Bob Dylan

Song Performer

Greg Eby

Accounting Assistant

Suzann Ellis

Coproducer

David Evans

On-Set Dresser

Richard Fellegara

Medic

Robert Fernandez

Music

A B Fischer

Assistant

Dawn Fisher

Art Assistant

David Flaherty

Location Manager

Richard Ford

Lighting Technician

Lynn Foster

Production Assistant

Candide Franklyn

Camera Operator

Ross Fraser

Construction Coordinator

Professor Leon Friedman

Special Thanks To

Carl Fullerton

Makeup

Bulee Gaillard

Song

Bulee Gaillard

Song Performer

Sue Gandy

Assistant Costume Designer

Darcy Gasparovic

Assistant Camera Operator

Roland Gauvin

Key Rigging Grip

Marvin Gaye

Song Performer

Nick Gazda

Assistant Art Director

Chris Geggie

Property Master

Jeanne L Gilliland

Boom Operator

Adam Gilmore

Assistant Camera Operator

Jim Gilstrap

Song Performer

Mark Gingras

Sound Effects Editor

Lane Glisson

Graphics

Barry Goodwin

Other

Dan Gordon

Screenplay

Graeme Gossage

Props Buyer

Wayne Griffin

Sound Editor

Duane Gullison

Lighting

Misty Green Haaksman

Assistant

Thomas E Halligan

Key Grip

Terry Ham

Assistant Director

Bruce Hamme

Dolly Grip

Andy Harris

Assistant Camera Operator

Mathew Hart

Unit Production Manager

Dianne Hatlestad

Assistant

Ann Henshaw

Costumes

Gina Heyman

Assistant Location Manager

John J Hill

Special Thanks To

Tanya Noel Hill

Music Editor

Paul Hogan

Dga Trainee

Brian Holland

Song

Edward Holland

Song

Danny Holloway

Music

George Hugel

Construction Coordinator

Larry Huston

Camera Operator

Mike Hyde

Carpenter

Rodney Jackson

Assistant

Robert C Janiszewski

Special Thanks To

Jon Jashni

Coproducer

Karl Jenkins

Song

Michael Jewison

Coproducer

Norman Jewison

Producer

Arabella Johannes

Assistant

Etta Jones

Song Performer

Michael K Jones

Driver

Mark Kamine

Location Manager

Joann Kane

Music

Barbara Kastner

Property Master

Avy Kaufman

Casting

Irene Kent

Makeup Artist

John Ketcham

Producer

Kaz Kobielski

Special Effects Coordinator

Alex Kontsalakis

Accounting Assistant

Andy Koyama

Rerecording

Goro Koyama

Foley Artist

George Kraychyk

Photography

Jon Kull

Music

Peter Kunz

Special Effects Coordinator

Kathy Lacommare

Assistant Editor

John Laing

Dialogue Editor

Rudy Langlais

Executive Producer

Marcel Laporte

Carpenter

Jonathan Leigh

Lighting

Jacques Levy

Song

Julie Lichter

Casting Associate

Sophia Lofters

Assistant Production Coordinator

Eric Lunsford

Security

James Maccammon

Other

Andy Malcolm

Foley Artist

Mark Manchester

Key Grip

Jim Manzione

Lighting Technician

Charlie Marroquin

Key Grip

Mercedes Martinez

Song

Christie Mattull

Production Insurance

Rob Mceune

Scenic Artist

Clyde Mcphatter

Song Performer

Peter Melnychuk

Boom Operator

Mohlan Merrick

Song

Robert Mickens

Song

Thomas Milano

Music Editor

Mike Milliken

Color Timer

Paul Mills

Song

Raynard Miner

Song

Stuart Mitchell

Transportation Captain

Hugh Montgomerie

Other

Tracey Moore

Song

Kimberlee Morley

Other

Barbara Morrison

Song Performer

Sunjin Nam

Other

Malcolm Nefsky

Best Boy Grip

Otto Nemenz

Camera

Beth Nobes

Other

Tim O'connell

Rerecording

Michael O'farrell

Sound Editor

Norm O'halloran

Other

Tony Oliver

Camera Trainee

Christopher S. Parker

Music

Derek Parkes

Grip

Russ Pflueger

Other

Film Details

Also Known As
Huracán Carter, Hurricane
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1999
Production Company
Christie Mattull
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures
Location
Toronto, Ontario, Canada; New York City, New York, USA; Paterson, New Jersey, USA; Rahway State Prison, Rahway, New Jersey, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 5m

Award Nominations

Best Actor

1999
Denzel Washington

Articles

The Hurricane -


Before there were big-budget blockbusters loaded with costly and elaborate special effects, there were filmmakers and technicians who knew how to do a lot with a little. John Ford's 1937 drama, romance, and disaster epic The Hurricane sure packs a lot into one movie, and its special effects are, for the era in which it was made, surprisingly effective. This was a movie that, at least at the beginning, Ford very much wanted to direct: He had read and loved the novel on which it's based, by Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall (also the authors of Mutiny on the Bounty). According to Scott Eyman's 1999 Ford biography Print the Legend, Ford sent a message to producer Samuel Goldwyn from Honolulu, lobbying for the honor of adapting the book: "AM MORE THAN EVER CONVINCED I SHOULD WORK WITH YOU ON IT STOP WISH YOU COULD CONVINCE DARRYL [ZANUCK]...REGARDLESS WHO MAKES PICTURE POSITIVE IT WILL BE SUPERB AND REBOUND TO YOUR GLORY."

But this wasn't just a simple act of an already established director asking a powerful producer for a job. Ford and the notoriously controlling Goldwyn had worked together before, and clashed mightily, during the filming of Arrowsmith (1931); during filming, the hard-drinking Ford would become so angered by Goldwyn's unwanted interventions that he would sometimes go AWOL for days at a time. But Goldwyn, somewhat surprisingly, hired Ford for The Hurricane, offering him a salary of $100,000 and 12 percent of the film's net profits. He also told Ford he could shoot on location in the South Seas, and chartered Ford's own beloved yacht, the Araner, for use in the picture.

But if there's ever any such thing as smooth sailing in the movie business, there certainly wasn't much of it in the making of The Hurricane. The picture tells the story of Terangi, a young man from a Polynesian island (played by a newcomer named Jon Hall, the nephew of one of the novel's co-authors), who is imprisoned unjustly by white colonialists and tries desperately, and repeatedly, to escape in order to return to his home and his young wife, Marama (Dorothy Lamour, in full sarong regalia). With each attempted escape, his term is lengthened by years, and his treatment at the hands of a sadistic prison warden (John Carradine) only increases his misery. In the end, a tropical storm sweeps in, nature's way of avenging the cruelty of mankind and wiping the slate clean.

The strong cast of established actors in the film included Raymond Massey, Thomas Mitchell, and Mary Astor, the last of whom spoke highly of her exacting and often-temperamental director: She called him "terse, pithy and to the point." Also, she noted, he was "very Irish, a dark personality, a sensitivity which he did everything to conceal."

In fact, working with actors didn't seem to be a problem on The Hurricane. It was Goldwyn's reversal of a major promise he had made to Ford that changed the nature of the project. Goldwyn had told Ford he would be able to shoot on location, but then changed his mind -- the producer was notoriously averse to location shooting because it meant ceding too much control. "For atmosphere, the director had to make do with a few second-unit location shots taken in Samoa, some seafaring scenes he filmed about the Araner off Catalina Island, and wind machines blowing sand and water on the Goldwyn back lot in Hollywood," writes Joseph McBride in his 2001 book Searching for John Ford. Goldwyn also, according to McBride, brought in Ben Hecht to rewrite the movie in 72 hours; Hecht claims that Ford took the new dialogue scenes that Hecht had so hastily written and "shot them without reading them," suggesting the director's apparent indifference to the picture by that point.

Still, perhaps miraculously, Ford and Goldwyn had only one major clash on the set of The Hurricane. That didn't mean there weren't minor irritations. According to Eyman, Goldwyn would come to the set and complain: At one point, he told Lamour that her hair had the look of a cheap wig, a remark that upset the actress. (Ford defended her.) The bigger blowup came later, when Goldwyn showed up on set with Ira Gershwin in tow. Ford was working on a crane and had himself lowered upon seeing his boss, only to have Goldwyn complain to him that there weren't enough close-ups in the picture, particularly of Lamour. The argument devolved into something close to a shoving match, with Ford eventually showing Goldwyn the door. As Eyman reports, Goldwyn turned to Gershwin and said, "Well, at least I put the idea in his head." And in the end, The Hurricane did include a perfectly satisfying number of close-ups, both of Lamour and of the other principals.

There is still no doubt, though, that the glorious, and genuinely unnerving, tropical storm that caps the picture is its greatest achievement. The wind whistles and screams, whipping up fantastic waves of water that seem truly menacing; terrified citizens cling to trees for safety, often in futility. Ford shot the sequence with second-unit director James Basevi, who was responsible for staging it. There are plenty of strong moments in the film, but the storm-tossed climax is the place where Ford was able to fully exercise his gifts for drama, spectacle, and grandeur. While critics weren't particularly kind to the film, audiences flocked to it, and it made big money for both Goldwyn and Ford. With its half naturalistic, half expressionistic visual effects, it also laid a great deal of groundwork for disaster films to come. You could call it an imperfect perfect storm.

By Stephanie Zacharek

SOURCES:

IMDb
Scott Eyman, Print the Legend: The Life and Times of John Ford, Simon & Schuster, 1999
Dan Ford, Pappy: The Life of John Ford, Prentice-Hall, 1979
Joseph McBride, Searching for John Ford, St. Martin's Press, 2001

Producer: Samuel Goldwyn
Director: John Ford
Screenplay: Dudley Nichols (adaptation), Oliver H.P. Garrett (adaptation), Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall (novel), Ben Hecht (uncredited)
Cinematography: Bert Glennon
Music: Alfred Newman (uncredited)
Film Editing: Lloyd Nosler
Cast: Dorothy Lamour (Marama), Jon Hall (Terangi), Mary Astor (Madame DeLaage), C. Aubrey Smith (Father Paul), Thomas Mitchell (Dr. Kersaint), Raymond Massey (DeLaage)
[black and white, 110 minutes]
The Hurricane -

The Hurricane -

Before there were big-budget blockbusters loaded with costly and elaborate special effects, there were filmmakers and technicians who knew how to do a lot with a little. John Ford's 1937 drama, romance, and disaster epic The Hurricane sure packs a lot into one movie, and its special effects are, for the era in which it was made, surprisingly effective. This was a movie that, at least at the beginning, Ford very much wanted to direct: He had read and loved the novel on which it's based, by Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall (also the authors of Mutiny on the Bounty). According to Scott Eyman's 1999 Ford biography Print the Legend, Ford sent a message to producer Samuel Goldwyn from Honolulu, lobbying for the honor of adapting the book: "AM MORE THAN EVER CONVINCED I SHOULD WORK WITH YOU ON IT STOP WISH YOU COULD CONVINCE DARRYL [ZANUCK]...REGARDLESS WHO MAKES PICTURE POSITIVE IT WILL BE SUPERB AND REBOUND TO YOUR GLORY." But this wasn't just a simple act of an already established director asking a powerful producer for a job. Ford and the notoriously controlling Goldwyn had worked together before, and clashed mightily, during the filming of Arrowsmith (1931); during filming, the hard-drinking Ford would become so angered by Goldwyn's unwanted interventions that he would sometimes go AWOL for days at a time. But Goldwyn, somewhat surprisingly, hired Ford for The Hurricane, offering him a salary of $100,000 and 12 percent of the film's net profits. He also told Ford he could shoot on location in the South Seas, and chartered Ford's own beloved yacht, the Araner, for use in the picture. But if there's ever any such thing as smooth sailing in the movie business, there certainly wasn't much of it in the making of The Hurricane. The picture tells the story of Terangi, a young man from a Polynesian island (played by a newcomer named Jon Hall, the nephew of one of the novel's co-authors), who is imprisoned unjustly by white colonialists and tries desperately, and repeatedly, to escape in order to return to his home and his young wife, Marama (Dorothy Lamour, in full sarong regalia). With each attempted escape, his term is lengthened by years, and his treatment at the hands of a sadistic prison warden (John Carradine) only increases his misery. In the end, a tropical storm sweeps in, nature's way of avenging the cruelty of mankind and wiping the slate clean. The strong cast of established actors in the film included Raymond Massey, Thomas Mitchell, and Mary Astor, the last of whom spoke highly of her exacting and often-temperamental director: She called him "terse, pithy and to the point." Also, she noted, he was "very Irish, a dark personality, a sensitivity which he did everything to conceal." In fact, working with actors didn't seem to be a problem on The Hurricane. It was Goldwyn's reversal of a major promise he had made to Ford that changed the nature of the project. Goldwyn had told Ford he would be able to shoot on location, but then changed his mind -- the producer was notoriously averse to location shooting because it meant ceding too much control. "For atmosphere, the director had to make do with a few second-unit location shots taken in Samoa, some seafaring scenes he filmed about the Araner off Catalina Island, and wind machines blowing sand and water on the Goldwyn back lot in Hollywood," writes Joseph McBride in his 2001 book Searching for John Ford. Goldwyn also, according to McBride, brought in Ben Hecht to rewrite the movie in 72 hours; Hecht claims that Ford took the new dialogue scenes that Hecht had so hastily written and "shot them without reading them," suggesting the director's apparent indifference to the picture by that point. Still, perhaps miraculously, Ford and Goldwyn had only one major clash on the set of The Hurricane. That didn't mean there weren't minor irritations. According to Eyman, Goldwyn would come to the set and complain: At one point, he told Lamour that her hair had the look of a cheap wig, a remark that upset the actress. (Ford defended her.) The bigger blowup came later, when Goldwyn showed up on set with Ira Gershwin in tow. Ford was working on a crane and had himself lowered upon seeing his boss, only to have Goldwyn complain to him that there weren't enough close-ups in the picture, particularly of Lamour. The argument devolved into something close to a shoving match, with Ford eventually showing Goldwyn the door. As Eyman reports, Goldwyn turned to Gershwin and said, "Well, at least I put the idea in his head." And in the end, The Hurricane did include a perfectly satisfying number of close-ups, both of Lamour and of the other principals. There is still no doubt, though, that the glorious, and genuinely unnerving, tropical storm that caps the picture is its greatest achievement. The wind whistles and screams, whipping up fantastic waves of water that seem truly menacing; terrified citizens cling to trees for safety, often in futility. Ford shot the sequence with second-unit director James Basevi, who was responsible for staging it. There are plenty of strong moments in the film, but the storm-tossed climax is the place where Ford was able to fully exercise his gifts for drama, spectacle, and grandeur. While critics weren't particularly kind to the film, audiences flocked to it, and it made big money for both Goldwyn and Ford. With its half naturalistic, half expressionistic visual effects, it also laid a great deal of groundwork for disaster films to come. You could call it an imperfect perfect storm. By Stephanie Zacharek SOURCES: IMDb Scott Eyman, Print the Legend: The Life and Times of John Ford, Simon & Schuster, 1999 Dan Ford, Pappy: The Life of John Ford, Prentice-Hall, 1979 Joseph McBride, Searching for John Ford, St. Martin's Press, 2001 Producer: Samuel Goldwyn Director: John Ford Screenplay: Dudley Nichols (adaptation), Oliver H.P. Garrett (adaptation), Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall (novel), Ben Hecht (uncredited) Cinematography: Bert Glennon Music: Alfred Newman (uncredited) Film Editing: Lloyd Nosler Cast: Dorothy Lamour (Marama), Jon Hall (Terangi), Mary Astor (Madame DeLaage), C. Aubrey Smith (Father Paul), Thomas Mitchell (Dr. Kersaint), Raymond Massey (DeLaage) [black and white, 110 minutes]

TCM Remembers - Rod Steiger


ROD STEIGER, 1925 - 2002

From the docks of New York to the rural back roads of Mississippi to the war torn Russian steppes, Rod Steiger reveled in creating some of the most overpowering and difficult men on the screen. He could be a total scoundrel, embodying Machiavelli's idiom that "it's better to be feared than loved" in the movies. But as an actor he refused to be typecast and his wide range included characters who were secretly tormented (The Pawnbroker, 1965) or loners (Run of the Arrow, 1965) or eccentrics (The Loved One, 1965).

Along with Marlon Brando, Steiger helped bring the 'Method School' from the Group Theater and Actors Studio in New York to the screens of Hollywood. The Method technique, taught by Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, insisted on complete immersion into the character's psyche and resulted in intense, dramatic performances and performers. Steiger made his first significant screen appearance as Brando's older brother in On the Waterfront (1954). Their climatic scene together in a taxicab is one of the great moments in American cinema.

It was a short leap from playing a crooked lawyer in On the Waterfront to playing the shady boxing promoter in The Harder They Fall (1956). Based on the tragic tale of true-life fighter Primo Carnera, The Harder They Fall details the corruption behind the scenes of professional boxing bouts. Steiger is a fight manager named Nick Benko who enlists newspaperman Eddie Willis (Humphrey Bogart in his final screen appearance) to drum up publicity for a fixed prizefight. While the boxing scenes were often brutally realistic, the most powerful dramatic moments took place between Steiger and Bogart on the sidelines.

As mob boss Al Capone (1959), Steiger got to play another man you loved to hate. He vividly depicted the criminal from his swaggering early days to his pathetic demise from syphilis. In Doctor Zhivago (1965), Steiger was the only American in the international cast, playing the hateful and perverse Komarovsky. During the production of Dr. Zhivago, Steiger often found himself at odds with director David Lean. Schooled in the British tradition, Lean valued the integrity of the script and demanded that actors remain faithful to the script. Steiger, on the other hand, relied on improvisation and spontaneity. When kissing the lovely Lara (played by Julie Christie), Steiger jammed his tongue into Christie's mouth to produce the desired reaction - disgust. It worked! While it might not have been Lean's approach, it brought a grittier edge to the prestige production and made Komarovsky is a detestable but truly memorable figure.

Steiger dared audiences to dislike him. As the smalltown southern Sheriff Gillespie in In The Heat of the Night (1967), Steiger embodied all the prejudices and suspicions of a racist. When a black northern lawyer, played by Sidney Poitier, arrives on the crime scene, Gillespie is forced to recognize his fellow man as an equal despite skin color. Here, Steiger's character started as a bigot and developed into a better man. He finally claimed a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Sheriff Gillespie.

Steiger was an actor's actor. A chameleon who didn't think twice about diving into challenging roles that others would shy away from. In the Private Screenings interview he did with host Robert Osborne he admitted that Paul Muni was one of his idols because of his total immersion into his roles. Steiger said, "I believe actors are supposed to create different human beings." And Steiger showed us a rich and diverse cross section of them.

by Jeremy Geltzer & Jeff Stafford

TCM Remembers - Rod Steiger

ROD STEIGER, 1925 - 2002 From the docks of New York to the rural back roads of Mississippi to the war torn Russian steppes, Rod Steiger reveled in creating some of the most overpowering and difficult men on the screen. He could be a total scoundrel, embodying Machiavelli's idiom that "it's better to be feared than loved" in the movies. But as an actor he refused to be typecast and his wide range included characters who were secretly tormented (The Pawnbroker, 1965) or loners (Run of the Arrow, 1965) or eccentrics (The Loved One, 1965). Along with Marlon Brando, Steiger helped bring the 'Method School' from the Group Theater and Actors Studio in New York to the screens of Hollywood. The Method technique, taught by Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, insisted on complete immersion into the character's psyche and resulted in intense, dramatic performances and performers. Steiger made his first significant screen appearance as Brando's older brother in On the Waterfront (1954). Their climatic scene together in a taxicab is one of the great moments in American cinema. It was a short leap from playing a crooked lawyer in On the Waterfront to playing the shady boxing promoter in The Harder They Fall (1956). Based on the tragic tale of true-life fighter Primo Carnera, The Harder They Fall details the corruption behind the scenes of professional boxing bouts. Steiger is a fight manager named Nick Benko who enlists newspaperman Eddie Willis (Humphrey Bogart in his final screen appearance) to drum up publicity for a fixed prizefight. While the boxing scenes were often brutally realistic, the most powerful dramatic moments took place between Steiger and Bogart on the sidelines. As mob boss Al Capone (1959), Steiger got to play another man you loved to hate. He vividly depicted the criminal from his swaggering early days to his pathetic demise from syphilis. In Doctor Zhivago (1965), Steiger was the only American in the international cast, playing the hateful and perverse Komarovsky. During the production of Dr. Zhivago, Steiger often found himself at odds with director David Lean. Schooled in the British tradition, Lean valued the integrity of the script and demanded that actors remain faithful to the script. Steiger, on the other hand, relied on improvisation and spontaneity. When kissing the lovely Lara (played by Julie Christie), Steiger jammed his tongue into Christie's mouth to produce the desired reaction - disgust. It worked! While it might not have been Lean's approach, it brought a grittier edge to the prestige production and made Komarovsky is a detestable but truly memorable figure. Steiger dared audiences to dislike him. As the smalltown southern Sheriff Gillespie in In The Heat of the Night (1967), Steiger embodied all the prejudices and suspicions of a racist. When a black northern lawyer, played by Sidney Poitier, arrives on the crime scene, Gillespie is forced to recognize his fellow man as an equal despite skin color. Here, Steiger's character started as a bigot and developed into a better man. He finally claimed a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Sheriff Gillespie. Steiger was an actor's actor. A chameleon who didn't think twice about diving into challenging roles that others would shy away from. In the Private Screenings interview he did with host Robert Osborne he admitted that Paul Muni was one of his idols because of his total immersion into his roles. Steiger said, "I believe actors are supposed to create different human beings." And Steiger showed us a rich and diverse cross section of them. by Jeremy Geltzer & Jeff Stafford

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Winner of the Silver Berlin Bear for Best Actor (Denzel Washington) at the 2000 Berlin International Film Festival.

Winner of the 1999 NAACP Image Award for Best Actor (Denzel Washington).

Winner of the 1999 Scripter Award for Best Film Adaptation of a Book from the Friends of the University of Southern California (USC) Libraries.

Limited Release in United States December 29, 1999

Released in United States Winter December 29, 1999

Expanded Release in United States January 7, 2000

Expanded Release in United States January 14, 2000

Wide Release in United States January 21, 2000

Released in United States on Video July 11, 2000

Released in United States February 2000

Shown at Berlin International Film Festival (in competition) February 9-20, 2000.

Completed shooting February 20, 1999.

Began shooting November 10, 1998.

Limited Release in United States December 29, 1999

Released in United States Winter December 29, 1999

Expanded Release in United States January 7, 2000

Expanded Release in United States January 14, 2000

Wide Release in United States January 21, 2000

Released in United States on Video July 11, 2000

Released in United States February 2000 (Shown at Berlin International Film Festival (in competition) February 9-20, 2000.)