John Grisham's The Rainmaker


2h 17m 1997

Brief Synopsis

A young law student takes on a case against the insurance industry when an indigent family's son dies after being denied medical care.

Film Details

Also Known As
Rainmaker, Regnmakaren
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Thriller
Adaptation
Release Date
1997
Distribution Company
PARAMOUNT PICTURES/UNITED INTERNATIONAL PICTURES (UIP)
Location
Alameda, California, USA; Memphis, Tennessee, USA; San Francisco, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 17m

Synopsis

Struggling new attorney Rudy Baylor resorts to working for a shady lawyer, where he meets paralegal Deck Shifflet. When the insurance company of Dot Black refuses her dying son coverage, Baylor and Shifflet team up to fight the corrupt corporation, taking on its callous lawyer. Meanwhile, Baylor becomes involved with Kelly Riker, an abused wife, whose husband complicates matters when he confronts Baylor.

Crew

Michael Amundson

Assistant Director

Kim Aubry

Post-Production Supervisor

Paul Babin

Camera Operator

Bob Baron

Adr Mixer

Mark Berger

Rerecording

Elmer Bernstein

Music

Elmer Bernstein

Original Music

David Betancourt

Foley Mixer

Katherine E Beyda

Production Supervisor

Katherine E Beyda

Unit Production Manager

Eddie Boyd

Song

Lois Burwell

Makeup Artist

Kim B Christensen

Sound Effects Editor

Guy Clayton

Special Effects Coordinator

David A. Cohen

Dialogue Editor

Francis Ford Coppola

Executive Producer

Francis Ford Coppola

Screenplay

Howard Cummings

Production Designer

Jimmie Davis

Song

Tony Dingman

Other

Michael Douglas

Producer

Kathy Durning

Music Editor

Scott Elias

Location Manager

Wayne Emmons

Consultant

Wayne Emmons

Advisor

Jane Feather

Song

Dawn Fintor

Foley Artist

Wayne Fitzgerald

Titles

Michael Floquet

Assistant Director

Laura Folger

Location Casting

Clare Freeman

Adr Editor

Fred Fuchs

Producer

Jack Gill

Stunt Coordinator

Danny Glover

Other

Reuben Goldberg

Special Effects

John Grisham

Source Material

John Grisham

Source Material (From Novel)

Kenneth Haber

Location Manager

Lauren Hallinan

Consultant

Patrick Hallinan

Consultant

Slim Harpo

Song Performer

Barbara Harris

Adr Voice Casting

Michael Herr

Other Writer

Larry Hoki

Other

Georgia Kacandes

Coproducer

Georgia Kacandes

Unit Production Manager

David Kelley

Assistant Director

Melissa Kent

Editor

B. B. King

Song Performer

Michael Kirchberger

Sound Editor

Bruce Lacey

Adr Editor

Mark Levinson

Adr Editor

Bill Lunn

Other

Barry Malkin

Editor

Gary Marcus

Associate Producer

Gary Marcus

Assistant Director

Brick Mason

Storyboard Artist

Polly Ann Mattson

Assistant Director

Eugene Mccarthy

Property Master

Dave Mcdonald

Adr

Jeffrey D Mcdonald

Art Director

Charles Mitchell

Song

James Moore

Song

Barbara Munch

Set Decorator

Scott P. Murphy

Set Designer

Doug Murray

Adr

Anahid Nazarian

Script Supervisor

Davia Nelson

Location Casting

Tim O'shea

Foley Editor

E Larry Oatfield

Dialogue Editor

Leslie Park

Script Supervisor

Linda Phillips-palo

Casting

Joseph Piantadosi

Foley Recordist

Steven Reuther

Producer

Matt Robertson

Production Assistant

Aggie Guerard Rodgers

Costume Designer

Arturo Rojas

Hair Stylist

Fred Roos

Casting Associate

Michael Semanick

Rerecording

Bob Shaw

Art Director

David Sousa

Animal Wrangler

Alicia M Stevenson

Foley Artist

Dianna Stirpe

Dialogue Editor

Nelson Stroll

Sound Mixer

Laura Tateischi

Production Coordinator

John Toll

Director Of Photography

John Toll

Other

T-bone Walker

Song

Dan Wallin

Music

Jennifer Ware

Sound Effects Editor

Don Was

Music

Buddy Waters

Song Performer

Winnie Brown Willis

Costume Supervisor

Robert Yeoman

Director Of Photography

Robert Yeoman

Other

Paul Zydel

Adr Mixer

Film Details

Also Known As
Rainmaker, Regnmakaren
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Thriller
Adaptation
Release Date
1997
Distribution Company
PARAMOUNT PICTURES/UNITED INTERNATIONAL PICTURES (UIP)
Location
Alameda, California, USA; Memphis, Tennessee, USA; San Francisco, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 17m

Articles

Teresa Wright (1918-2005)


Teresa Wright, a talented, Oscar&-winning leading lady of the '40s, and in later life, a versatile character player, died on March 6 at a New Haven, Connecticut hospital of a heart attack. She was 86.

She was born Muriel Teresa Wright in New York City on October 27, 1918. She showed a keen interest in acting in grade school, and by the time she was 19, she made her Broadway debut in Thorton Wilder's Our Town (1938); the following year she scored a hit as Mary, the weeping ingénue in Life with Father (1939). The word was out that New York had a superb young acting talent on hand, and Samuel Goldwyn soon brought her to Hollywood for William Wyler's adaptation of Lillian Hellman's The Little Foxes (1941). She scored an Oscar® nomination for her film debut as Regina Giddens' (Bette Davis), honorable daughter, Alexandria.

She maintained her amazing momentum by scoring two Oscar® nominations the following year for her next two films: as Carol Miniver in Wyler's Mrs. Miniver (Best Supporting Actress Category), and as Lou Gehrig's (Gary Cooper) faithful wife Ellie in Pride of the Yankees (Best Actress Category), and won the Oscar for Miniver. Yet for most fans of Wright's work, her finest hour remains her perfectly modulated performance as young Charlie in Alfred Hitchcock's masterpiece, Shadow of a Doubt (1943). Wright's performance as the self-effacing, impressionable young niece who gradually realizes that her beloved uncle (Joseph Cotton) may have murdered several widows is effective since Wright's air of observation, subtly turns from idol gazing, to a watchful air of caution as the facts slowly being to unravel. 60 years on, fans of Hitchcock still acclaim Wright's performance as an integral part of the film's classic status.

She proved her talents in comedy with the delightful Casanova Brown (1944), but then saw her schedule slow down due to domesticity. After she married screenwriter Niven Busch in 1942, she gave birth to son, Niven Jr., in 1944, and took two years off to look after her family. She soon returned to film with another Wyler project, the Oscar®-winning, post war drama, The Best Years of Our Lives (1946), playing Fredric March's level-headed daughter, Peggy, she again took some time off after giving birth to her daughter, Mary in 1947. On her second attempt to return to the big screen, Wright found her popularity on the wane. Her wholesome image was in sharp contrast of the tougher, more modern women in post-war Hollywood, and her stubborn refusal to pose for any swimsuit or cheesecake photos to alter her image led to her release from Sam Goldwyn's contract.

As a freelance actress, Wright still found some good roles, notably as a young widow in the thriller scripted by her husband, in The Capture; and as a faithful fiancée trying to help Marlin Brandon deal with his amputation in Stanley Kramer's The Men (both 1950). Yet within a few years, she was playing middle-aged mothers in film like The Actress (1953), and The Track of the Cat (1954), even though she was still in her early '30s. By the mid-50s she found work in live television, where she could apply her stage training, in a number of acclaimed shows: Playhouse 90, General Electric Theater, Four Star Playhouse, and The United States Steel Hour.

She took a break from acting when she married her second husband, the playwright Robert Anderson in 1959, (she had divorced her first husband, Busch, in 1952) and was out of the public eye for several decades, save for an isolated theater appearance. When she did return, it was intermittent, but she was always worth watching. In James Ivory's Roseland (1977), a portrait of the New York dancehall; she was poignant as a talkative widow obsessed with her late husband; and as an enigmatic old actress in Somewhere in Time, she nearly stole the picture from leads, Christopher Reeve and Jayne Seymour. She was still active in the '90s, appearing a few hit shows: Murder, She Wrote, Picket Fences; and a final film role in John Grisham's The Rainmaker (1997). She is survived by her son, Niven; daughter, Mary; and two grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Teresa Wright (1918-2005)

Teresa Wright (1918-2005)

Teresa Wright, a talented, Oscar&-winning leading lady of the '40s, and in later life, a versatile character player, died on March 6 at a New Haven, Connecticut hospital of a heart attack. She was 86. She was born Muriel Teresa Wright in New York City on October 27, 1918. She showed a keen interest in acting in grade school, and by the time she was 19, she made her Broadway debut in Thorton Wilder's Our Town (1938); the following year she scored a hit as Mary, the weeping ingénue in Life with Father (1939). The word was out that New York had a superb young acting talent on hand, and Samuel Goldwyn soon brought her to Hollywood for William Wyler's adaptation of Lillian Hellman's The Little Foxes (1941). She scored an Oscar® nomination for her film debut as Regina Giddens' (Bette Davis), honorable daughter, Alexandria. She maintained her amazing momentum by scoring two Oscar® nominations the following year for her next two films: as Carol Miniver in Wyler's Mrs. Miniver (Best Supporting Actress Category), and as Lou Gehrig's (Gary Cooper) faithful wife Ellie in Pride of the Yankees (Best Actress Category), and won the Oscar for Miniver. Yet for most fans of Wright's work, her finest hour remains her perfectly modulated performance as young Charlie in Alfred Hitchcock's masterpiece, Shadow of a Doubt (1943). Wright's performance as the self-effacing, impressionable young niece who gradually realizes that her beloved uncle (Joseph Cotton) may have murdered several widows is effective since Wright's air of observation, subtly turns from idol gazing, to a watchful air of caution as the facts slowly being to unravel. 60 years on, fans of Hitchcock still acclaim Wright's performance as an integral part of the film's classic status. She proved her talents in comedy with the delightful Casanova Brown (1944), but then saw her schedule slow down due to domesticity. After she married screenwriter Niven Busch in 1942, she gave birth to son, Niven Jr., in 1944, and took two years off to look after her family. She soon returned to film with another Wyler project, the Oscar®-winning, post war drama, The Best Years of Our Lives (1946), playing Fredric March's level-headed daughter, Peggy, she again took some time off after giving birth to her daughter, Mary in 1947. On her second attempt to return to the big screen, Wright found her popularity on the wane. Her wholesome image was in sharp contrast of the tougher, more modern women in post-war Hollywood, and her stubborn refusal to pose for any swimsuit or cheesecake photos to alter her image led to her release from Sam Goldwyn's contract. As a freelance actress, Wright still found some good roles, notably as a young widow in the thriller scripted by her husband, in The Capture; and as a faithful fiancée trying to help Marlin Brandon deal with his amputation in Stanley Kramer's The Men (both 1950). Yet within a few years, she was playing middle-aged mothers in film like The Actress (1953), and The Track of the Cat (1954), even though she was still in her early '30s. By the mid-50s she found work in live television, where she could apply her stage training, in a number of acclaimed shows: Playhouse 90, General Electric Theater, Four Star Playhouse, and The United States Steel Hour. She took a break from acting when she married her second husband, the playwright Robert Anderson in 1959, (she had divorced her first husband, Busch, in 1952) and was out of the public eye for several decades, save for an isolated theater appearance. When she did return, it was intermittent, but she was always worth watching. In James Ivory's Roseland (1977), a portrait of the New York dancehall; she was poignant as a talkative widow obsessed with her late husband; and as an enigmatic old actress in Somewhere in Time, she nearly stole the picture from leads, Christopher Reeve and Jayne Seymour. She was still active in the '90s, appearing a few hit shows: Murder, She Wrote, Picket Fences; and a final film role in John Grisham's The Rainmaker (1997). She is survived by her son, Niven; daughter, Mary; and two grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall November 21, 1997

Released in United States on Video May 26, 1998

Released in United States February 1998

Released in United States March 1998

Shown at Olso Film Days in Oslo, Norway February 6-12, 1998.

Shown at Dublin Film Festival March 3-12, 1998.

Constellation Films is a financing and distribution company (co-owned by Michael Douglas, Steven Reuther, and Bobo Scriba) that will handle films produced by Douglas/Reuther.

Began shooting October 7, 1996.

Completed shooting February 6, 1997.

Released in United States Fall November 21, 1997

Released in United States on Video May 26, 1998

Released in United States February 1998 (Shown at Olso Film Days in Oslo, Norway February 6-12, 1998.)

Released in United States March 1998 (Shown at Dublin Film Festival March 3-12, 1998.)