A Few Good Men


2h 18m 1992
A Few Good Men

Brief Synopsis

When a Marine dies on a US Navy base, two fellow Marines stand trial for murder.

Film Details

Also Known As
På heder och samvete, hommes d'honneur
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Thriller
Legal
Adaptation
Release Date
1992
Production Company
Roger Stevenson
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing International
Location
Washington, DC, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Culver Studios, Culver City, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 18m

Synopsis

Story about an Navy lawyer's struggle to uncover the truth about a court martial.

Crew

Donald Abblett

Other

Steve Abrums

Makeup

Pamela Allain

Other

Linda Allan-folsom

Production Coordinator

David Amberik

Production

Enzo Angileri

Hair Stylist

Audie Aragon

Grip

John Armstrong

Production

Joseph M Aspromonti

Production Assistant

Darryl Athons

Costumes

Lisa Aubel

Production Assistant

Chet Badalato

Production

Carmen Baker

Assistant Sound Editor

Sidney R. Baldwin

Photography

Kevin Bartnof

Foley Artist

Donah Bassett

Negative Cutting

George Batez

Boom Operator

Margo Baxley

Costumes

Alison Belanger

Assistant Production Accountant

Alan Edward Bell

Assistant Editor

James P. Bittl

Other

Richard Boris

Other

David M Brahms

Consultant

David Brown

Producer

James Brown

Transportation Coordinator

Russ Buckens

Production

Charles L Campbell

Sound Editor

Lucinda Campbell

Costumes

Desmond Cannon

Adr Editor

Frank Capra

Assistant Director

Chris Centrella

Key Grip

Kenneth Cervi

Production

Algric L Chaplin

Assistant Director

Tim Chau

Sound Editor

Jerry Cipperley

Production

Lynda Cipperley

Production

Nancy Cone

Costumes

Daneen Conroy

Assistant

Leslie Cornyn

Post-Production Accountant

Jimmy Cotton

Song Performer

Matthew Craven

Grip

Eugene Crum

Special Effects Coordinator

Richard Davis

Location Manager

Tim A Davison

Stunt Coordinator

Sandy De Crescent

Music Contractor

Richard Dean

Makeup

Suzanne Degrandis

Construction

Brian Devin

Grip

Christy Dimmig

Post-Production Supervisor

Michael Doven

Assistant

Phil Downey

Color Timer

Dean Drabin

Adr Mixer

Kelly Dugan

Production

Stephen J Eads

Production

Robert Eber

Sound Mixer

Louis L Edemann

Sound Editor

Elizabeth Ervin

Production Coordinator

Renee Faia

Art Department Coordinator

Earl Forest

Song

Leigh French

Adr

Vincent Galindez

Camera Assistant

Sandra Garcia

Foley Recordist

Mickey Garrigan

Production Assistant

David Garris

Production

Randall Lee Gaston

Production

Tony Gaudioz

Camera Operator

Lenny Geschke

Sound Editor

Scott Gillis

Best Boy Grip

William S. Gilmore Jr.

Executive Producer

Roy Gittens

Other

William Goldman

Creative Consultant

Jeremy Gordon

Sound Editor

Idlefonso Goris

Other

Marilyn Graf

Foley Mixer

Gloria Gresham

Costume Designer

Ralph Grierson

Music

Khan Griffith

Other

Susanna Griffith

Casting Associate

Mark Hadland

Lighting

Ann Hadsell

Adr

Robin Harlan

Foley Artist

Alison Harstedt

Assistant Production Accountant

William G Harvey

Song

Edouard F Henriques

Makeup

Bob Hile

Other

Janet Hirshenson

Casting

Michael Hirshenson

Casting Associate

Andrea Horta

Adr Editor

John Horton

Special Thanks To

Jody Hummer

Assistant Location Manager

Jan Jenkins

Casting

Benson Jones

Production

Jeff Jones

Assistant

Pam Jones

Assistant

Artie Kane

Music Conductor

Gary B Kibbe

Director Of Photography

Gary B Kibbe

Dp/Cinematographer

Ian Kincaid

Lighting Technician

Dean M King

Grip

David Klassen

Art Director

Rick Kline

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Jeff Kluttz

Grip

Elliot L. Koretz

Sound Editor

Gabor Kover

Camera Operator

K Lenna Kunkel

Production Accountant

Robert Lampkin

Caterer

Gregory A Landis

Production

John Kris Larsen

Production

Stephen A Latina

Production

Tom Lay

Visual Effects

Jerry Leiber

Song

Robert Leighton

Editor

Clair Leucart

Production

Steve Levine

Other

Bob Limon

Production

Lea Loa

Production

Patty Loveless

Song Performer

Ken Lubin

Production

Nina Lucia

Assistant Editor

Keith Madden

Projectionist

Hummie Mann

Music Producer

Hummie Mann

Original Music

Hugh Mccallum

Dolly Grip

Michael Mcclosky

Special Thanks To

Mark Mckenzie

Original Music

Kerry Lyn Mckissick

Script Supervisor

Dennis Mclaughlin

Production

Patrick A Mclaughlin

Production

Craig Molsberry

Other

Joe Morrisey

Sound Editor

Mary Morrisey

Assistant Editor

Jerry Moss

Property Master

Joel Moss

Music

Colin Mouat

Sound Editor

J Michael Muro

Steadicam Operator

Bill Murphy

Production

Chuck Neely

Sound Editor

Mel Neiman

Other

Steve Nevius

Editor

Steven Nicolaides

Coproducer

Steven Nicolaides

Production Manager

Dayton Nietert

Rigging Gaffer

Kenneth Nishino

Assistant Camera Operator

Annika Nord

Production Assistant

Kevin O'connell

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Billy O'leary

Rigging Gaffer

Bettina O'mara

Other

David Page

Costumes

Matt Patterson

Other

Ken Peterson

Assistant Property Master

Rachel Pfeffer

Executive Producer

Darrin Porter

Other

Paul Postelnicu

Camera Assistant

Ed Powell

Production

Catherine Rae Purves

Assistant

Jim Quinn

Other

Manny Quinones

Other

Lyndell Quiyou

Hair Stylist

Becky Raiche

Production

Craig Raiche

Assistant Property Master

Virginia Randolph-weaver

Set Designer

Darin Raney

Art Assistant

Brad Rea

Dolly Grip

Ted Reed

Production

Rob Reiner

Producer

Robert Richardson

Dp/Cinematographer

Robert Richardson

Director Of Photography

J. Michael Riva

Production Designer

Darin Rivetti

Production Assistant

Alison C. Rosa

Other

Doug Rosenberger

Foreman

Tim Roslan

Transportation Captain

Curtis Roush

Music Editor

Danny Rowe

Production

Matthew H Rowland

Assistant Director

Mark Sawicki

Other

Andrew Scheinman

Producer

Andy Schwartz

Photography

Rob Scott

Boom Operator

Terry Scott

Construction Coordinator

Dennis Seawright

Assistant Camera Operator

Marc Shaiman

Music Producer

Marc Shaiman

Music

Alison Sherman

Production Coordinator

Nick Shuster

Camera

Gary L. G. Simpson

Other

Larry Singer

Adr Editor

Keith Smith

Camera Assistant

Ray Smith

Special Thanks To

Aaron Sorkin

Screenplay

Aaron Sorkin

Play As Source Material

Demetra Stamus

Production Assistant

Alisa Statman

Assistant Director

Roger Stevenson

Cable Operator

Mike Stoller

Song

Jeff Stott

Coproducer

Robert Stromberg

Other

Ken Strong

Production

John Sullivan

Other

Victor Svimonoff

Gaffer

Film Details

Also Known As
På heder och samvete, hommes d'honneur
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Thriller
Legal
Adaptation
Release Date
1992
Production Company
Roger Stevenson
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing International
Location
Washington, DC, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Culver Studios, Culver City, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 18m

Award Nominations

Best Editing

1992
Robert Leighton

Best Picture

1992

Best Sound

1992

Best Supporting Actor

1992
Jack Nicholson

Articles

A Few Good Men


Mention the 1992 film A Few Good Men in a conversation, and within a few minutes you'll invariably hear someone's best Jack Nicholson impression as he snarls, "You can't handle the truth!" These five words landed A Few Good Men at #29 on the American Film Institute's 100 Years, 100 Movie Quotes list. The role also landed Jack Nicholson a cool $5 million - not bad for 4 scenes of screen time and 2 weeks work!

Nicholson stars alongside Tom Cruise and Demi Moore in this story of a military lawyer assigned to defend two Marines against murder charges. Adapted by Aaron Sorkin from his own Broadway play, the film rights for A Few Good Men were sold before the play even premiered. Sorkin, who later created the television series The West Wing (1999-2006), was inspired to write the story of A Few Good Men at age 28 after a telephone conversation with his older sister, a Navy Judge Advocate General lawyer. As in the film, she was being sent to Guantanamo Bay to work on a hazing case involving Marines and an alleged "Code Red" order. Shortly after the conversation, Sorkin reportedly went to his bartending job at the Palace theatre and began writing the script on cocktail napkins. It was his first full-length play. Sorkin makes a cameo appearance in the film version of A Few Good Men, appearing as an anonymous man in a bar; he would continue to appear in cameos in his 1995 film The American President and his critically acclaimed but short-lived TV series Sports Night (1998-2000).

While lead Tom Cruise is one of the biggest box office stars in recent film history, Nicholson was the center of attention during the filming of Men. From the bio Jack's Life, by Patrick McGilligan, "The cast, made up of mostly Hollywood's young guard, showed themselves in awe of this actor who was entering his third decade of stardom. When the cast gathered for the first read-through, everybody stirred when Nicholson entered the room. They scurried to their seats. 'It was so strange,' the actor told director Rob Reiner afterward. 'I felt like the [expletive] Lincoln Memorial. I blushed, actually.'"

But Nicholson did not merely rest on his laurels: for the filming of the climactic courtroom scene, Reiner required several takes of Jack's monologue in order to film different characters' reactions. Reiner explained: "We have this eighteen-minute scene in the courtroom at the end, and he's got a speech that's, like, two pages long. And he gets all worked up. He comes in there and bangs it right off. He's there to work and do his job. And then we did coverage on all the other people, and he was off-camera. He must have done the thing fifty times, with the same amount of enthusiasm, with the same amount of energy every time. I was surprised, because you get ideas about a guy of his stature. And I said, 'Jack, it's amazing, you do your...' And he says to me simply, 'Raab, I love to act. I don't get a chance to play a part this good very often.' And that's it. He loves to act."

In addition to Nicholson, Cruise, and Moore, A Few Good Men is well supported by its additional cast, including Kevin Bacon and Kiefer Sutherland. Sutherland is well out of the shadow of his father Donald with his recent success with the television series 24, but he struggled with his driving skill during filming. The scene in which his character drives the legal team around the base called for multiple takes because he clipped a couple of the Marines performing as extras as he tried to navigate a military jeep by them. Joshua Malina, who can currently be seen on The West Wing, was the only original member from the Broadway version to make it to the screen, albeit in a bit part. In a 2003 interview, the actor commented, "Still, I made my film debut with Jack Nicholson. I literally had five words, three of them 'yes,' two of them 'sir,' but if you're going to make a film debut, it's nice making it with Jack Nicholson."

A Few Good Men also features a few other actors in minor roles who would go on to bigger film and television careers, including Cuba Gooding, Jr. and Noah Wyle. Gooding, Jr. would win an Oscar® for his role in the Tom Cruise-pic Jerry Maguire (1996), and Wyle is the longest-running original cast member on television's ER (1994- present). Director Reiner's sister-in-law, Maud Winchester, was also cast in a bit role. The crew had some notable offspring in it, including Frank Capra III as first assistant director and Marlene Dietrich's grandson, J. Michael Riva, as the production designer.

A Few Good Men is credited with the most simultaneous world premieres, with over 50 occurring all over the globe upon its release. Its success seemed to bring out the diva in Demi Moore, who, upon being provided with a private plane to take her to the New York premiere, reportedly demanded a second plane to accommodate her luggage. The film scored four Oscar® nominations, including a Best Supporting Actor for Nicholson, but didn't win an Academy Awards. Still, the filmmakers think they got their $5 million worth for Nicholson's now-legendary performance. As he once explained, "Let me put it to you this way. They won't pay it to you if you ain't worth it. Period."

Producer: David Brown, Rob Reiner, Andrew Scheinman
Director: Rob Reiner
Screenplay: Aaron Sorkin
Cinematography: Robert Richardson
Film Editing: Robert Leighton, Steven Nevius
Art Direction: David Klassen
Music: Marc Shaiman
Cast: Tom Cruise (Lt. Daniel Kaffe), Jack Nicholson (Col. Nathan R. Jessep), Demi Moore (Lt. Cdr. JoAnne Galloway), Kevin Bacon (Capt. Jack Ross), Kiefer Sutherland (Lt. Jonathan Kendrick), Kevin Pollak (Lt. Sam Weinberg).
C-138m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning.

by Eleanor Quin
A Few Good Men

A Few Good Men

Mention the 1992 film A Few Good Men in a conversation, and within a few minutes you'll invariably hear someone's best Jack Nicholson impression as he snarls, "You can't handle the truth!" These five words landed A Few Good Men at #29 on the American Film Institute's 100 Years, 100 Movie Quotes list. The role also landed Jack Nicholson a cool $5 million - not bad for 4 scenes of screen time and 2 weeks work! Nicholson stars alongside Tom Cruise and Demi Moore in this story of a military lawyer assigned to defend two Marines against murder charges. Adapted by Aaron Sorkin from his own Broadway play, the film rights for A Few Good Men were sold before the play even premiered. Sorkin, who later created the television series The West Wing (1999-2006), was inspired to write the story of A Few Good Men at age 28 after a telephone conversation with his older sister, a Navy Judge Advocate General lawyer. As in the film, she was being sent to Guantanamo Bay to work on a hazing case involving Marines and an alleged "Code Red" order. Shortly after the conversation, Sorkin reportedly went to his bartending job at the Palace theatre and began writing the script on cocktail napkins. It was his first full-length play. Sorkin makes a cameo appearance in the film version of A Few Good Men, appearing as an anonymous man in a bar; he would continue to appear in cameos in his 1995 film The American President and his critically acclaimed but short-lived TV series Sports Night (1998-2000). While lead Tom Cruise is one of the biggest box office stars in recent film history, Nicholson was the center of attention during the filming of Men. From the bio Jack's Life, by Patrick McGilligan, "The cast, made up of mostly Hollywood's young guard, showed themselves in awe of this actor who was entering his third decade of stardom. When the cast gathered for the first read-through, everybody stirred when Nicholson entered the room. They scurried to their seats. 'It was so strange,' the actor told director Rob Reiner afterward. 'I felt like the [expletive] Lincoln Memorial. I blushed, actually.'" But Nicholson did not merely rest on his laurels: for the filming of the climactic courtroom scene, Reiner required several takes of Jack's monologue in order to film different characters' reactions. Reiner explained: "We have this eighteen-minute scene in the courtroom at the end, and he's got a speech that's, like, two pages long. And he gets all worked up. He comes in there and bangs it right off. He's there to work and do his job. And then we did coverage on all the other people, and he was off-camera. He must have done the thing fifty times, with the same amount of enthusiasm, with the same amount of energy every time. I was surprised, because you get ideas about a guy of his stature. And I said, 'Jack, it's amazing, you do your...' And he says to me simply, 'Raab, I love to act. I don't get a chance to play a part this good very often.' And that's it. He loves to act." In addition to Nicholson, Cruise, and Moore, A Few Good Men is well supported by its additional cast, including Kevin Bacon and Kiefer Sutherland. Sutherland is well out of the shadow of his father Donald with his recent success with the television series 24, but he struggled with his driving skill during filming. The scene in which his character drives the legal team around the base called for multiple takes because he clipped a couple of the Marines performing as extras as he tried to navigate a military jeep by them. Joshua Malina, who can currently be seen on The West Wing, was the only original member from the Broadway version to make it to the screen, albeit in a bit part. In a 2003 interview, the actor commented, "Still, I made my film debut with Jack Nicholson. I literally had five words, three of them 'yes,' two of them 'sir,' but if you're going to make a film debut, it's nice making it with Jack Nicholson." A Few Good Men also features a few other actors in minor roles who would go on to bigger film and television careers, including Cuba Gooding, Jr. and Noah Wyle. Gooding, Jr. would win an Oscar® for his role in the Tom Cruise-pic Jerry Maguire (1996), and Wyle is the longest-running original cast member on television's ER (1994- present). Director Reiner's sister-in-law, Maud Winchester, was also cast in a bit role. The crew had some notable offspring in it, including Frank Capra III as first assistant director and Marlene Dietrich's grandson, J. Michael Riva, as the production designer. A Few Good Men is credited with the most simultaneous world premieres, with over 50 occurring all over the globe upon its release. Its success seemed to bring out the diva in Demi Moore, who, upon being provided with a private plane to take her to the New York premiere, reportedly demanded a second plane to accommodate her luggage. The film scored four Oscar® nominations, including a Best Supporting Actor for Nicholson, but didn't win an Academy Awards. Still, the filmmakers think they got their $5 million worth for Nicholson's now-legendary performance. As he once explained, "Let me put it to you this way. They won't pay it to you if you ain't worth it. Period." Producer: David Brown, Rob Reiner, Andrew Scheinman Director: Rob Reiner Screenplay: Aaron Sorkin Cinematography: Robert Richardson Film Editing: Robert Leighton, Steven Nevius Art Direction: David Klassen Music: Marc Shaiman Cast: Tom Cruise (Lt. Daniel Kaffe), Jack Nicholson (Col. Nathan R. Jessep), Demi Moore (Lt. Cdr. JoAnne Galloway), Kevin Bacon (Capt. Jack Ross), Kiefer Sutherland (Lt. Jonathan Kendrick), Kevin Pollak (Lt. Sam Weinberg). C-138m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning. by Eleanor Quin

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Rob Reiner was nominated for the Directors Guild of America's 1992 Outstanding Directorial Achievement Award.

Rob Reiner, David Brown and Andrew Scheinman were nominated for the Golden Laurel Award (1992) by the Producers Guild of America.

Released in United States Winter December 11, 1992

Released in United States on Video June 30, 1993

Released in United States December 1992

The Manhattan Project is David Brown's production company.

The US Defense Department refused to endorse the project, thus barring shooting from taking place on any military installations.

Completed shooting January 30, 1992.

Began shooting October 21, 1991.

Play was performed at the Eisenhower Arts, Washington DC, Fall 1989.

Released in United States Winter December 11, 1992

Released in United States on Video June 30, 1993

Released in United States December 1992 (Prior to its overseas opening, film was previewed on Friday, December 11th, 1992 (the same day it opened in the USA) in 53 countries, including Great Britain, Germany, France and Japan, making it the first-ever worldwide premiere.)

Jack Nicholson was named best supporting actor by the National Board of Review (1992).