The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring


2h 58m 2001
The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

Brief Synopsis

The wizard Gandalf enlists a hobbit and a team of adventurers to protect the One Ring from the evil Sauron.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Action
Adventure
Fantasy
Adaptation
Release Date
Dec 19, 2001
Premiere Information
World premiere in London: 10 Dec 2001; U.S. opening: 19 Dec 2001
Production Company
New Line Cinema; Wingnut Films
Distribution Company
New Line Cinema
Country
New Zealand and United States
Location
New Zealand; Matamata, New Zealand; Queenstown, New Zealand; Wellington, New Zealand; Tongariro, New Zealand; Abel Tasman National Park,New Zealand; Camperdown Studios, Wellington, New Zealand; Fort Dorset,New Zealand; Hutt Valley,New Zealand; Matamata,New Zealand; Queenstown,New Zealand; Te Anau,New Zealand; Tongariro,New Zealand; Wellington--Camperdown Studios, North Island, New Zealand; Wellington--Hutt Valley,New Zealand; South Island, New Zealand; New Zealand; New Zealand; Matamata, New Zealand
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel The Fellowship of the Ring: Being the First Part of "The Lord of the Rings" by J. R. R. Tolkien (London, 1954).

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 58m

Synopsis

In the mythical world of Middle-earth, many thousands of years ago, several powerful rings were made and given to the heads of each state: three rings for the Elven-kings, seven for the Dwarf-lords and nine for Mortal Men. Unknown to them, however, the Dark Lord Sauron had secretly forged an additional ring, a master containing the power to rule the others, and for many years, enslaved the inhabitants of Middle-earth, using armies of disfigured creatures called Orcs to carry out his aggressive campaigns. Eventually, an alliance of Elves and Men drove the Orcs back into Sauron's territory, called Mordor. At the base of Mount Doom, where the master ring was forged, Sauron joined the battle and slayed the Human king Elendil, but was then attacked by Elendil's son, Isildur, who cut the ring from Sauron's hand. Without it, Sauron's physical body crumbled and his power scattered. The Elf lord Elrond begged Isildur to destroy the ring by casting it into the fires of Mount Doom, but the ring, having a life of its own, enticed Isildur to keep it for himself. Later, Isildur was killed by Orcs when the ring, which grants invisibility to the wearer, slipped from his finger. The ring rested at the bottom of a river until found by the Hobbit-like creature Gollum, and over many years, the corruption in the ring disfigured Gollum's mind and body. Then Bilbo Baggins, from a race of three-and-a-half-foot tall creatures called Hobbits, encountered Gollum, gained possession of the ring and returned with it to his home in the Shire. Since that time, because of the ring's power, Bilbo has not appeared to age, although he is now celebrating his 111th birthday. During a celebration held in his honor by neighbors, Bilbo confesses to his old friend, the wizard Gandalf, that he is weary and plans to leave the Shire, never to return. Although he is bequeathing his house and belongings to his younger cousin and heir, Frodo Baggins, Bilbo struggles within himself over leaving the ring. Reluctantly, Bilbo departs without it, but Gandalf is disturbed by the power the ring seems to have. Later, after studying old manuscripts, Gandalf shows Frodo markings on the ring identifying it as Sauron's and warns him that Sauron's life-force is rebuilding a new army to conquer Middle-earth. After convincing Frodo of the danger of keeping the ring, which will lure Sauron to the Shire, he enlists Frodo's eavesdropping fellow Hobbit, Samwise "Sam" Gamgee, to help Frodo take the ring to the House of Elrond, in the Elf city of Rivendell. After giving instructions to meet him at an inn in a neighboring village, and warning Frodo to change his name and not wear the ring, Gandalf sends the Hobbits off. He then seeks counsel with the head of his order, the wizard Saruman, who resides in the tower of Isengard, but finds that the old wizard has been corrupted. Saruman asks Gandalf to join him on the dark side with Sauron, but when Gandalf refuses, Saruman tortures and imprisons him on top of the tower. At Sauron's command, Saruman has his enslaved Orcs cut down all the old trees in the forest to stoke a forge to build an army of Urak-Hais, a stronger race of creatures bred by crossing Orcs with Goblins. Meanwhile, Frodo and Sam, joined by two Hobbit friends, Meriadoc "Merry" Brandybuck and Peregrin "Pippin" Took, escape black riders called Ringwraiths, Sauron's enslaved half-living beings who are drawn toward the ring. At the inn, while awaiting Gandalf, Frodo draws attention to himself by putting on the ring and disappearing, thus betraying his location to Sauron. A mysterious Human, Strider, then warns them that they are in danger and cannot wait for Gandalf. He leads them toward Rivendell, but en route, Frodo is injured in an attack by the Ringwraiths. With the help of Elrond's daughter Arwen, who loves Strider enough to give up her Elven immortality, Frodo is rushed to Rivendell and healed by Elven medicine. When Frodo recuperates, he is reunited with both Gandalf, who escaped Saruman's imprisonment, and Bilbo, whose body has aged without the ring's magic. Frodo also learns that Strider is really Aragorn, a descendant of Isildur who was reared by Elves and has abdicated his throne for fear of failing his race, as Isildur did when he became entranced by the ring. Elrond calls a meeting of Elves, Humans, Hobbits and Dwarves to decide the fate of the ring. Although the council agrees that it must be destroyed in the fires of Mount Doom, individuals, enchanted by the evil in the ring, quarrel over how to accomplish the deed. Frodo, although he does not know the way to Mordor, volunteers to be the ringbearer and take the ring to Mount Doom. Moved by Frodo's courage, Aragorn and Boromir, a Human warrior whose father is steward of the city of Aragorn's ancestors, offer to guard him on his journey. Gandalf, the Elf Legolas, the Dwarf Gimli and Sam, Merry and Pippin also give their services to Frodo. The nine companions, whom Elrond dubs the Fellowship of the Ring, set off on their mission. Although a mountain pass seems the safest route to Mordor, blizzard, avalanches and other hardships, all caused by the magic of Saruman, who watches their journey through his Seeing Stone, impede their progress. They enter the Dwarf Mines of Moria and discover that the civilization there has been destroyed. Trapped inside the mine by a water creature known as "The Watcher," the group passes through the labyrinths of the mines, pursued by Gollum, Goblins and a Cave Troll. In one of the battles, Frodo narrowly escapes death, but is saved by a magic vest he is wearing, a gift from Bilbo. Across a collapsing stone stairway built over a bottomless chasm, a huge fiery creature called a Balrog pursues the group. While giving his companions time to escape, Gandalf tries to stand down the demon, but as it falls into the chasm, it snares Gandalf with its tentacles and pulls him in. Exhausted and grieving for Gandalf, the Fellowship continues, out of the mines and into a forestland, Lothlorien, which is occupied by the powerful Elf queen Galadriel and her court. While the group rests, Galadriel shows Frodo, who is fearing the futility of his quest, the consequences of his failure and encourages him to believe that even the smallest person can change the course of the future. After continuing on their mission by boat, the Fellowship pauses across the river from Mordor, planning to enter it at night. As the others make camp, Boromir accosts Frodo in the woods. By putting on the ring and becoming invisible, Frodo escapes Boromir, whom he knows is enchanted by the ring, and while in that state, sees the eye of Sauron looking for the ring and Sauron's armies preparing for war. After removing the ring, Frodo convinces Aragorn that it corrupts those who are near it, even his trusted companions, and that he must continue the journey alone. At Isengard, after completing the creation of the Urak-Hai army, Saruman demands their loyalty to him, rather than Sauron, and sends them out in search of Frodo and the ring, so that he can become Lord of the Rings and conquer Middle-earth. The Uraks catch up with the Fellowship as Frodo is leaving and attack the group. Pippin and Merry, whom the Uraks mistake for the ringbearer, are abducted while luring the creatures away from Frodo, and Boromir, who has recovered from the ring's enchantment, tries to stop them, but is fatally wounded. The remainder of the Fellowship fights valiantly, until the Uraks leave. The dying Boromir then grieves that he has failed the Humans, and when Aragorn, inspired by Boromir, swears to him that he will protect their people, Boromir calls him "king" with his last breath. Gimli laments that all was in vain and that their Fellowship has failed, but Aragorn says, "not if we hold true to each other," and leads his companions in pursuit of the captors of Merry and Pippin. Meanwhile, Sam sees his friend rowing alone toward Mordor. Remembering his promise to Gandalf to stay with Frodo, Sam, who cannot swim, follows him into the river, forcing Frodo to rescue him. Later, in Mordor, Frodo admits that he is glad of Sam's company, but hopes that his other companions have a safer journey.

Crew

Tim Abbot

Props maker

Gudrun Abbott

Armour weapons/Standby, Weta Workshop

Jane Abbott

Riding double

Janine Abery

Assistant to Barrie M. Osborne

Michael Abott

Armour weapons/Standby, Weta Workshop

Gino Acevedo

Prosthetics Supervisor, Weta Workshop

Holly Acton

2D colourist, Weta Digital

Karen Adcock

Prosthetics makeup, Weta Workshop

Richard Addison-wood

Software dev Supervisor, Weta Digital

Daniel Aird

Sculptor

Christopher Aitken

Painter

Matt Aitken

Digital models Supervisor, Weta Digital

Sean Allan

Double & stand-in

Stephen Allanson

Clapper loader, Miniatures unit

Greg Allen

Mocap Supervisor, Weta Digital

Jacqui Allen

Assistant art Director

Jonathan Allen

Addl Music crew

Nancy Allen

Music Editor

Ruben Allen

PA/Runner

Judy Alley

Set Dresser

Tristan 'stan' Alley

Standby Assistant

Greg Allison

Armour weapons/Standby, Weta Workshop

Jon Allitt

Senior massive crowd TD, Weta Digital

Colin Alway

Compositor, Weta Digital

Bob Anderson

Swordmaster

Dave Anderson

Lighting tech

Erica Anderson

Armour weapons/Standby, Weta Workshop

John Anderson

Shader wrt, Weta Digital

Lauren Anderson

PA/Runner

Tony Anderson

Visual Effects Director of Photographer, Digital Domain

Catherine Anderton

Wardrobe on-set

Malcolm Angell

On-set survey tech, Weta Digital

Bernd Angerer

Character anim, Digital Domain

Animal Logic Film

Addl visual Effects

Karl Anton

Carpenter

Jamie Applegate

Lighting tech, Miniatures unit

Matt Appleton

Armour weapons/Standby, Weta Workshop

Elisabeth Arko

3D TD, Weta Digital

Kayne Asher

Grip

Kyle Ashley

Motion Editor, Weta Digital

Marc Ashton

2d Assistant Director

Mike Asquith

Designer/Sculptor, Weta Workshop

Rebecca Asquith

Miniature builder, Weta Workshop

Margaret Aston

Makeup & hair

Andrew Ayrton

Lighting tech

Elena Azuola

Financial controller

Rick Baer

Accountant

Andrew Baguley

Sculptor

Polly Baigent

Double & stand-in

Michael Baker

Hammerhand

Sala Baker

Stunts

Felix Balbas

Creature TD, Weta Digital

Brian Bansgrove

Supervisor chief lighting tech

Jeff Barber

Stunts

Aaron Barclay

Compositor, Animal Logic

Keith Barclay

Armour weapons/Standby, Weta Workshop

Richard Barker

1st Assistant Director, 2d unit

James Barr

Lighting tech, Miniatures unit

Jeremy Barr

Armour weapons/Standby, Weta Workshop

Gordon Barrell

Mechanist/Eng, Weta Workshop

Daniel W. Barringer

Assistant stunt Coordinator

Dave Barson

Armour weapons/Standby, Weta Workshop

Bruce Bartley

Driver

John Baster

Miniature builder, Weta Workshop

Trevor Bau

Stunts

Steve Bayliss

Prod accountant, Weta Digital

Len Baynes

Rider

Clare Beaton

Armour weapons/Standby, Weta Workshop

Warren Beaton

Mechanist/Eng, Weta Workshop

Andrew Beattie

Prosthetics makeup, Weta Workshop

Brett Beattie

Stunts

Steen Bech

Visual Effects Supervisor, Oktobor Films

Kelly Bechtle-woods

3D TD, Weta Digital

Ferenc Bechtold

Programmer

Cory Bedwell

3D seq lead, Weta Digital

Darren Bedwell

Texture painter lead, Weta Digital

Ben Beemsterboer

Props maker

Niccola Sanderson Belcher

Prod Coordinator

Miles Bellas

Texture painter, Weta Digital

Stephen Belsten

Sculptor

Laurent Ben-mimoun

Matte painter, Weta Digital

Kyle Bendall

Digital modeller, Weta Digital

Emma Bendell

Accountant

Gary Bennett

Paint FX, Weta Workshop

Jeremy Bennett

Visual Effects art Director, Weta Workshop

Nicola Benton

Casting Assistant

Jarl Benzon

Double & stand-in

Patrick Bergeron

Compositor, Weta Digital

Tama Berkelkon

Mechanist/Eng, Weta Workshop

Nancy Bernstein

Visual Effects Executive prod, Digital Domain

Jamie Beswarick

Designer/Sculptor, Weta Workshop

Hannah Bianchini

Prod Manager, Weta Workshop

Ed Biasi

Creatures/Prosthetics, Weta Workshop

Megan Bint

Hair, Weta Workshop

Nicola Birchfield

Travel & accommodation Coordinator

Andrew Black

Optometrist

Freya Blackwood

Creatures/Prosthetics, Weta Workshop

'peter' Joe Bleakley

Art Director

Brett Blenkin

Const foreman

Jan Blenkin

Assistant to Peter Jackson

Nigel Bluck

Director of Photographer, 2d unit

Richard Bluck

Director of Photographer, 2d unit

Philippa Bluett

Double & stand-in

Morgan Boehringer

Armour weapons/Standby, Weta Workshop

Alun Bollinger

Director of Photographer, 2d unit

Roger Bolton

Compositor, Weta Digital

Shaun Bolton

Designer/Sculptor, Weta Workshop

Michael Bonnar

Rock & foam

Dave Booth

Physical Effects tech

Melissa Booth

Assistant Publicist

Nick Booth

Senior pre-pro Coordinator, Weta Digital

Bridget Bourke

Prod Manager, 2d unit

Lesley Bourkes-harding

Armour weapons/Standby, Weta Workshop

Naomi Bowden

Seq Coordinator, Weta Digital

Jon Bowen

Compositor, Weta Digital

Lucy Bowey

Video Assistant

Chantelle Bowkett

Wardrobe on-set

Cindy Bowles

Assistant Editor

Philippa Boyens

Screenwriter

Christopher Boyes

Re-rec mix

Kevin Bradshaw

Props maker

Lee Bramwell

Camera TD, Weta Digital

Matt Brebner

Armour weapons/Standby, Weta Workshop

Jacob Bridge

Lighting tech

John Brien

Carpenter

Simon Bright

Standby props

Ben Britton

Prod eng, Weta Digital

Carola Brockoff

Creatures/Prosthetics, Weta Workshop

Paul Broucek

Executive in charge of Music

Jonathon Brough

Paint FX, Weta Workshop

Angela Brown

Armour weapons/Standby, Weta Workshop

Chris Brown

On-set survey tech, Weta Digital

David Brown

Chief lighting tech

Duncan Brown

Armour weapons/Standby, Weta Workshop

Ian Brown

3D anim, Animal Logic

Sam Brown

Hammerhand

Samantha Brown

Wardrobe manufacturing

Jason Browning

Carpenter

Jim Bruening

Addl Music crew

David Brunette

Rotoscope artist, Weta Digital

Craig Bryant

Rigging

Julian Bryant

2D seq lead, Weta Digital

Michele Bryant

Armour weapons/Standby, Weta

James Bryson

Model tech, Miniatures unit

Tanya Buchanan

Producer's Assistant

Bob Buck

Extras Coordinator

Andy Buckley R.n.

Safety/Medics

Stephen Buckley

Senior anim, Weta Digital

Jörg W. Bungert

Lead digital colourist

Delphine Buratti

FX anim, Weta Digital

Lyndon Burford

Armour weapons/Standby, Weta Workshop

Brent Burge

Sound Effects Editor

Clare Burgess

3D Coordinator, Weta Digital

Rob Burns

Creatures/Prosthetics, Weta Workshop

Jacq Burrell

Prod Assistant, Weta Workshop

Victoria Burrows

U.S. casting

Elaine Burt

Prod Coordinator

Nigel Burton

Clapper loader, Miniatures unit

Greg Butler

3D seq lead, Weta Digital

Julian Butler

3D TD, Weta Digital

Steve Butler

Safety/Medics

Pete Butters

Props maker

Anton Buys

Leading hand

Andrew Calder

Senior anim, Weta Digital

Andy Calder

Payroll

John Caldwell

Armour weapons/Standby, Weta Workshop

Jim Callahan

FX software developer, Weta Digital

Sonia Calvert

Compositor, Weta Digital

Brian Campbell

Painter

Grant Campbell

Lab liaison

Guy Campbell

Key 2d Assistant Director

Malcolm Campbell

Unit Manager, Miniatures unit

William Campbell

Assistant Editor

Paul Campion

Texture painter, Weta Digital

Kiki Candela

3D seq lead, Weta Digital

Jason Canovas

Dial Editor

Alice Capper-starr

Coordinator

Paula Carswell

Standby greens

Glyn Carter

Armour weapons/Standby, Weta Workshop

Justin B. Carter

Stunts

Róisín Carty

Dialect coach

Paul Carvell

Carpenter

Tim Castelow

Armour weapons/Standby, Weta Workshop

Norman Cates

Creatures/Prosthetics, Weta Workshop

Bradford De Caussin

Digital modeller, Weta Digital

John Cavill

Director of Photographer, 2d unit

Sourisak Chanpaseuth

Paint FX, Weta Workshop

Praphaphorn 'fon' Chansantor

Double & stand-in

Tanea Chapman

Set Dresser

Paul Charisse

Massive crowd TD, Weta Digital

Colin Chase

Chief lighting tech

Jimmy Chatfield

Rider

Karl Chisholm

Physical Effects on-set Coordinator

Frank Christensen

Lighting tech

Glen Christie

Digital modeller, Weta Digital

Basil Clapham

Riding double

Jeff Clark

Hammerhand

Adam Clarke

Focus puller

Hannah Clarke

On-set survey tech, Weta Digital

Peter Clarke

Unit, Miniatures unit

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Action
Adventure
Fantasy
Adaptation
Release Date
Dec 19, 2001
Premiere Information
World premiere in London: 10 Dec 2001; U.S. opening: 19 Dec 2001
Production Company
New Line Cinema; Wingnut Films
Distribution Company
New Line Cinema
Country
New Zealand and United States
Location
New Zealand; Matamata, New Zealand; Queenstown, New Zealand; Wellington, New Zealand; Tongariro, New Zealand; Abel Tasman National Park,New Zealand; Camperdown Studios, Wellington, New Zealand; Fort Dorset,New Zealand; Hutt Valley,New Zealand; Matamata,New Zealand; Queenstown,New Zealand; Te Anau,New Zealand; Tongariro,New Zealand; Wellington--Camperdown Studios, North Island, New Zealand; Wellington--Hutt Valley,New Zealand; South Island, New Zealand; New Zealand; New Zealand; Matamata, New Zealand
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel The Fellowship of the Ring: Being the First Part of "The Lord of the Rings" by J. R. R. Tolkien (London, 1954).

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 58m

Award Wins

Best Cinematography

2001

Best Cinematography

2002
Andrew Lesnie

Best Makeup

2001

Best Score

2001

Best Visual Effects

2001

Best Visual Effects

2002
Randall William Cook

Best Visual Effects

2002
Mark Stetson

Best Visual Effects

2002
Jim Rygiel

Best Visual Effects

2002
Richard F. Taylor

Award Nominations

Best Adapted Screenplay

2001

Set Decoration

2001

Best Costume Design

2001

Best Director

2001
Peter Jackson

Best Editing

2001

Best Picture

2001

Best Song

2001

Best Sound

2001

Best Supporting Actor

2001

Articles

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring


Legend has it that Oxford professor John Ronald Ruel Tolkein was grading examination papers one day in the early 1930s at Pembroke College when he scribbled absently on a blank page "In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit." A veteran of World War I and a former employee of the Oxford English Dictionary (where he had been tasked with hunting down the Germanic origins of words beginning with the letter "w"), Tolkein would channel his fascination with Norse and Finnish mythology, philology, Germanic literature, historic fiction, William Shakespeare, Charles Dickens, George MacDonald, and such "hollow earth" adventures as H. Rider Haggard's She and Jules Verne's Journey to the Center of the Earth into his 1937 children's novel The Hobbit. Wildly successful upon its publication, the book - the story of a quest and war in the time between the dawn of fairies and the dominion of mankind - inspired Tolkein's publishers to demand a follow-up, further adventures for his denizens of "Middle Earth." Committed to his full-time academic vocation, Tolkein consented but warned publishers George Allen and Unwin that his progress would be slow. It took J. R. R. Tolkein twelve years to complete The Lord of the Rings, a massive work of epic high fantasy, a mythopoeia that surpassed the imaginative other worlds of Edgar Rice Burroughs and Robert E. Howard. Though Tolkein had conceived of The Lord of the Rings as a self-contained work, his publishers divided the lengthy tome into three parts, to be published sequentially between 1954 and 1955; during that period, the author aged from 45 years to 63.

Various attempts to adapt The Lord of the Rings for cinema were broached over the ensuing years, both leading up to and past Tolkein's death in 1973. At one point, the Beatles hoped to divert some of their shared fortunes into a film adaptation, ideally with Stanley Kubrick at the helm, but Tolkein was disinterred in what the Fab Four might do to his narrative. Few filmmakers who considered taking on such a project were fooled into thinking mounting Tolkein's tale would be an easy thing but John Boorman (having dabbled in fantasy with his Wizard of Oz-inspired Zardoz) declared that he would make an attempt and bring it in under one hundred minutes. When Boorman's plans fell through, animator Ralph Bakshi (whose 1977 feature Wizards was influenced by the Middle Earth books) struck a deal with Tolkein's daughter to bring her father's trilogy to the big screen in animated form. Bakshi's The Lord of the Rings (1978) combined the first two books -- The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers -- into a single feature, with plans to handle The Return of the King as a sequel. Clocking in at two hours and twelve minutes, The Lord of the Rings was the first fully rotoscoped animated feature, shot live with actors in Spain, and augmented with cell painting to strike an eerie balance between traditional animation and live action. (Among Bakshi's crew of young animators was a young, uncredited Tim Burton.) Though the $4 million feature grossed over $30 million, Bakshi's sequel never materialized.

Bakshi's The Lord of the Rings exerted great influence. An adaptation of The Hobbit, made for television via conventional animation by Arthur Rankin and Jules Bass, had beat The Lord of the Rings to the public in 1977; it was followed by a small screen cartoon adaptation of The Return of the King (1980), again courtesy of Rankin-Bass. Among the legion of fantasy fans inspired by the Bakshi feature was a young New Zealander named Peter Jackson, a self-professed film fanatic who had completed his first feature, Bad Taste (1987), at age 22. Interested in remaking the original King Kong (1933) with state of the art computer-generated animation, Jackson saw the project put on hold at Universal due to the pending release of two big budget/big monster remakes, Joe Johnson's Mighty Joe Young and Roland Emmerich's Godzilla (both released in 1998). In his frustration, Jackson renewed his interest in the Tolkein saga and won production rights from producer Saul Zaentz, who had backed the Bakshi film. Striking a deal with Disney-owned Miramax, Jackson began laboring over the adaptation, with the agreement being that two films would be necessary to tell the tale properly. Jackson and partner Fran Walsh produced a 90 page treatment, which was adapted by the team with screenwriter Philippa Boyens. As location scouting began in New Zealand, Miramax grew wary of a budget that promised to rise in excess of $150 million (with $15 million having already been spent in pre-production) and suggested that Jackson consider blending the whole of the Tolkein saga into one film. Jackson refused and Miramax granted him permission to shop his scripts elsewhere.

Executives at New Line Cinema were much more receptive to the idea of a sprawling adaptation that would give The Lord of the Rings its proper due and went the extra mile of suggesting to Jackson that he make three films instead of two. After a lengthy period of pre-production, principal photography for The Lord of the Rings began in October 1999, with the plan being to complete the trilogy as one complete project but to release it in three parts. Casting ideas and options for The Fellowship of the Rings (2001) ran the gamut from the inspired (Sean Connery as the wizard Gandalf, David Bowie as the half-elf Elrond) to the quizzical (Vin Diesel as the mighty Aragorn, a role turned down by Daniel Day-Lewis, Nicolas Cage, and Russell Crowe). Interested less in star wattage than in fitting the right actor to the right role, Jackson settled on a mix of veteran (but hardly superstar) performers (Ian McKellen as Gandalf, Viggo Mortensen as Aragorn, Sean Bean as the tragic and penitent Boromir) and newcomers (principally American actor Elijah Wood as hobbit protagonist Bilbo Baggins) and Orlando Bloom (soon to emerge as a star in his own right in Disney's Pirates of the Caribbean franchise). Support casting was no less inspired, with Cate Blanchett retained to play the elf Galadriel and former Hammer horror star Christopher Lee (an authority on Tolkein, who acted as a technical advisor) offered the pivotal role of the evil Saruman, the lord of The Lord of the Rings, whose dastardly actions have set, at the top of The Fellowship of the Ring, the trilogy in motion.

Shooting The Lord of the Rings would last for eighteen months, most of it spent on location in New Zealand's never-filmed conservation areas and national parks, where Jackson felt certain he could achieve his aesthetic goal of "Ray Harryhausen meets David Lean." (Jackson and his crew also went through more than a thousand miles of film to complete the entire trilogy.) Given the breadth and scope of the production, casualties were relative few and minor. Christopher Lee broke his hand during filming while Viggo Mortensen fractured two toes while shooting repeated takes of one scene and suffered facial bruising while surfing off the New Zealand coast during his down-time. Liv Tyler, as the Elf princess Arwen, stabbed herself in the right thigh on camera while Sean Astin (cast as Bilbo's amanuensis Samwise Gamgee) impaled his foot on a shard of glass while wading into Mavora Lakes (substituting for Tolkein's Nen Hithoel). Some painful blunders even made it into the finished film, perhaps none more indelibly than Gandalf's painful encounter with a low-hanging ceiling beam; actor Ian McKellen misjudged his angle of passage under the beam and conked his head but his ability to act through and use the pain for the purpose of the scene so impressed Jackson that he left the moment intact. Shooting The Fellowship of the Ring proved to be such a bonding experience for Wood, McKellen, Mortenson, Astin, Bean and their castmates who comprised the filmic fellowship that eight of the nine had the elfish character for "nine" tattooed somewhere on their bodies; actor John Rhys-Davies (as the fellowship's token dwarf, Gimli), demurred but offered up his stunt double in his place.

By Richard Harland Smith

¬Sources:

Peter Jackson: A Filmmaker's Journey by Brian Sibley (Harper Collins, 2006)
The Lord of the Rings: The Making of the Movie Trilogy by Brian Sibley (Houghton-Mifflin, Harcourt, 2002)
Lord of Misrule: The Autobiography of Christopher Lee by Christopher Lee (Orion, 2004)
"Kingdom Come: Graham Fuller Hails Peter Jackson's Monumental Tolkein Triptych" by Graham Fuller, Film Comment, Jan/Feb 2005
The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

Legend has it that Oxford professor John Ronald Ruel Tolkein was grading examination papers one day in the early 1930s at Pembroke College when he scribbled absently on a blank page "In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit." A veteran of World War I and a former employee of the Oxford English Dictionary (where he had been tasked with hunting down the Germanic origins of words beginning with the letter "w"), Tolkein would channel his fascination with Norse and Finnish mythology, philology, Germanic literature, historic fiction, William Shakespeare, Charles Dickens, George MacDonald, and such "hollow earth" adventures as H. Rider Haggard's She and Jules Verne's Journey to the Center of the Earth into his 1937 children's novel The Hobbit. Wildly successful upon its publication, the book - the story of a quest and war in the time between the dawn of fairies and the dominion of mankind - inspired Tolkein's publishers to demand a follow-up, further adventures for his denizens of "Middle Earth." Committed to his full-time academic vocation, Tolkein consented but warned publishers George Allen and Unwin that his progress would be slow. It took J. R. R. Tolkein twelve years to complete The Lord of the Rings, a massive work of epic high fantasy, a mythopoeia that surpassed the imaginative other worlds of Edgar Rice Burroughs and Robert E. Howard. Though Tolkein had conceived of The Lord of the Rings as a self-contained work, his publishers divided the lengthy tome into three parts, to be published sequentially between 1954 and 1955; during that period, the author aged from 45 years to 63. Various attempts to adapt The Lord of the Rings for cinema were broached over the ensuing years, both leading up to and past Tolkein's death in 1973. At one point, the Beatles hoped to divert some of their shared fortunes into a film adaptation, ideally with Stanley Kubrick at the helm, but Tolkein was disinterred in what the Fab Four might do to his narrative. Few filmmakers who considered taking on such a project were fooled into thinking mounting Tolkein's tale would be an easy thing but John Boorman (having dabbled in fantasy with his Wizard of Oz-inspired Zardoz) declared that he would make an attempt and bring it in under one hundred minutes. When Boorman's plans fell through, animator Ralph Bakshi (whose 1977 feature Wizards was influenced by the Middle Earth books) struck a deal with Tolkein's daughter to bring her father's trilogy to the big screen in animated form. Bakshi's The Lord of the Rings (1978) combined the first two books -- The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers -- into a single feature, with plans to handle The Return of the King as a sequel. Clocking in at two hours and twelve minutes, The Lord of the Rings was the first fully rotoscoped animated feature, shot live with actors in Spain, and augmented with cell painting to strike an eerie balance between traditional animation and live action. (Among Bakshi's crew of young animators was a young, uncredited Tim Burton.) Though the $4 million feature grossed over $30 million, Bakshi's sequel never materialized. Bakshi's The Lord of the Rings exerted great influence. An adaptation of The Hobbit, made for television via conventional animation by Arthur Rankin and Jules Bass, had beat The Lord of the Rings to the public in 1977; it was followed by a small screen cartoon adaptation of The Return of the King (1980), again courtesy of Rankin-Bass. Among the legion of fantasy fans inspired by the Bakshi feature was a young New Zealander named Peter Jackson, a self-professed film fanatic who had completed his first feature, Bad Taste (1987), at age 22. Interested in remaking the original King Kong (1933) with state of the art computer-generated animation, Jackson saw the project put on hold at Universal due to the pending release of two big budget/big monster remakes, Joe Johnson's Mighty Joe Young and Roland Emmerich's Godzilla (both released in 1998). In his frustration, Jackson renewed his interest in the Tolkein saga and won production rights from producer Saul Zaentz, who had backed the Bakshi film. Striking a deal with Disney-owned Miramax, Jackson began laboring over the adaptation, with the agreement being that two films would be necessary to tell the tale properly. Jackson and partner Fran Walsh produced a 90 page treatment, which was adapted by the team with screenwriter Philippa Boyens. As location scouting began in New Zealand, Miramax grew wary of a budget that promised to rise in excess of $150 million (with $15 million having already been spent in pre-production) and suggested that Jackson consider blending the whole of the Tolkein saga into one film. Jackson refused and Miramax granted him permission to shop his scripts elsewhere. Executives at New Line Cinema were much more receptive to the idea of a sprawling adaptation that would give The Lord of the Rings its proper due and went the extra mile of suggesting to Jackson that he make three films instead of two. After a lengthy period of pre-production, principal photography for The Lord of the Rings began in October 1999, with the plan being to complete the trilogy as one complete project but to release it in three parts. Casting ideas and options for The Fellowship of the Rings (2001) ran the gamut from the inspired (Sean Connery as the wizard Gandalf, David Bowie as the half-elf Elrond) to the quizzical (Vin Diesel as the mighty Aragorn, a role turned down by Daniel Day-Lewis, Nicolas Cage, and Russell Crowe). Interested less in star wattage than in fitting the right actor to the right role, Jackson settled on a mix of veteran (but hardly superstar) performers (Ian McKellen as Gandalf, Viggo Mortensen as Aragorn, Sean Bean as the tragic and penitent Boromir) and newcomers (principally American actor Elijah Wood as hobbit protagonist Bilbo Baggins) and Orlando Bloom (soon to emerge as a star in his own right in Disney's Pirates of the Caribbean franchise). Support casting was no less inspired, with Cate Blanchett retained to play the elf Galadriel and former Hammer horror star Christopher Lee (an authority on Tolkein, who acted as a technical advisor) offered the pivotal role of the evil Saruman, the lord of The Lord of the Rings, whose dastardly actions have set, at the top of The Fellowship of the Ring, the trilogy in motion. Shooting The Lord of the Rings would last for eighteen months, most of it spent on location in New Zealand's never-filmed conservation areas and national parks, where Jackson felt certain he could achieve his aesthetic goal of "Ray Harryhausen meets David Lean." (Jackson and his crew also went through more than a thousand miles of film to complete the entire trilogy.) Given the breadth and scope of the production, casualties were relative few and minor. Christopher Lee broke his hand during filming while Viggo Mortensen fractured two toes while shooting repeated takes of one scene and suffered facial bruising while surfing off the New Zealand coast during his down-time. Liv Tyler, as the Elf princess Arwen, stabbed herself in the right thigh on camera while Sean Astin (cast as Bilbo's amanuensis Samwise Gamgee) impaled his foot on a shard of glass while wading into Mavora Lakes (substituting for Tolkein's Nen Hithoel). Some painful blunders even made it into the finished film, perhaps none more indelibly than Gandalf's painful encounter with a low-hanging ceiling beam; actor Ian McKellen misjudged his angle of passage under the beam and conked his head but his ability to act through and use the pain for the purpose of the scene so impressed Jackson that he left the moment intact. Shooting The Fellowship of the Ring proved to be such a bonding experience for Wood, McKellen, Mortenson, Astin, Bean and their castmates who comprised the filmic fellowship that eight of the nine had the elfish character for "nine" tattooed somewhere on their bodies; actor John Rhys-Davies (as the fellowship's token dwarf, Gimli), demurred but offered up his stunt double in his place. By Richard Harland Smith ¬Sources: Peter Jackson: A Filmmaker's Journey by Brian Sibley (Harper Collins, 2006) The Lord of the Rings: The Making of the Movie Trilogy by Brian Sibley (Houghton-Mifflin, Harcourt, 2002) Lord of Misrule: The Autobiography of Christopher Lee by Christopher Lee (Orion, 2004) "Kingdom Come: Graham Fuller Hails Peter Jackson's Monumental Tolkein Triptych" by Graham Fuller, Film Comment, Jan/Feb 2005

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The Fellowship of the Ring is the first episode in the film trilogy of J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings. The three episodes were shot simultaneously and were released in consecutive Decembers, from 2001 through 2003.
       Beginning with the appearance of the series title, The Lord of the Rings," and continuing over a film montage, voice-over narration by Cate Blanchett as "Galadriel" is heard for approximately eight minutes in a prologue explaining the history of the ring. Then the title of the first film The Fellowship of the Ring appears onscreen, followed by the words: "The shire-60 years later." There are no opening cast or crew credits. Some of the cast are credited twice in the ending credits. In the first appearance, most of the lead performers are credited without a character name, except for "Andy Serkis as Gollum." Later, Alan Howard is credited as "Voice of the Ring," followed by all featured players in alphabetical order. The credit for "Cute Hobbit children" appears as "Billy and Katie Jackson." Ending credits include a list of people and organizations the "Filmmakers" wished to thank, a brief dedication to Joan and Bill Jackson, and an inscription in the Maori language, reading: "He mihi nui hoki ki nga tangata whenua o Aotearoa. Ma Rangi raua ko Papa tatou e manaaki, e taiki hei nga tau e tu mai nei." A brief flashback montage appears during the Rivendell sequence, when "Gandalf" recalls his escape from "Saruman" and when "Elrond" recalls the time when Isildur refused to destroy the ring. Within the film, whenever "Frodo" puts on the ring and when he gazes into Galadriel's water mirror, a series of fast-moving, distorted images appear, depicting his visions. Gandalf, too, has a brief "vision," when he touches the ring in the Shire sequence. Sometimes the facial images of characters who become affected by the ring's evil power are momentarily distorted. "Sauron" is depicted as a giant eye and is heard as an offscreen whisper. Voice-over narration, sometimes as brief as a word or a sentence, is spoken by various characters intermittently throughout the film. Subtitles are used when characters are speaking in Tolkien's Elvish language.
       The world of Middle-Earth, which is central to the film, was created by philologist and World War I veteran John Ronald Reuel Tolkien (1892-1973). It first appeared in his 1937 book, The Hobbit or, There and Back Again. In the film, the book written by the character "Bilbo Baggins," titled There and Back Again, is a reference to that book, which, according to a December 2001 Entertainment Weekly article and other sources, was started while Tolkien, who eventually became an Oxford University Professor of Anglo-Saxon, was grading examination papers and impulsively wrote on one, "In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit." The book received both critical praise and large sales, and Tolkien's publishers, Allen & Unwin, asked him for a sequel, which the author took seventeen years to produce. In the meantime, while World War II was fought, Tolkien's vision of Middle-Earth and its inhabitants grew. His intent, according to various sources, was to write a fictional ancient history, rather than a fantasy, and in a January 1967 New York Times interview, claimed that he "detested" the popular style of tiny mythical creatures, pointing out that, "Hobbits are three to four feet in height. You can see people walking around like that." According to the Entertainment Weekly article, Tolkien, who also worked on the Oxford English Dictionary, claimed that, even as a child, he made up imaginary languages. After making up a language, he would create a history of the language and its imaginary speakers, then create alphabets, maps, calendars, genealogies, and stories for his imaginary world.
       Tolkien continued working on the sequel, noting in an appendix all the details of his mythical world. In 1950, Tolkien wrote to Allen & Unwin that he had "produced a monster," and described it as "immensely long, complex, rather bitter, and rather terrifying." His lengthy saga, which contained detailed maps and a 104-page appendix, was published during the mid-1950s in three parts, titled respectively, The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers and The Return of the King. Although critics and the general public were divided in their opinion of the complex trilogy, offering both admiration and disdain, later, when the books were published in paperback in the mid-1960s, its popularity grew as a modern classic and a counter-culture phenomenon, especially in the United States. By the 1970s, some Tolkien scholars and followers were studying and conversing in his made-up Elven language.
       According to a May 1997 article in The Times (London), Tolkien rejected several requests to purchase the screen rights to his books. A January 2001 Newsweek article reported that at one time, Tolkien was offended by a treatment presented to him of an animated version that changed the name of Elven waybread to "food concentrate," and a December 2001 The Times (London) reported that, in 1957, he refused to work with three Hollywood businessmen who pitched an animated version containing misspellings. Despite his misgivings, according to a December 2001 The Independent (London), Tolkien sold the film rights to The Lord of the Rings in 1968, and a November 1977 New York Times article reported that MGM and Disney considered the project. However, it was Arthur Rankin, Jr. and his partner Jules Bass, who produced a ninety-minute, American-Japanese animated version that aired as a special on NBC-TV in 1977. They also planned to release it later in theaters, followed by two other Tolkien adaptations. Although those plans did not come to fruition, in 1978, Saul Zaentz produced a version of the first half of the Ring trilogy, which was directed by animator Ralph Bakshi and combined animation with "rotoscoping" or live action footage copied onto animation paper. The poor box-office performance of that film, which was released by United Artists, caused Zaentz to abandon a sequel.
       A January 1997 Hollywood Reporter news item reported that other companies considered undertaking Tolkien's work after the 1978 production, and that Universal and DreamWorks had recently approached the Saul Zaentz Co. This was confirmed by a May 1997 The Times (London) article, which added that directors Peter Jackson and John Boorman had declared interest in the film. Although an August 1998 Variety article reported that Wingnut Films, which Jackson co-owns with his partner Fran Walsh, had struck a deal with Zaentz and Miramax to write and produce the Tolkien epic, after a year of script development and planning, Miramax and Wingnut could not reconcile their different approaches to the project. According to an August 1998 Screen International report, Miramax's co-chairmen, Harvey and Bob Weinstein, who wanted to compress the trilogy's story into a single film, gave Jackson three weeks to find a new backer. New Line Cinema took over Miramax's option, although the Weinsteins continued to serve as executive producers of the 2001 film, and the collaboration marked, according to an August 1998 Los Angeles Times article, "a rare cooperative venture between two rival companies."
       It has been reported in news articles that several of Tolkien's descendants became uncomfortable with a film version of their father's works. In the May 1997 The Times (London) article, Christopher, Tolkien's son and literary executor, said that aggressive fanatics of the books forced the family to flee England in 1975, and Tolkien's oldest son, John, expressed concern that further commercial pressures would detract from the book. In December 2001, The Independent (London) reported that Simon Tolkien, son of Christopher, claimed that he had been banned from the estate board and other family affairs for supporting the making of the film.
       The writing of the screenplay began in April 1997, according to a November Script 2001 article. Pleased that New Line supported his wish to film all three films simultaneously, Jackson explains in the production notes of the presskit, "I felt that in order to do the tale's epic nature justice, we had to shoot it as one big story." During the writing of the screenplay, Jackson, Walsh and fellow writer Philippa Boyens felt that they had to satisfy both Tolkien fans and those who had never read the book, thus necessitating some changes in the story. The book's journey through the Old Forest and the encounter with the animated corpses (barrow-wights) were cut to keep the pace of the film from slowing down. The popular character "Tom Bombadil" was deleted early in the writing of the screenplay for the same reason, although, in a December 2001 Cinefantastique article, Jackson said that they had hoped to make a brief reference to the character in the film, but ran out of time. The writing team expanded some of the female characters, especially "Arwen," who is barely mentioned in the first book of the trilogy, but becomes a pivotal character in the film by saving Frodo's life. The character's part required many revisions, according to a December 2001 Newsweek article, and troubled many fans, who heard rumors that she was being turned into a sword-wielding warrior.
       Although news items and internet websites discussed the casting of Sean Connery in the film, an August 1998 Variety article reported that Jackson planned to fill the lead roles with lesser known players. For the role of Frodo, Jackson auditioned over 150 actors, according to a November 2001 Entertainment Weekly article, before casting Elijah Wood, who actively competed for the part by submitting a homemade audition tape. Before Ian McKellen, whom Jackson described as the "please-God-let-us-have-him guy," could be cast as Gandalf, negotiations in scheduling had to be worked through. According to an October 1999 Hollywood Reporter news item, Irish actor Stuart Townsend was originally cast as "Aragorn," but was replaced by Viggo Mortensen. Ian Holm, who played "Frodo" in a 1970s BBC radio production, was cast as "Bilbo." British actor Orlando Bloom marked his major film debut in the role of "Legolas." Although the leads were mostly from Great Britain and the United States, according to an October 2000 Variety article, fifty-seven of the seventy-seven speaking parts were cast with people from New Zealand, where the film was shot. According to a November 2001 Entertainment Weekly article, the New Zealand government offered its army to play extras in a battle scene.
       The production notes stated that cast members underwent intensive physical training in swordfighting and horsemanship to prepare for their roles and for the arduous shooting schedule and challenging conditions they would be experiencing. Language coaches trained the cast in Tolkien's Elvish language and the various dialects created for the film. According to an April 2000 Observer (London) article, an Irish-like accent was assigned to the Elves, a West Country burr to the Hobbits, and the Dwarves were given a Cockney accent. In addition, according to a November 2001 Script article, Tolkien's pronunciation guides were followed and monitored by three academic advisors, as well as the two on-set dialect coaches.
       Besides a distinctive language, each of the various races in Middle-Earth was given an artistic style that was expressed through the architecture, clothing and physical features of the characters; Tolkien artists assisted production designer Grant Major in conceptualizing the look of the film, so that it would remain true to the author's original vision. According to the studio's production notes, an average of 150 costumes for each of the different cultures were made, including the smaller or larger versions of each costume for the character's "scale double." Prosthetic artists created facial and other physical features of the various races, and a special foam latexing oven was in constant use to make ears, Hobbit feet and Uruk-Hai arms and legs, along with props. To create the disparity between the three-and-a-half-foot Hobbits and seven-foot Wizards, "scale" doubles and forced perspective filming were used. In the scene at Bilbo's home in Hobbiton at the beginning of the film, actors McKellen and Holm were shot separately, on two different-sized sets.
       According to a December 2001 New York Times article, many of the leads had their faces scanned and body movements digitally captured for the special effects used in the film. A November 2001 Los Angeles Times article stated that every frame of the film was stored in a digital library, so that Jackson and his team could manipulate the lighting, landscapes, characters and even details like the elaborate smoke rings blown by Gandalf and Bilbo in an early scene. According to the production notes, many creatures, among them the Balrog, the Cave Troll and the Watcher, were entirely digital beings. According to the Cinefantastique article, the creatures commanding the most attention from the designers were the frightening Uruk-Hai, which were intentionally made in human form, because, according to Jackson, "the only truly scary thing in the world is other humans."
       As stated in the end credits, the film was shot entirely in New Zealand. Although an August 1998 Variety reported that Jackson believed his native New Zealand's landscapes would particularly suit the recreation of Middle-Earth, the decision to film there was partially financial. In a September 1998 Hollywood Reporter article, Jackson said that New Zealand had technical proficiency, education, English speakers and lower costs, and he believed he could not have made a film of The Lord of the Rings's quality in the United States.
       The production notes reported that artisans of earlier technologies were employed, among them glassblowers, blacksmiths, leather-workers, thatched-roofers, seamstresses and experts in medieval armor. The New Zealand army dug earthworks and built an access road for the production, according to the Cinefantastique article, and local citizens provided most of the 2,400 crewmen and 26,000 extras. Meanwhile, according to the November 2001 Entertainment Weekly article, the country's government created a cabinet-level position, which was dubbed "Minister of the Lord of the Rings" by the press, to expand the tourist and film industries in the country. According to a December 2001 New York Times article, Jackson had hoped to set up a permanent Tolkien museum to display items from the three films, but permission from the Tolkien Estate had not yet been obtained.
       Although interior scenes were filmed at Camperdown Studios in Wellington, New Zealand, a December 2001 New York Times article reported that the film was shot on location in over one hundred areas, and that at one point, seven units simultaneously shot different elements of the three films. Hobbiton sequences were filmed at Matamata, where, according to a December 2001 American Cinematographer article, flowers and vegetables were planted a year in advance of shooting. The Cinefantastique article reported that an unused army site at Fort Dorset, near the studio, was used for the Inn of the Prancing Pony's exteriors. Exteriors of Moria were shot on a backlot in the Hutt Valley and in Abel Tasman National Park. The Fellowship's river journey was filmed at Te Anau, and waterfalls on South Island were shot and combined with shots of a miniature set, a matte painting and photographic tiles to create scenes of Rivendell. In addition, miniature trees with autumn leaves, signifying the approaching end of the Elven race in Middle-Earth, were built and composited into the scenes. Scale models, both smaller and larger than the original, were made of many sets, often carved out of polystyrene.
       During the 274 days of principal photography, which spanned four-and-a-half months, the cast and crew formed strong friendships while working on the easy-going Jackson's reportedly amiable set. To commemorate the experience, the nine actors playing the film's "Fellowship" had the word for "nine" in one of Tolkien's languages tattooed somewhere on each of their bodies, according to the Los Angeles Times review.
       A June 2001 Entertainment Today news item reported that, six months after production ceased, a new opening was shot for the beginning of the film and that most of the dialogue was re-recorded at several studios in London, because the New Zealand studios were not fully soundproofed.
       The total cost of the three-film project has been reported in several sources to be $270 million. New Line negotiated that foreign distributors pay up front for all three films of the series, and according to a May 2001 Los Angeles Times article, German and New Zealand tax funds, along with the foreign distributors, paid for 65% of the cost. According to a February 2001 Screen International article, an official website for the film was first launched in May 1999. A November 2001 Daily Variety article reported that the film has marketing partnerships with Burger King, JVC, Barnes & Noble and General Mills. In addition, over forty licensed products are being marketed in conjunction with the film, including collectibles, swords, action figures, toys and video games. According to Exhibitor's Relations, as of January 1, 2002, the film had taken in over $174,000,000 in the domestic box office.
       The Fellowship of the Ring received Golden Globe nominations for Best Motion Picture-Drama, Best Director, Best Score and Best Original Song ("May It Be"). It was the first recipient of AFI's Movie of the Year award, with additional AFI awards given to Production designer Grant Major and Visual Effects Artist Jim Rygiel. Howard Shore was also nominated as AFI Composer of the Year. The film won an Academy Award for Best Cinematography and Best Achievement in Visual Effects and received the following Academy Award nominations: Best Art Direction, Best Costume Design, Best Director, Best Film Editing, Best Makeup, Best Original Score, Best Original Song, Best Motion Picture, Best Screenplay, Best Sound and Best Actor, Ian McKellen. In 2007, The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring was ranked number 50 on AFI's 100 Years...100 Movies-10th Anniversary Edition list of the greatest American films.

Miscellaneous Notes

Winner of two 2001 awards, including Best Original Score and Best Cinematography, from the Chicago Film Critics Association.

Winner of two 2001 awards, including Best Composer and Best Song ("May It Be" - Enya), from the Broadcast Film Critics Association.

Winner of three awards, including Movie of the Year, Production Designer of the Year and Digital Effects Artist of the Year (Jim Rygiel), at the 2001 American Film Institute (AFI) Awards. Also nominated for the award for Composer of the Year.

Winner of three 2001 Golden Satellite Awards, including Best Picture - Animated or Mixed Media, Best Film Editing and Best Sound, from the International Press Academy.

Winner of three 2001 awards, including Best Supporting Actress (Cate Blanchett), Best Production Design and the Special Achievement in Filmmaking Award (Peter Jackson), from the National Board of Review of Motion Pictures.

Winner of the 2001 Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Award for Best Supporting Actor (Ian McKellen). Also nominated for the award for Best Ensemble Cast.

Winner of the 2001 Golden Reel Award for Best Sound Editing for Music in a Feature Film by the Motion Picture Sound Editors (MPSE).

Winner of the 2001 award for Outstanding Achievement in Sound Mixing - Feature from the Cinema Audio Society (CAS).

Winner of the 2001 award for Best Music Score from the Los Angeles Film Critics Association.

Voted one of the 10 best films of 2001 by the American Film Institute (AFI).

Nominated for the 2001 Golden Laurel Award for Best Motion Picture from the Producers Guild of America (PGA).

Nominated for the 2001 Eddie Award for Best Edited Feature - Drama, from the American Cinema Editors (ACE).

Nominated for the 2001 award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in a Feature Film from the Directors Guild of America (DGA).

Nominated for the 2001 award for Best Screenplay Based on Material Previously Produced or Published from the Writers Guild of America (WGA).

Nominated for the 2001 Award for Best Production Design in a Feature Film - Period/Fantasy from the Society of Motion Picture & Television Art Directors/ Art Directors Guild (ADG).

Nominated for the 2001 Award for Best Cinematography from the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC).

Released in United States Winter December 19, 2001

Released in United States on Video August 6, 2002

J.R.R. Tolkien's novel was previously adapted as an animated feature in 1978, directed by Ralph Bakshi.

The combined budget for the trilogy is reportedly $270,000,000, making the estimated individual budget for each film $90,000,000.

Began shooting October 11, 1999.

Completed shooting December 22, 2000.

Weta Digital is Peter Jackson's New Zealand special effects company.

J.R.R. Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy was first published between July 1954 - October 1955.

Beginning in 2001, New Line will release the trilogy of J.R.R. Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings" which includes: "The Fellowship of the Ring", "The Two Towers", and "Return of the King". All three films were shot simultaneously.

Limited release in London, England December 14, 2001.

Wide release in United Kingdom December 21, 2001.

Released in South America January 1, 2002.

Released in United States Winter December 19, 2001

Released in United States on Video August 6, 2002

Winner of two 2002 People's Choice Awards including: Best Dramatic Motion Picture and Favorite Motion Picture (co-winner, along with "Spider-Man").