Waiting For the Light


1h 30m 1990

Brief Synopsis

A mother, her two children and aunt move to a small midwestern town in 1962 to run a diner. The aunt, a former spiritualist in a carnival, comes to the boys' aid by concocting an illusion to scare their neighbor, the meanest man in town.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1990
Production Company
Cinema Research Corporation; Clein & White Public Relations; Pressman Film
Distribution Company
SONY PICTURES RELEASING INTERNATIONAL/TRIUMPH RELEASING; Entertainment Film Distributors, Ltd.; Hoyts Distribution; Sony Pictures Home Entertainment; Sony Pictures Releasing International; Sony Pictures Releasing International; Tohokushinsha Film Corporation; Triumph Releasing
Location
Tacoma, Washington, USA; Seattle, Washington, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Synopsis

A mother, her two children and aunt move to a small midwestern town in 1962 to run a diner. The aunt, a former spiritualist in a carnival, comes to the boys' aid by concocting an illusion to scare their neighbor, the meanest man in town.

Crew

Peter W Allen

Art Department Coordinator

Peter W Allen

Location Liaison

Sherry Anders

Makeup Assistant

Sherry Anders

Hairstyles Assistant

Gregory W Anderson

Driver (Wardrobe)

Brad Arensman

Post-Production Executive

Enid Arias

Hairstyles

Charles Armstrong

Set Dresser

Tassilo Baur

Special Effects Coordinator

Bud Beadle

Saxophonist; Woodwind Player

Ken Berg

Construction Foreman

Gabriel Beristain

Director Of Photography

Ron Bloomer

Video Researcher

Virginia Bogert

Production Coordinator

Ron Bozman

Producer

Jennifer Campbell

Assistant

Jenny Campbell

Assistant (To Christopher Monger)

Nancy Campbell

Casting (Extras)

Budd Carr

Music Supervisor

Steven I Celniker

Post-Production Supervisor

Karen Chalk

Production Accountant Assistant

Bob Chestnut

Makeup Trailer

Bob Chestnut

Transportation Captain

Todd Christensen

Production Assistant (Seattle)

Cotty Chubb

Producer

Matthew J Clark

1st Assistant Director

Harry Cohen

Sound Effects Designer

Ray Collins

Song ("Memories Of El Monte")

Dorree Cooper

Art Direction

Loren Corney

Construction Coordinator

Richard Daley

Stunts

W Russell Davis

Driver (Shirley Maclaine)

Susan Dixon

Casting (Seattle)

Lee Dorsey

Song Performer ("Working In A Coal Mine")

Jimmy Duncan

Song ("My Special Angel")

Terence Eagan

Other

Brad Einhorn

Property Master

Steven Eyrse

Other

Terri Fiyalko

Sound Editor

Louis Flores

Caterer Assistant

Michael Flynn

Associate Producer

Chuck Frayne

Technical Consultant (Magician)

Louis G. Friedman

Production Executive

Lori Gabriel

Craft Service

Alfred Gaitwood

Song ("Guided Missiles")

Juliana Gardner

Other

Eva Gardos

Editor

Harvey Garvin

2nd Assistant Camera

Alan Gershenfeld

Production Coordinator (Los Angeles)

Dan Gillham

Gaffer

Gerry Goffin

Song ("Loco-Motion")

Jane Goldsmith

Script Supervisor

Laura Goldsmith

Key Costumer

Lewis Goldstein

Music Editor

Mark Goodermote

Boom Operator

Anne Gordon

Animal Handler

Christopher Grant

Caterer

Shari Griffin

Set Costumer

Patrick M Griffith

Post-Production Sound Supervisor

Bruce Hamme

Dolly Grip

Elizabeth Hancock

Apprentice Editor

Suzanne Hanover

Stills

Jay R. Hart

Set Dresser Assistant

Bobby Helms

Song Performer ("My Special Angel")

Neil Hyman

Other

Diana Johnson

Production Accountant

Avram Kaplan

Production Controller

Fred Kimball

Carpenter

Carole King

Song ("Loco-Motion")

William A Klinger

Special Effects Coordinator

Linda Koulisis

Associate Producer

Kerri Kroll

Other

Gary Lambers

Other

A. Welch Lambeth

Transportation Coordinator

Walter Lambeth

Driver (Teri Garr)

Coni Lancaster

2nd Assistant Director

Kim Larsen

Production Assistant

Gerry Lentz

Adr Recording

Mike Leon

Location Manager

Lachlin Loud

Set Designer

David Lust

Unit Publicist

Robena Malicoat

Grip

Joe Mayer

Sound Editor

Michael J Mccombe

Other

Lee V Mccullum

Song ("Jesus Hits Like An Atom Bomb")

Jan Mcgill

Casting Assistant

Lori Melendy

Graphics Designer

Milo Mell

Location Scout

Monica Melvin

Production Coordinator

Monica Melvin

Unit Production Manager Assistant

Christopher Monger

Screenwriter

Ed Novick

Sound Mixer

Ed Novick

Sound Recording

Peter Nunnery

Production Assistant (Los Angeles)

Terry O'bright

Foley Recording

Rafael Orozco

Key Production Assistant

Phil Peters

Production Designer

Ken S Polk

Sound Rerecording

Edward Pressman

Executive Producer

Pamela Rack Guest

Casting

Tony M Ramano

Stunts

Brian H Reynolds

Key Grip

David Riley

1st Assistant Camera

Laurin Rinder

Assistant Editor

Catherine Rowe

Foley Artist

Joan Rowe

Foley Artist

Judy Ruskin Howell

Additional Costumer

David Saltzman

Swing Gang

Elisa Sansalone

2nd Assistant Director

Gerald Sebesky

Song ("Festive March")

Michael Seifert

Driver

Thomas Sharkey

Assistant (To Shirley Maclaine)

Don Simandl

Bestboy Grip

Bonnie Sinclair

Costumes 2nd Assistant

Ronnie Specter

Makeup

Michael Storey

Music

Ken Teaney

Sound Rerecording

Allen Toussaint

Song ("Working In A Coal Mine")

Peter Tullo

Property Master Assistant

Isabella B Van Soest

Costume Designer

Ermelando Vasquez

Caterer Assistant

Jack Vinson

Driver

Llewellyn Wells

Unit Production Manager

Richard Whaley

Music Recording

Janis Wildy

Art Department Production Assistant

Tom Williams

Carpenter

Karen Wyatt

Video Researcher

Elizabeth Yoffe

Casting (Seattle)

Frank Zappa

Song ("Memories Of El Monte")

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1990
Production Company
Cinema Research Corporation; Clein & White Public Relations; Pressman Film
Distribution Company
SONY PICTURES RELEASING INTERNATIONAL/TRIUMPH RELEASING; Entertainment Film Distributors, Ltd.; Hoyts Distribution; Sony Pictures Home Entertainment; Sony Pictures Releasing International; Sony Pictures Releasing International; Tohokushinsha Film Corporation; Triumph Releasing
Location
Tacoma, Washington, USA; Seattle, Washington, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Articles

Vincent Schiavelli (1948-2005)


American Actor Vincent Schiavelli, a classic "I know the face but not the name" character player who had prominent roles in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Nightshift and Ghost, died at his Sicily home after a long battle with lung cancer on December 26. He was 57.

He was born on November 10, 1948 in Brooklyn, New York. After he studied acting at New York University's School of the Arts, he quickly landed a role in Milos Foreman's Taking Off (1971), and his career in the movies seldom dropped a beat. Seriously, to not recognize Schiavelli's presence in a movie or television episode for the last 30 years means you don't watch much of either medium, for his tall, gawky physique (a towering 6'6"), droopy eyes, sagging neck skin, and elongated chin made him a casting director's dream for offbeat and eccentric parts.

But it wasn't just a striking presence that fueled his career, Schiavelli could deliver the fine performances. Foreman would use him again as one of the mental ward inmates in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975); and he was hilarious as the put-upon science teacher, Mr. Vargas in Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982); worked for Foreman again as Salieri's (F. Murray Abraham's) valet in Amadeus (1984); unforgettable as an embittered subway ghost who taunts Patrick Swayze in Ghost (1990); downright creepy as the brooding organ grinder in Batman Returns (1992); worked with Foreman one last time in The People vs. Larry Flynt (1996); and was a dependable eccentric in Death to Smoochy (2002). Television was no stranger to him either. Although he displayed a gift for comedy playing Latka's (Andy Kaufman) confidant priest, "Reverend Gorky" in a recurring role of Taxi, the actor spent much of his time enlivening shows of the other worldly variety such as Star Trek: The Next Generation, Tales from the Crypt, The X Files, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

In recent years, Schiavelli curtailed the acting, and concentrated on writing. He recently relocated to the Sicilian village of Polizzi Generosa, where his grandparents were raised. He concentrated on his love of cooking and in 2002, wrote a highly praised memoir of his family's history as well as some cooking recipes of his grandfather's titled Many Beautiful Things. He is survived by two children.

by Michael T. Toole
Vincent Schiavelli (1948-2005)

Vincent Schiavelli (1948-2005)

American Actor Vincent Schiavelli, a classic "I know the face but not the name" character player who had prominent roles in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Nightshift and Ghost, died at his Sicily home after a long battle with lung cancer on December 26. He was 57. He was born on November 10, 1948 in Brooklyn, New York. After he studied acting at New York University's School of the Arts, he quickly landed a role in Milos Foreman's Taking Off (1971), and his career in the movies seldom dropped a beat. Seriously, to not recognize Schiavelli's presence in a movie or television episode for the last 30 years means you don't watch much of either medium, for his tall, gawky physique (a towering 6'6"), droopy eyes, sagging neck skin, and elongated chin made him a casting director's dream for offbeat and eccentric parts. But it wasn't just a striking presence that fueled his career, Schiavelli could deliver the fine performances. Foreman would use him again as one of the mental ward inmates in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975); and he was hilarious as the put-upon science teacher, Mr. Vargas in Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982); worked for Foreman again as Salieri's (F. Murray Abraham's) valet in Amadeus (1984); unforgettable as an embittered subway ghost who taunts Patrick Swayze in Ghost (1990); downright creepy as the brooding organ grinder in Batman Returns (1992); worked with Foreman one last time in The People vs. Larry Flynt (1996); and was a dependable eccentric in Death to Smoochy (2002). Television was no stranger to him either. Although he displayed a gift for comedy playing Latka's (Andy Kaufman) confidant priest, "Reverend Gorky" in a recurring role of Taxi, the actor spent much of his time enlivening shows of the other worldly variety such as Star Trek: The Next Generation, Tales from the Crypt, The X Files, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. In recent years, Schiavelli curtailed the acting, and concentrated on writing. He recently relocated to the Sicilian village of Polizzi Generosa, where his grandparents were raised. He concentrated on his love of cooking and in 2002, wrote a highly praised memoir of his family's history as well as some cooking recipes of his grandfather's titled Many Beautiful Things. He is survived by two children. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall November 2, 1990

Released in United States on Video September 18, 1991

Released in United States February 1990

Released in United States September 1990

Shown at Berlin Film Festival (Panorama) February 9-20, 1990.

Shown at Toronto Festival of Festivals (Contemporary World Cinema) September 6-15, 1990.

Began shooting May 3, 1989.

Released in United States Fall November 2, 1990

Released in United States February 1990 (Shown at Berlin Film Festival (Panorama) February 9-20, 1990.)

Released in United States September 1990 (Shown at Toronto Festival of Festivals (Contemporary World Cinema) September 6-15, 1990.)

Released in United States on Video September 18, 1991