Roger & Me


1h 30m 1989
Roger & Me

Brief Synopsis

Documentary about the elimination of 30,000 jobs in Flint, Michigan by General Motors.

Film Details

Also Known As
Roger & Me: A Humorous Look at How General Motors Destroyed Flint, Michigan, Roger & jag, Roger and Me, Roger et moi
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Documentary
Release Date
1989
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)/WARNER BROS. PICTURES INTERNATIONAL (WBI)
Location
Flint, Michigan, USA; Detroit, Michigan, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Synopsis

Documentary about the elimination of 30,000 jobs in Flint, Michigan by General Motors.

Crew

Bob Andersen

Production Assistant

Diana Anderson

Production Assistant

Buddy Arnold

Song

Charlie Arnot

Sound

Terry Asher

Song

Edward Asner

Other

Hoyt Axton

Song

Burt Bacharach

Song

Lynda Bahaudin

Assistant Editor

Pat Barrie

Sound

Chuck Barris

Song

Christopher Beaver

Camera

Brian Beck

Other

Clarita Beck

Other

Milton Berle

Song

Rod Birleson

Production Coordinator

Rod Birleson

Sound

Jeff Bloomer

Production Assistant

Anne Bohlen

Production Coordinator

Pat Boone

Song Performer

Gary Boren

Other

Anita Bryant

Song Performer

William Bryce

Production Assistant

Vinnie Bui

Assistant Editor

Betty Cooke

Other

J. Fred Coots

Song

Larry Coppola

Other

Paula Coppola

Other

Lloyd Dangle

Sound

Hal David

Song

John Denver

Song

B. G. Desylva

Song

Robert Edgerton

Other

Ruth Edgerton

Finance Manager

Kevin Fallis

Sound

Adam Fleishman

Assistant Editor

Amy Flynn

Assistant Editor

Dana Foote

Sound

Ronna Foote

Camera

Ronna Foote

Assistant Sound Editor

Connie Francis

Song Performer

Haven Gillespie

Song

Kathleen Glynn

Production Assistant

Kathleen Glynn

Titles

Kathleen Glynn

Coproducer

Norman Gottlieb

Other

Vivian Gottlieb

Other

Woody Guthrie

Song

Thomas Hall

Sound

Pansy Hawkins

Other

William Hayden

Other

Eugene Herzog

Other

Sally Herzog

Other

David Hill

Song

Mildred Hill

Song

Patty Hill

Song

Bruce Hornsby

Song Performer

Bruce Hornsby

Song

Andrea Hull

Sound Editing

Judy Irving

Sound

Judy Irving

Camera

Al Jolson

Song

Francine Jones

Production Assistant

Larry Jones

Other

Rebecca Kanner

Production Assistant

Buddy Kaye

Song

Frank Kolinski

Other

Richard Kronenberg

Assistant Editor

F I Lankey

Song

Stephanie Laubrick

Production Assistant

Ethel Lee

Song

Jerry Leiber

Song

Paula Longendyke

Production Assistant

Gene Maclellan

Song

Albert Malotte

Song

Artie Malvin

Song

The Michigan State University Marching Band

Song Performer

Ann Mathews

Other

Dwight Matlock

Sound

Regina Mcnulty

Other

Pat Megison

Production Assistant

Joseph Meyer

Song

Frank Moore

Other

Michael Moore

Producer

Michael Moore

Screenplay

Veronica Moore

Other

Andrew Morehouse

Production Assistant

Miguel Munoz

Titles And Opticals

Daniel S Noga

Camera

David Petersen

Editing

David Petersen

Sound Editing

Becky Pettengill

Other

Dave Pettengill

Other

Our Tuesday Night Bingo Players

Other

Richard Prelinger

Researcher

Barbara Prusak

Production Assistant

John Prusak

Camera

Keith Prusak

Production Assistant

Robert Prusak

Sound

Kevin Rafferty

Camera

Kurt Rauf

Camera

Kate Reed

Assistant Sound Editor

Christopher Reilly

Production Assistant

Gini Reticker

Editing

David O. Rogers

Assistant Editor

Nathan Schafer

Other

Bruce Schermer

Sound

Bruce Schermer

Camera

Jerry Seelan

Song

Bertha Serich

Other

Val Sklar

Production Assistant

Bruce Springsteen

Song

Bruce Springsteen

Song Performer

Melissa Stanzler

Production Assistant

Wendey Stanzler

Editor

Wendey Stanzler

Associate Producer

Josef Steiff

Production Assistant

Susan Steigerwalt

Other

Mike Stoller

Song

Sue Stone

Other

Jim Torres

Sound

Marilyn Trent

Production Assistant

Readers Of The Michigan Voice

Other

Peter Waggoner

Sound Mixer

Bernie Wayne

Song

Carl Weiss

Music Arranger

Jennifer Beman White

Editor

Jennifer Beman White

Sound Editor

Mark White

Assistant Editor

Robert Wilhelm

Sound

Robert Wilhelm

Production Coordinator

Brian Wilson

Song

David Zaremba

Camera

John Zweifler

Other

Ruth Zweifler

Other

Film Details

Also Known As
Roger & Me: A Humorous Look at How General Motors Destroyed Flint, Michigan, Roger & jag, Roger and Me, Roger et moi
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Documentary
Release Date
1989
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)/WARNER BROS. PICTURES INTERNATIONAL (WBI)
Location
Flint, Michigan, USA; Detroit, Michigan, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Articles

Roger & Me -


When filmmaker Michael Moore's hometown of Flint, Michigan was devastated by General Motors' decision to close its auto manufacturing plants and ship the jobs to Mexico, throwing thousands out of work, he decided to confront the elusive CEO, Roger Smith, to get some answers. The result was a landmark documentary, Roger & Me (1989), which Esquire recently called "less like a documentary and more like a work of prophecy." In it, Moore shines a light on both the economic destruction of Flint and the seeming indifference by the wealthy executives who caused it.

Moore, the former editor of Mother Jones magazine (and whose father worked on an auto assembly line), left his day job and independently financed the film himself, beginning in 1986. It took two years to shoot Roger & Me, and while Moore ultimately managed to track Smith down, the chairman would not speak with or accompany Moore to Flint to see the pain and suffering he had caused. Roger & Me by turns induces laughter and anger, but was it completely factual? When the film was released in 1989, Moore was accused of manipulating chronological events for dramatic purposes by Harlan Jacobson, then co-editor of Film Comment .

In his article, Jacobson charged that Moore "created the impression of a direct sequence of events that didn't happen in Flint in the one-to-one casual fashion his documentary implies." For example, while Ronald Reagan did appear in Flint, eating pizza with laid off workers and suggesting that they move to Texas, it did not happen while he was president, but while he was still a candidate. The creation of the doomed Auto World amusement park (built to recreate the glory of old Flint and the auto industry, right down to a fake Main Street, while the real Main Street was being shuttered), which cost and lost millions, happened before GM closed the plants, not after. Moore was further accused of overstating the amount of actual jobs lost by 20,000. Pauline Kael, in her review for The New Yorker eviscerated the film, calling it "an aw-shucks, cracker-barrel pastiche" that was created by "a slick ad exec [who] comes on in a give-'em hell style, but he breaks faith with the audience."

Moore's response to his critics was that "no documentary is in linear chronological order. If you're looking for that, watch C-SPAN. [...] I wanted to paint a portrait of this town in the '80s. I never said that the film began in 1986. I consciously avoided using dates. Everything depicted did stem from the closing of the plants. [...] People never heard of a docucomedy but I tried to make a film people want to see." And see it they did. Despite the controversy, Moore sold the rights to Warner Bros. for a reported $3 million, and was the darling of the film festival circuit. He has gone on to win numerous awards for his hard-hitting looks at subjects like gun violence, capitalism, and the events surrounding the attacks on 9/11. Most recently, he has starred in a one-man show Michael Moore in TrumpLand (2016) about the current election cycle and the division it has caused in the United States.

SOURCES:
Dutka, Elaine "Will Controversy Cost 'Roger' an Oscar?" The Los Angeles Times 17 Jan 90
Ebert, Roger "Attacks On 'Roger & Me' Completely Miss Point Of Film" Chicago Sun-Times 11 Feb 90
The Internet Movie Database
Marche, Stephen "Michael Moore's Roger & Me at 25: Still the Best Movie About the U.S. Economic Collapse: Why you should re-watch the 1989 documentary about corporate greed" Esquire 19 Dec 14

By Lorraine LoBianco
Roger & Me -

Roger & Me -

When filmmaker Michael Moore's hometown of Flint, Michigan was devastated by General Motors' decision to close its auto manufacturing plants and ship the jobs to Mexico, throwing thousands out of work, he decided to confront the elusive CEO, Roger Smith, to get some answers. The result was a landmark documentary, Roger & Me (1989), which Esquire recently called "less like a documentary and more like a work of prophecy." In it, Moore shines a light on both the economic destruction of Flint and the seeming indifference by the wealthy executives who caused it. Moore, the former editor of Mother Jones magazine (and whose father worked on an auto assembly line), left his day job and independently financed the film himself, beginning in 1986. It took two years to shoot Roger & Me, and while Moore ultimately managed to track Smith down, the chairman would not speak with or accompany Moore to Flint to see the pain and suffering he had caused. Roger & Me by turns induces laughter and anger, but was it completely factual? When the film was released in 1989, Moore was accused of manipulating chronological events for dramatic purposes by Harlan Jacobson, then co-editor of Film Comment . In his article, Jacobson charged that Moore "created the impression of a direct sequence of events that didn't happen in Flint in the one-to-one casual fashion his documentary implies." For example, while Ronald Reagan did appear in Flint, eating pizza with laid off workers and suggesting that they move to Texas, it did not happen while he was president, but while he was still a candidate. The creation of the doomed Auto World amusement park (built to recreate the glory of old Flint and the auto industry, right down to a fake Main Street, while the real Main Street was being shuttered), which cost and lost millions, happened before GM closed the plants, not after. Moore was further accused of overstating the amount of actual jobs lost by 20,000. Pauline Kael, in her review for The New Yorker eviscerated the film, calling it "an aw-shucks, cracker-barrel pastiche" that was created by "a slick ad exec [who] comes on in a give-'em hell style, but he breaks faith with the audience." Moore's response to his critics was that "no documentary is in linear chronological order. If you're looking for that, watch C-SPAN. [...] I wanted to paint a portrait of this town in the '80s. I never said that the film began in 1986. I consciously avoided using dates. Everything depicted did stem from the closing of the plants. [...] People never heard of a docucomedy but I tried to make a film people want to see." And see it they did. Despite the controversy, Moore sold the rights to Warner Bros. for a reported $3 million, and was the darling of the film festival circuit. He has gone on to win numerous awards for his hard-hitting looks at subjects like gun violence, capitalism, and the events surrounding the attacks on 9/11. Most recently, he has starred in a one-man show Michael Moore in TrumpLand (2016) about the current election cycle and the division it has caused in the United States. SOURCES: Dutka, Elaine "Will Controversy Cost 'Roger' an Oscar?" The Los Angeles Times 17 Jan 90 Ebert, Roger "Attacks On 'Roger & Me' Completely Miss Point Of Film" Chicago Sun-Times 11 Feb 90 The Internet Movie Database Marche, Stephen "Michael Moore's Roger & Me at 25: Still the Best Movie About the U.S. Economic Collapse: Why you should re-watch the 1989 documentary about corporate greed" Esquire 19 Dec 14 By Lorraine LoBianco

Roger & Me


When filmmaker Michael Moore's hometown of Flint, Michigan was devastated by General Motors' decision to close its auto manufacturing plants and ship the jobs to Mexico, throwing thousands out of work, he decided to confront the elusive CEO, Roger Smith, to get some answers. The result was a landmark documentary, Roger and Me (1989), which Esquire recently called "less like a documentary and more like a work of prophecy." In it, Moore shines a light on both the economic destruction of Flint and the seeming indifference by the wealthy executives who caused it.

Moore, the former editor of Mother Jones magazine (and whose father worked on an auto assembly line), left his day job and independently financed the film himself, beginning in 1986. It took two years to shoot Roger and Me , and while Moore ultimately managed to track Smith down, the chairman would not speak with or accompany Moore to Flint to see the pain and suffering he had caused. Roger and Me by turns, induces laughter and anger, but was it completely factual? When the film was released in 1989, Moore was accused of manipulating chronological events for dramatic purposes by Harlan Jacobson, then co-editor of Film Comment . In his article, Jacobson charged that Moore "created the impression of a direct sequence of events that didn't happen in Flint in the one-to-one casual fashion his documentary implies." For example, while Ronald Reagan did appear in Flint, eating pizza with laid off workers and suggesting that they move to Texas, it did not happen while he was president, but while he was still a candidate. The creation of the doomed Auto World amusement park (built to recreate the glory of old Flint and the auto industry, right down to a fake Main Street, while the real Main Street was being shuttered), which cost and lost millions, happened before GM closed the plants, not after. Moore was further accused of overstating the amount of actual jobs lost by 20,000. Pauline Kael, in her review for The New Yorker eviscerated the film, calling it "an aw-shucks, cracker-barrel pastiche" that was created by "a slick ad exec [who] comes on in a give-'em hell style, but he breaks faith with the audience."

Moore's response to his critics was that "no documentary is in linear chronological order. If you're looking for that, watch C-SPAN. [...] I wanted to paint a portrait of this town in the '80s. I never said that the film began in 1986. I consciously avoided using dates. Everything depicted did stem from the closing of the plants. [...] People never heard of a docucomedy but I tried to make a film people want to see." And see it they did. Despite the controversy, Moore sold the rights to Warner Bros. for a reported $3 million, and was the darling of the film festival circuit. He has gone on to win numerous awards for his hard-hitting looks at subjects like gun violence, capitalism, and the events surrounding the attacks on 9/11. Most recently, he has starred in a one-man show Michael Moore in TrumpLand (2016) about the current election cycle and the division it has caused in the United States.

By Lorraine LoBianco

SOURCES:

Dutka, Elaine "Will Controversy Cost 'Roger' an Oscar?" The Los Angeles Times 17 Jan 90
Ebert, Roger "Attacks On 'Roger & Me' Completely Miss Point Of Film" Chicago Sun-Times 11 Feb 90
The Internet Movie Database
Marche, Stephen "Michael Moore's Roger & Me at 25: Still the Best Movie About the U.S. Economic Collapse: Why you should re-watch the 1989 documentary about corporate greed" Esquire 19 Dec 14

Roger & Me

When filmmaker Michael Moore's hometown of Flint, Michigan was devastated by General Motors' decision to close its auto manufacturing plants and ship the jobs to Mexico, throwing thousands out of work, he decided to confront the elusive CEO, Roger Smith, to get some answers. The result was a landmark documentary, Roger and Me (1989), which Esquire recently called "less like a documentary and more like a work of prophecy." In it, Moore shines a light on both the economic destruction of Flint and the seeming indifference by the wealthy executives who caused it. Moore, the former editor of Mother Jones magazine (and whose father worked on an auto assembly line), left his day job and independently financed the film himself, beginning in 1986. It took two years to shoot Roger and Me , and while Moore ultimately managed to track Smith down, the chairman would not speak with or accompany Moore to Flint to see the pain and suffering he had caused. Roger and Me by turns, induces laughter and anger, but was it completely factual? When the film was released in 1989, Moore was accused of manipulating chronological events for dramatic purposes by Harlan Jacobson, then co-editor of Film Comment . In his article, Jacobson charged that Moore "created the impression of a direct sequence of events that didn't happen in Flint in the one-to-one casual fashion his documentary implies." For example, while Ronald Reagan did appear in Flint, eating pizza with laid off workers and suggesting that they move to Texas, it did not happen while he was president, but while he was still a candidate. The creation of the doomed Auto World amusement park (built to recreate the glory of old Flint and the auto industry, right down to a fake Main Street, while the real Main Street was being shuttered), which cost and lost millions, happened before GM closed the plants, not after. Moore was further accused of overstating the amount of actual jobs lost by 20,000. Pauline Kael, in her review for The New Yorker eviscerated the film, calling it "an aw-shucks, cracker-barrel pastiche" that was created by "a slick ad exec [who] comes on in a give-'em hell style, but he breaks faith with the audience." Moore's response to his critics was that "no documentary is in linear chronological order. If you're looking for that, watch C-SPAN. [...] I wanted to paint a portrait of this town in the '80s. I never said that the film began in 1986. I consciously avoided using dates. Everything depicted did stem from the closing of the plants. [...] People never heard of a docucomedy but I tried to make a film people want to see." And see it they did. Despite the controversy, Moore sold the rights to Warner Bros. for a reported $3 million, and was the darling of the film festival circuit. He has gone on to win numerous awards for his hard-hitting looks at subjects like gun violence, capitalism, and the events surrounding the attacks on 9/11. Most recently, he has starred in a one-man show Michael Moore in TrumpLand (2016) about the current election cycle and the division it has caused in the United States. By Lorraine LoBianco SOURCES: Dutka, Elaine "Will Controversy Cost 'Roger' an Oscar?" The Los Angeles Times 17 Jan 90 Ebert, Roger "Attacks On 'Roger & Me' Completely Miss Point Of Film" Chicago Sun-Times 11 Feb 90 The Internet Movie Database Marche, Stephen "Michael Moore's Roger & Me at 25: Still the Best Movie About the U.S. Economic Collapse: Why you should re-watch the 1989 documentary about corporate greed" Esquire 19 Dec 14

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States December 20, 1989

Released in United States on Video June 20, 1990

Released in United States September 1989

Released in United States October 1989

Released in United States October 28, 1989

Released in United States November 1989

Released in United States 1990

Released in United States January 1990

Released in United States February 1990

Shown at New York Film Festival September 27 & 28, 1989.

Shown at Toronto Festival of Festivals September 9& 11, 1989.

Shown at Vancouver International Film Festival October 7, 9 & 15, 1989.

Shown at Independent Feature Film Market (IFFM) in New York City October 4-13, 1989.

Shown at Greater Fort Lauderdale Film Festival October 28, 1989.

Shown at London Film Festival November 10-26, 1989.

Shown at United States Film Festival Park City, Utah January 20-28, 1990.

Shown at Berlin Film Festival February 9-20, 1990.

Warner Bros paid an estimated $3,000,000 for the acquisition of "Roger & Me" which also included providing $25,000 for homeless families affected by the closing of General Motors.

Feature directorial debut for former "Mother Jones" editor Michael Moore.

Released in United States Winter December 19, 1989

Released in United States December 20, 1989 (New York City and Los Angeles)

Released in United States on Video June 20, 1990

Released in United States September 1989 (Shown at New York Film Festival September 27 & 28, 1989.)

Released in United States September 1989 (Shown at Toronto Festival of Festivals September 9& 11, 1989.)

Released in United States October 1989 (Shown at Vancouver International Film Festival October 7, 9 & 15, 1989.)

Released in United States October 1989 (Shown at Independent Feature Film Market (IFFM) in New York City October 4-13, 1989.)

Released in United States October 28, 1989 (Shown at Greater Fort Lauderdale Film Festival October 28, 1989.)

Released in United States 1990 (Shown at AFI/Los Angeles International Film Festival (U.S. Indie Showcase - Documentaries) April 19 - May 3, 1990.)

Released in United States January 1990 (Shown at United States Film Festival Park City, Utah January 20-28, 1990.)

Released in United States February 1990 (Shown at Berlin Film Festival February 9-20, 1990.)

Released in United States Winter December 19, 1989

Released in United States November 1989 (Shown at London Film Festival November 10-26, 1989.)