Evita


2h 15m 1996

Brief Synopsis

In this rock opera, a young peasant girl claws her way to the top of Argentine society, becoming first lady.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Historical
Musical
Biography
Music
Period
Adaptation
Release Date
1996
Production Company
Abbey Road Studios; Albert G Ruben Insurance Services Inc; Angels the Costumiers; Aon/Albert G. Ruben Insurance Services; Bulgari; Carlo Manzi Rentals; Cinergi Pictures Entertainment; Cts Studios; Eastman Kodak; Fendi; Hollywood Pictures; International Film Guarantors; Joe Dunton & Company International, Inc.; John A Hamby; Maratier; Metropolis Studios; Pacific Title & Art Studio; Palace Costume Company; Pompei; Robert Jellen; Shel Bachrach; Sony Music Studios, London; Summit Entertainment, Llc; Sylvia Wheeler Film Services Ltd.; Technicolor; Time, Inc.; Tirelli Costumi; Todd-Ao; Twickenham Film Studios; Twickenham Studios; WB De Lane Lea; Whitfield Street Studios
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution; Ascot Elite Entertainment Group; Cecchi Gori Pictures; Concorde Filmverleih Gmbh; Contender Entertainment; Filmcompagniet; Ufd; United International Pictures; Walt Disney Studios Distribution; Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment; Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures International
Location
Buenos Aires, Argentina; Budapest, Hungary

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 15m

Synopsis

As told by the story-teller Che, Eva Peron was born Eva Duarte, the illegitimate daughter of a penniless farmer. Still a teenager, Eva attaches herself to a popular tango singer, Agustin Magaldi and accompanies him to the Big City: Buenos Aires. Ambitious to succeed, Eva becomes an aspiring radio and film actress, eventually moving into influential circles within Buenos Aires society. Once her name is linked with the rising politician Juan Peron, tongues begin to wag, but the couple marry and Peron is elected President with the inspirational Eva at his side. Eva establishes herself as an ardent supporter of Peronism and promotes her unique blend of democracy with her "Rainbow Tour" to Europe. Attracting attention like no other woman before or since, Eva Peron hypnotized a nation of eighteen million people for seven years before her untimely death at the age of 33 in 1952.

Crew

Marcelo Acosta

Location Assistant

Peter Adams

Music

Edward J Adcock

Camera Operator

Ricardo Aliaga

Other

Joseph Alley

Carpenter

Armando Amador

Accountant

Peter Andrews

Production

David Appleby

Photography

Cate Arbeid

Production Coordinator

Sebastian Arzeno

Production Assistant

Shel Bachrach

Production Insurance

Simon Baker

Special Effects

David Balfour

Property Master

Angeline Ball

Song Performer

Livia Balogh

Assistant Set Dresser

Antonio Balseiro

Production Assistant

Zoltan Barath

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Ignacio Barbe

Animal Trainer

Sean Barett

Other

Clive Barrett

Assistant Editor

Sean Barrett

Other

John Bateman

Foley Mixer

Scotty Bates

Production Assistant

Keith Batterbee

Other

John Behan

Carpenter

Anna Behlmer

Rerecording

Ruben Bejarano

Grip

Ernie Bell

Other

Tony Bell

Boom Operator

Istvan Bese

Grip

Lee Biggs

Carpenter

Roy Biggs

Production

Adam Black

Location Manager

Kim Blank

Choreographer

Peter Bloor

Lighting Technician

Sam Bloor

Lighting Technician

Michele Bock

Set Production Assistant

Charles Bodycomb

Other

Rose Bologa

Hairdresser

Natalia Bonny

Art Assistant

Eileen Booth

Other

Paula Boram

Foley Artist

Cecilia Bossi

Location Assistant

Pablo Bossi

Production

Judith Bouley

Casting

Chris Bradley

Scenic Artist

Federico Brizzio

Art Assistant

Fred Brown

Lighting Technician

Rudi Buckle

Other

John Buckley

Special Thanks To

Justine Burns

Art Assistant

Alan Butler

Camera

John Buxton

Casting Associate

John Byrnes

Other

David Caddick

Music Supervisor

David Caddick

Music Conductor

David Caddick

Music Producer

Kate Carin

Wardrobe

Orla Caroll

Hairdresser

Denis Carrigan

Special Thanks To

Orla Carroll

Hairdresser

Darryl Carter

Carpenter

Jack Carter

Construction Manager

Melanie Carter

Costumes

Gilly Case

Assistant Location Manager

Carolyne Chauncey

Assistant Editor

James Cheek

Special Thanks To

Peter Childs

Other

Iris Christy

Other

Ina Clare

Other

Nigel Clay

Special Thanks To

John Clifford

Assistant

Colin Codner

Other

Bill Coe

Camera

Marlon Cole

Props

Matt Colleran

Other

Adam Cooper

Camera

Hugo Cousillas

Location Assistant

Nicolas Hippisley Coxe

Production

Annie Crawford

Costumes

Gill Crawford

Costumes

Kenny Crouch

Wardrobe Supervisor

Francesca Crowder

Hairdresser

Bob Crowdey

Special Thanks To

Gabor Csakovits

Special Effects

David Cullen

Original Music

Emma Cullen

Assistant

Nick Curtis

Music Conductor

Derek Dacombe

Other

Jose Patricio Daire

Special Thanks To

Deborah Dalton

Assistant

Matt Dalton

Accounting Assistant

Diane Dancklefsen

Other

Richard Daniel

Other

Dennis Davidson

Special Thanks To

Jake Davies

Assistant Engineer

Laura Day

Other

Yves De Bono

Special Effects Supervisor

Ulises De La Orden

Costumes

Mari-france Decloux

Assistant Set Decorator

Anna Defreitas

Other

Alison Del Rio

Other

Eduardo Del Rio

Other

Silvana Delfino

Art Assistant

Sandor Denes

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Marc Denize

Assistant Set Decorator

Yessenia Disla

Casting Associate

Mike Dixon

Music Conductor

Christopher Dodd

Special Thanks To

Florencia Dominquez

Other

Dan Dorlin

Other

Simon Downes

Assistant Director

Omar Duca

Props

Marcelo Dujovne

Office Manager (Argentina Unit)

Aniko Dunaveczky

Set Production Assistant

Carole Dunne

Hairdresser

Joe Dunton

Special Thanks To

Trevor Dyer

Construction

Richard Earl

Art Director

Emilio Estefan

Special Thanks To

Emilio Estefan

Music Producer

Mark Evans

Lighting Technician

Keith Fairbairn

Music

Ricardo Fasan

Hair Assistant

Bryon Fear

Production Assistant

Daniel Feijoo

Art Director

David Feldman

Assistant Editor

Drago Fernandez

Hair Assistant

Florencia Fernandez

Set Production Assistant

Lucinda Ferrer

Set Production Assistant

Howard Feuer

Special Thanks To

Anne Frankel

Other

Laura Friguerio

Location Assistant

John E Gallagher

Assistant Director

Peter Gantner

Props

Juan Pablo Garibotti

Art Assistant

Miranda Garrison

Choreographer

Els Gevaert

Other

Susie Forte Gilman

Other

Diomar Giraldo

Other

Fabiana Giudicotti

Other

Clive Goble

Other

Ronald Godard

Special Thanks To

Pablo Gomez Pereyra

Video Playback

Karen Gonzalez

Casting Associate

Andy Good

Carpenter

Gavin Gordon

Carpenter

Kellie Gordon

Assistant

Chris Gough

Other

Mark Graham

Music

Richard Graysmark

Assistant Director

Ian Green

Carpenter

Leonard Green

Foley

Virginia Green

Other

Mark Griffin

Special Effects

Pauline Griffiths

Foley Artist

Alan Grosch

Lighting Technician

Peter Grove

Carpenter

Edward Grundy

Other

Tamas Guba

Location Manager

Sergio Gullco

Location Assistant

Zsuzsa Gurban

Assistant Director

Andrew Guyett

Other

Michael Guyett

Other

Annie Hadley

Wardrobe

Jackie Hall

Other

Les Hall

Carpenter

Sir Peter Hall

Special Thanks To

Richard Hall

Other

Richard Hall

Other

Gerry Hambling

Editor

John A Hamby

Production Insurance

Kenneth A Hansen

Auditor

Bob Harper

Other

Tarn Harper

Accounting Assistant

Mike Harris

Other

Mike Harris

Other

Nina Hartstone

Assistant Sound Editor

Sarah Hauldren

Assistant Art Director

John M Hay

Costume Designer

John Hedges

Construction

Kevin Hedges

Carpenter

Paul Hedges

Property Master

Caresse Henry

Assistant

Sid Hinson

Other

Mark Holmes

Wardrobe

Peter Holt

Foley Editor

Gyorgy Homonnay

Wardrobe

Roberto Horbal

Accountant

Agota Horvath

Cashier

Amy Hubbard

Casting Associate

Dan Hubbard

Casting Associate

John Hubbard

Casting

Ros Hubbard

Casting

Jean-michel Hugon

Art Director

Peter Hunt

Other

Robert Ireland

Assistant Editor

Bob Izzard

Security

Kati Jakots

Makeup

Robert Jellen

Production Insurance

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Historical
Musical
Biography
Music
Period
Adaptation
Release Date
1996
Production Company
Abbey Road Studios; Albert G Ruben Insurance Services Inc; Angels the Costumiers; Aon/Albert G. Ruben Insurance Services; Bulgari; Carlo Manzi Rentals; Cinergi Pictures Entertainment; Cts Studios; Eastman Kodak; Fendi; Hollywood Pictures; International Film Guarantors; Joe Dunton & Company International, Inc.; John A Hamby; Maratier; Metropolis Studios; Pacific Title & Art Studio; Palace Costume Company; Pompei; Robert Jellen; Shel Bachrach; Sony Music Studios, London; Summit Entertainment, Llc; Sylvia Wheeler Film Services Ltd.; Technicolor; Time, Inc.; Tirelli Costumi; Todd-Ao; Twickenham Film Studios; Twickenham Studios; WB De Lane Lea; Whitfield Street Studios
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution; Ascot Elite Entertainment Group; Cecchi Gori Pictures; Concorde Filmverleih Gmbh; Contender Entertainment; Filmcompagniet; Ufd; United International Pictures; Walt Disney Studios Distribution; Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment; Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures International
Location
Buenos Aires, Argentina; Budapest, Hungary

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 15m

Award Wins

Best Song

1996

Award Nominations

Set Decoration

1996

Best Cinematography

1996

Best Editing

1996

Best Sound

1996

Articles

Evita


In a pivotal scene from Alan Parker's Evita (1966), Madonna stands on the Casa Rosada, the same balcony from which Eva Peron stood almost fifty years before. With her hair wrapped into a chignon, her couture clothing, and draped in jewels, Madonna firmly captures the look of Peron in that moment. She was Peron's alter ego, however, long before she stepped on that balcony.

The motion picture Evita, released in 1996, had been down a harrowing path of evolution. Based on the musical of the same name, written sixteen years prior by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice, it is the glamorized story of Eva Peron, wife of President Juan Peron of Argentina, in office from 1946-55. The project's journey began in 1979, when producer Robert Stigwood suggested the idea to director Alan Parker during a tennis match. When Parker declined, an upset Stigwood smashed him over the head with a racket-not off to a good start. A slew of potential directors blew through, including Francis Ford Coppola and Richard Attenborough, but none stuck. In 1987 Oliver Stone signed on, and Madonna began courting for the role she claimed she was destined to play. After talks fell through with Ms. Ciccone, Stone almost clinched Meryl Streep for the part, then Michelle Pfeiffer, but eventually dropped the project altogether when then-Argentinean president Carlos Menem denied him permission to film there. Which is when Alan Parker reenters the picture, takes control of the project, casts Madonna, and starts production in 1995.

Madonna's fever pitch obsession with Eva Peron (Evita as she preferred to be called) is easy to understand; the striking parallels between their lives almost suggest a reincarnation of some kind. Both coming from humble backgrounds, both women were models, singers, actresses, pioneers, and outcasts-the driving force seeming to be a manic quest for upward reinvention. They have been revered and reviled; when a film critic writes of "the bitch goddess of criminal celebrity," you're not sure whom he means. Maybe because he is referring to them both. Thus Madonna's kindred connection with Evita is almost innate; Peron inspired a kind of rock star legend with her meteoric rise to fame and fabulous blowout with her early death. And always in style; this is a woman who arranged for a manicure after death in order to make her corpse more presentable.

The production of Evita was as extravagant as the subject matter; the 84-day shoot involved 93 full cast members, over 40,000 extras, and totaled out at over 60 million dollars. A replica of the Peron palace was under construction in London, since shooting had been forbidden at the original location. This is when it pays to have Madonna in your cast: she persuaded President Menem to grant access to Casa Rosada for the famous balcony scene. Her ecstatic response says it all: "I didn't come all the way to Buenos Aires to sing 'Don't Cry for Me Argentina' on a sound stage."

The investment paid off handsomely; Evita was nominated for six Oscar®s, including nominations for Cinematography, Art Direction, and Editing. Lloyd Webber and Rice took home the Academy Award for Music (Original Song), for "You Must Love Me." The worldwide gross for the film totaled over 140 million.

Parker cast Jonathan Pryce, best remembered for Brazil (1985), as Eva's overshadowed husband Juan Peron. Antonio Banderas, a Spanish actor with his breakthrough roles attributed to director Pedro Almodovar, played Che, an Everyman narrator figure. Neither actor could hold a matchstick to the drama of Madonna, however, who faced death threats, crazed mobs and vicious paparazzi, and, towards the end of shooting, a pregnancy - all an appropriate measure of drama to suit the original Material Girl.

Director: Alan Parker
Producers: Alan Parker, Robert Stigwood, Andrew G. Vajna
Screenplay: Andrew Lloyd Webber, Tim Rice, Alan Parker, Oliver Stone
Cinematography: Darius Khondji
Art Direction: Richard Earl, Jean-Michel Hugon
Music: Andrew Lloyd Webber, Tim Rice
Cast: Madonna (Eva Peron), Antonio Banderas (Che), Jonathan Pryce (Juan Peron), Jimmy Nail (Agustin Magaldi), Victoria Sus (Dona Juana), Julian Littman (Brother Juan).
C-134m.
Evita

Evita

In a pivotal scene from Alan Parker's Evita (1966), Madonna stands on the Casa Rosada, the same balcony from which Eva Peron stood almost fifty years before. With her hair wrapped into a chignon, her couture clothing, and draped in jewels, Madonna firmly captures the look of Peron in that moment. She was Peron's alter ego, however, long before she stepped on that balcony. The motion picture Evita, released in 1996, had been down a harrowing path of evolution. Based on the musical of the same name, written sixteen years prior by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice, it is the glamorized story of Eva Peron, wife of President Juan Peron of Argentina, in office from 1946-55. The project's journey began in 1979, when producer Robert Stigwood suggested the idea to director Alan Parker during a tennis match. When Parker declined, an upset Stigwood smashed him over the head with a racket-not off to a good start. A slew of potential directors blew through, including Francis Ford Coppola and Richard Attenborough, but none stuck. In 1987 Oliver Stone signed on, and Madonna began courting for the role she claimed she was destined to play. After talks fell through with Ms. Ciccone, Stone almost clinched Meryl Streep for the part, then Michelle Pfeiffer, but eventually dropped the project altogether when then-Argentinean president Carlos Menem denied him permission to film there. Which is when Alan Parker reenters the picture, takes control of the project, casts Madonna, and starts production in 1995. Madonna's fever pitch obsession with Eva Peron (Evita as she preferred to be called) is easy to understand; the striking parallels between their lives almost suggest a reincarnation of some kind. Both coming from humble backgrounds, both women were models, singers, actresses, pioneers, and outcasts-the driving force seeming to be a manic quest for upward reinvention. They have been revered and reviled; when a film critic writes of "the bitch goddess of criminal celebrity," you're not sure whom he means. Maybe because he is referring to them both. Thus Madonna's kindred connection with Evita is almost innate; Peron inspired a kind of rock star legend with her meteoric rise to fame and fabulous blowout with her early death. And always in style; this is a woman who arranged for a manicure after death in order to make her corpse more presentable. The production of Evita was as extravagant as the subject matter; the 84-day shoot involved 93 full cast members, over 40,000 extras, and totaled out at over 60 million dollars. A replica of the Peron palace was under construction in London, since shooting had been forbidden at the original location. This is when it pays to have Madonna in your cast: she persuaded President Menem to grant access to Casa Rosada for the famous balcony scene. Her ecstatic response says it all: "I didn't come all the way to Buenos Aires to sing 'Don't Cry for Me Argentina' on a sound stage." The investment paid off handsomely; Evita was nominated for six Oscar®s, including nominations for Cinematography, Art Direction, and Editing. Lloyd Webber and Rice took home the Academy Award for Music (Original Song), for "You Must Love Me." The worldwide gross for the film totaled over 140 million. Parker cast Jonathan Pryce, best remembered for Brazil (1985), as Eva's overshadowed husband Juan Peron. Antonio Banderas, a Spanish actor with his breakthrough roles attributed to director Pedro Almodovar, played Che, an Everyman narrator figure. Neither actor could hold a matchstick to the drama of Madonna, however, who faced death threats, crazed mobs and vicious paparazzi, and, towards the end of shooting, a pregnancy - all an appropriate measure of drama to suit the original Material Girl. Director: Alan Parker Producers: Alan Parker, Robert Stigwood, Andrew G. Vajna Screenplay: Andrew Lloyd Webber, Tim Rice, Alan Parker, Oliver Stone Cinematography: Darius Khondji Art Direction: Richard Earl, Jean-Michel Hugon Music: Andrew Lloyd Webber, Tim Rice Cast: Madonna (Eva Peron), Antonio Banderas (Che), Jonathan Pryce (Juan Peron), Jimmy Nail (Agustin Magaldi), Victoria Sus (Dona Juana), Julian Littman (Brother Juan). C-134m.

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video August 5, 1997

Released in United States December 14, 1996 (World premiere in Hollywood, California December 14, 1996.)

Released in United States December 1997 (Shown at Cairo International Film Festival (Opening Night) December 1-14, 1997.)

Winner of the 1996 Golden Satellite Award for Best Musical from the International Press Academy.

Released in United States Winter December 25, 1996

Expanded Release in United States January 1, 1997

Wide Release in United States January 10, 1997

Released in United States on Video August 5, 1997

Released in United States December 14, 1996

Released in United States December 1997

Shown at Cairo International Film Festival (Opening Night) December 1-14, 1997.

Based upon the hit Broadway and West End musical by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice.

Project was previously at Weintraub Entertainment Group (WEG), with Carolco Pictures assisting in financing.

An earlier effort to do a movie version of "Evita" was cancelled in 1982 when director Ken Russell dropped out of the project over a casting dispute with producer Robert Stigwood.

Glenn Gordon Caron was the second director attached, when project was first at Hollywood Pictures.

Oliver Stone was originally involved as director. He became attached again, fall 1993, but left the project summer 1994 due to a budget dispute with Robert Stigwood.

Completed shooting May 29, 1996.

Began shooting February 8, 1996.

Meryl Streep was originally set to star, but dropped out in August 1989.

Despite the standard practice of dubbing soundtracks in certain major territories like France, Germany, Italy and Spain, "Evita" will be subtitled everywhere in the world. This decision was made by the filmmakers in part because of Madonna's status as a singing star whose voice is recognizable around the world.

Expanded wide release in USA January 24, 1997.

Expanded wide release in USA January 17, 1997.

Wide release in United Kingdom January 1, 1997.

Released in United States Winter December 25, 1996

Expanded Release in United States January 1, 1997

Wide Release in United States January 10, 1997

Brian Morris was co-winner, along with Janet Patterson for "The Portrait of a Lady" (New Zealand/United States/United Kingdom), of the 1996 award for Best Production Design from the Los Angeles Film Critics Association.