American Hot Wax


1h 31m 1978

Brief Synopsis

It is the early 1950s, and disc jockey Alan Freed is promoting a new style of music called rock and roll. Freed is attempting to stage the very first live rock show at Brooklyn's Paramount Theatre, but in order to do so he has to the outrage and angry protests of parents, political conservatives and the local police.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Documentary
Musical
Release Date
Jan 1978
Premiere Information
not available
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 31m
Sound
Stereo
Color
Color (Metrocolor)

Synopsis

It is the early 1950s, and disc jockey Alan Freed is promoting a new style of music called rock and roll. Freed is attempting to stage the very first live rock show at Brooklyn's Paramount Theatre, but in order to do so he has to the outrage and angry protests of parents, political conservatives, and the local police.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Documentary
Musical
Release Date
Jan 1978
Premiere Information
not available
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 31m
Sound
Stereo
Color
Color (Metrocolor)

Articles

Hamilton Camp (1934-2005)


Hamilton Camp, the diminutive yet effervescent actor and singer-songwriter, who spent nearly his entire life in show business, including several appearances in both television and films, died of a heart attack on October 2 at his Los Angeles home. He was 70.

He was born October 30, 1934, in London, England. After World War II, he moved to Canada and then to Long Beach with his mother and sister, where the siblings performed in USO shows. In 1946, he made his first movie, Bedlam starring Boris Karloff as an extra (as Bobby Camp) and continued in that vein until he played Thorpe, one of Dean Stockwell's classmates in Kim (1950).

After Kim he received some more slightly prominent parts in films: a messenger boy in Titanic (1953); and a mailroom attendant in Executive Suite (1954), but overall, Camp was never a steadily working child actor.

Camp relocated to Chicago in the late '50s and rediscovered his childhood passion - music. He began playing in small clubs around the Chicago area, and he struck oil when he partnered with a New York based folk artist, Bob Gibson in 1961. The pair worked in clubs all over the midwest and they soon became known for their tight vocal harmonies and Gibson's 12-string guitar style. Late in 1961, they recorded an album - Gibson and Camp at the Gate of Horn, the Gate of Horn being the most renowned music venue in Chicago for the burgeoning folk scene. The record may have aged a bit over the years, but it is admired as an important progress in folk music by most scholars, particularly as a missing link between the classic era of Woody Guthrie and the modern singer-songwriter genre populated by Bob Dylan and Joan Baez.

Gibson and Camp would split within two years, and after recording some albums as a solo artist and a brief stint with Chicago's famed Second City improvisational comedy troupe, Camp struck out on his own to work as an actor in Los Angeles. His changed his name to Hamilton from Bob, and despite his lack of vertical presence (he stood only 5-foot-2), his boundless energy and quick wit made him handy to guest star in a string of familiar sitcoms of the late '60s: The Monkees, Bewitched, and Love, American Style. By the '70s there was no stopping him as he appeared on virtually every popular comedy of the day: The Mary Tyler Moore Show, M*A*S*H, Laverne & Shirley, Three's Company, and WKRP in Cincinnati.

Eventually, Camp's film roles improved too, and he did his best film work in the latter stages of his career: Blake Edward's undisciplined but still funny S.O.B. (1981); Paul Bartel's glorious cult comedy Eating Raoul (1982); and Clint Eastwood's jazz biopic on Charlie Parker Bird (1988). Among his recent work was a guest spot last season as a carpenter on Desperate Housewives, and his recent completion of a Las Vegas based comedy Hard Four which is currently in post-production. Camp is survived by six children and thirteen grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Hamilton Camp (1934-2005)

Hamilton Camp (1934-2005)

Hamilton Camp, the diminutive yet effervescent actor and singer-songwriter, who spent nearly his entire life in show business, including several appearances in both television and films, died of a heart attack on October 2 at his Los Angeles home. He was 70. He was born October 30, 1934, in London, England. After World War II, he moved to Canada and then to Long Beach with his mother and sister, where the siblings performed in USO shows. In 1946, he made his first movie, Bedlam starring Boris Karloff as an extra (as Bobby Camp) and continued in that vein until he played Thorpe, one of Dean Stockwell's classmates in Kim (1950). After Kim he received some more slightly prominent parts in films: a messenger boy in Titanic (1953); and a mailroom attendant in Executive Suite (1954), but overall, Camp was never a steadily working child actor. Camp relocated to Chicago in the late '50s and rediscovered his childhood passion - music. He began playing in small clubs around the Chicago area, and he struck oil when he partnered with a New York based folk artist, Bob Gibson in 1961. The pair worked in clubs all over the midwest and they soon became known for their tight vocal harmonies and Gibson's 12-string guitar style. Late in 1961, they recorded an album - Gibson and Camp at the Gate of Horn, the Gate of Horn being the most renowned music venue in Chicago for the burgeoning folk scene. The record may have aged a bit over the years, but it is admired as an important progress in folk music by most scholars, particularly as a missing link between the classic era of Woody Guthrie and the modern singer-songwriter genre populated by Bob Dylan and Joan Baez. Gibson and Camp would split within two years, and after recording some albums as a solo artist and a brief stint with Chicago's famed Second City improvisational comedy troupe, Camp struck out on his own to work as an actor in Los Angeles. His changed his name to Hamilton from Bob, and despite his lack of vertical presence (he stood only 5-foot-2), his boundless energy and quick wit made him handy to guest star in a string of familiar sitcoms of the late '60s: The Monkees, Bewitched, and Love, American Style. By the '70s there was no stopping him as he appeared on virtually every popular comedy of the day: The Mary Tyler Moore Show, M*A*S*H, Laverne & Shirley, Three's Company, and WKRP in Cincinnati. Eventually, Camp's film roles improved too, and he did his best film work in the latter stages of his career: Blake Edward's undisciplined but still funny S.O.B. (1981); Paul Bartel's glorious cult comedy Eating Raoul (1982); and Clint Eastwood's jazz biopic on Charlie Parker Bird (1988). Among his recent work was a guest spot last season as a carpenter on Desperate Housewives, and his recent completion of a Las Vegas based comedy Hard Four which is currently in post-production. Camp is survived by six children and thirteen grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Keene Curtis (1923-2002)


Keene Curtis, a veteran Broadway, television and film actor who was familiar to many viewers the snippy upstairs restaurant owner John Allen Hill for the final three seasons of Cheers, died on October 13th of complications of Alzheimer's disease at a retirement center in Bountiful, Utah. He was 79. Born in Salt Lake City in 1923, Curtis grew up in Bountiful, in a family that adored theater. His father built his young son a miniature stage out of an old chiffonier, using a towel for a curtain. Curtis soon began to make his own little theaters out of cardboard boxes and put on shows for the neighborhood kids. No doubt of his calling, Curtis went on to receive his bachelor's and master's degrees in Theater Arts from the University of Utah, where he was a student actor and cheerleader. He had returned to college after spending three years in the Navy, and made his film debut when Orson Welles discovered him for his production of Macbeth (1948) and cast him in the role of Lennox, and launching his career. Despite the promising film debut, Curtis dedicated himself to the stage for the next twenty years, but it was not until he won a Tony Award in 1971 as best featured actor in a musical for The Rothschilds did his profile rise. After his stint as Daddy Warbucks in the Broadway production of Annie Curtis began to venture into television and films, where his baldpate and rich diction enlivened many programs, particularly in comedies where he made a superb comic foil. In addition to his role on Cheers, Curtis’ other television credits include: MASH Ally McBeal, The Drew Carey Show and Caroline in the City. Among Curtis’ most notable films: Heaven Can Wait (1978) The Buddy System (1984), Sliver (1993) and Fred Schepisi’s I.Q. (1994) where Curtis turned in a charming cameo as President Dwight Eisenhower. In 1998, Curtis endowed a scholarship at the University of Utah to help graduates of the school's Actor Training Program launch their careers. He also donated to the university his Tony Award and 48 boxes of theater memorabilia and personal papers, including a 1961 letter from Noel Coward, who praised Curtis' "firmness, patience, efficiency and most of all your ability to handle people with tact and imagination." He is survived by his sister-in-law, nieces and nephews. Michael T. Toole

Keene Curtis (1923-2002)

Keene Curtis, a veteran Broadway, television and film actor who was familiar to many viewers the snippy upstairs restaurant owner John Allen Hill for the final three seasons of Cheers, died on October 13th of complications of Alzheimer's disease at a retirement center in Bountiful, Utah. He was 79. Born in Salt Lake City in 1923, Curtis grew up in Bountiful, in a family that adored theater. His father built his young son a miniature stage out of an old chiffonier, using a towel for a curtain. Curtis soon began to make his own little theaters out of cardboard boxes and put on shows for the neighborhood kids. No doubt of his calling, Curtis went on to receive his bachelor's and master's degrees in Theater Arts from the University of Utah, where he was a student actor and cheerleader. He had returned to college after spending three years in the Navy, and made his film debut when Orson Welles discovered him for his production of Macbeth (1948) and cast him in the role of Lennox, and launching his career. Despite the promising film debut, Curtis dedicated himself to the stage for the next twenty years, but it was not until he won a Tony Award in 1971 as best featured actor in a musical for The Rothschilds did his profile rise. After his stint as Daddy Warbucks in the Broadway production of Annie Curtis began to venture into television and films, where his baldpate and rich diction enlivened many programs, particularly in comedies where he made a superb comic foil. In addition to his role on Cheers, Curtis’ other television credits include: MASH Ally McBeal, The Drew Carey Show and Caroline in the City. Among Curtis’ most notable films: Heaven Can Wait (1978) The Buddy System (1984), Sliver (1993) and Fred Schepisi’s I.Q. (1994) where Curtis turned in a charming cameo as President Dwight Eisenhower. In 1998, Curtis endowed a scholarship at the University of Utah to help graduates of the school's Actor Training Program launch their careers. He also donated to the university his Tony Award and 48 boxes of theater memorabilia and personal papers, including a 1961 letter from Noel Coward, who praised Curtis' "firmness, patience, efficiency and most of all your ability to handle people with tact and imagination." He is survived by his sister-in-law, nieces and nephews. Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States March 1978

Released in United States Winter January 1, 1978

Completed production April 1978.

Released in United States Winter January 1, 1978

Released in United States March 1978