William Goldman


Author, Screenwriter

About

Also Known As
Harry Longbaugh, S Morgenstern
Birth Place
Chicago, Illinois, USA
Born
August 12, 1931

Biography

One of the most celebrated writers to make a name for himself in both literature and film, William Goldman was born in Highland Park, Illinois in 1931. He would enroll at Oberlin College, where a creative writing class awakened his desire to become an author, and soon began submitting short stories for publication. Shortly after obtaining an MFA from Columbia University in 1956, Goldman ...

Family & Companions

Ilene Jones
Wife
Married on April 15, 1961; divorced in 1988.

Bibliography

"Which Lie Did I Tell?: More Adventures in the Screen Trade"
William Goldman, Pantheon (2000)
"The Big Picture: Who Killed Hollywood and Other Essays"
William Goldman, Applause Books (1999)
"Hype and Glory"
William Goldman, Random House (1990)
"Wait Till Next Year: The Story of a Season When What Should've Happened Didn't & What Could've Gone Wrong Did!"
William Goldman with Mike Lupica, Bantam Books (1988)

Notes

His sometime pseudonym of Harry Longbaugh is the real name of one of his favorite historical personalities, the Sundance Kid.

"If all you do is write screenplays, then it becomes denigrating to the soul." --William Goldman, quoted in David Thomson's "A Biographical Dictionary of Film"

Biography

One of the most celebrated writers to make a name for himself in both literature and film, William Goldman was born in Highland Park, Illinois in 1931. He would enroll at Oberlin College, where a creative writing class awakened his desire to become an author, and soon began submitting short stories for publication. Shortly after obtaining an MFA from Columbia University in 1956, Goldman published his first novel, the coming of age tale The Golden Temple. Soon he was off and running, publishing books like Soldier in the Rain and Boys and Girls Together. In 1965, Goldman was tapped to rewrite the script for the film "Masquerade" (1965), and soon, screenwriting became an integral component of his career. After his screenplay for "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" (1969) became a huge success, Goldman published the highly unusual and highly praised fantasy novel The Princess Bride in 1973. He would go on to publish the thriller Marathon Man, adapting it into a hit film in 1976 before penning another lauded script, adapting Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein's All the President's Men into a landmark feature film. Goldman's 1983 memoir Adventures in the Screen Trade would become a de facto guidebook for young writers in the industry, and his reputation only became stronger when he adapted The Princess Bride into a blockbuster hit in 1987. Goldman would concentrate on screenwriting for the following decades, notably adapting a number of Stephen King novels for the screen including Misery and Dreamcatcher. William Goldman died in November 2018. He was 87 years old.

Filmography

 

Cast (Feature Film)

Tales from the Script (2009)
Himself

Writer (Feature Film)

Shazam! (2019)
Writer (Uncredited)
Wild Card (2015)
Source Material
Wild Card (2015)
Screenplay
Dreamcatcher (2003)
Screenplay
Hearts in Atlantis (2001)
Screenplay
Jurassic Park III (2001)
Screenplay
The General's Daughter (1999)
Screenplay
Absolute Power (1997)
Screenplay
The Chamber (1996)
Screenwriter
The Ghost and the Darkness (1996)
Screenplay
Maverick (1994)
Screenplay
Chaplin (1992)
Screenplay
Memoirs Of An Invisible Man (1992)
Screenplay
Year Of The Comet (1992)
Screenplay
Misery (1990)
Screenplay
Heat (1987)
Screenplay
The Princess Bride (1987)
Screenwriter
Magic (1978)
Screenplay
A Bridge Too Far (1977)
Screenplay
Marathon Man (1976)
Screenplay
All The President's Men (1976)
Screenplay
The Stepford Wives (1975)
Screenplay
The Great Waldo Pepper (1975)
Screenplay
The Hot Rock (1972)
Screenwriter
Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969)
Writer
Harper (1966)
Screenwriter
Masquerade (1965)
Screenwriter

Special Thanks (Feature Film)

Under Suspicion (2000)
Special Thanks To
Fierce Creatures (1997)
Special Thanks To

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

Shazam! (2019)
Other
Shazam! (2019)
Screenplay (Uncredited)
Tales from the Script (2009)
Other
Extreme Measures (1996)
Consultant
Dolores Claiborne (1995)
Consultant
Malice (1993)
Consultant
A Few Good Men (1992)
Creative Consultant
The War of the Roses (1989)
Assistant
The Princess Bride (1987)
Source Material (From Novel)
Heat (1987)
Source Material (From Novel)
Butch and Sundance: The Early Days (1979)
Other
Magic (1978)
Source Material (From Novel)
Marathon Man (1976)
Source Material (From Novel)

Cast (Special)

The Human Face With John Cleese (2001)
History vs. Hollywood (2001)
Clint Eastwood: Out of the Shadows (2000)
Robert Redford: Hollywood Outlaw (2000)
Norman Jewison on Comedy in the 20th Century: Funny Is Money (1999)
NBA at 50 (1996)

Life Events

1952

Served as a corporal in the US Army

1957

Wrote first novel, "The Temple of Gold"

1961

First play produced on Broadway, "Blood, Sweat and Stanley Poole"; written with brother James

1962

With brother, co-wrote book for the ill-fated Broadway musical, "A Family Affair"; score by John Kander and James Goldman

1963

First novel to be turned into film, "Soldier in the Rain"

1965

First screenwriting credit: doctored script by "Americanizing" Michael Relph's screenplay for "Masquerade" when Cliff Robertson replaced Rex Harrison in the cast

1965

Hired to write first screenplay, a treatment of the teleplay and short novel "Flowers for Algernon" for Cliff Robertson; did not complete project (date approximate)

1966

Adapted the Ross MacDonald novel "The Moving Target" as "Harper", a vehicle for Paul Newman

1969

Established screenwriting credentials with an Academy Award-winning original script for "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid", directed by George Roy Hill and starring Newman and Robert Redford

1972

Scripted "The Hot Rock", adapted from Donald E Westlake's novel; film starred Redford

1975

Reteamed with director Hill and star Redford for the period comedy-drama "The Great Waldo Pepper"

1976

Wrote film adaptation of own thriller "Marathon Man"

1976

Won second Oscar for adaptation of "All the President's Men" for producer-star Redford

1977

First collaboration with Richard Attenborough, the WWII drama "A Bridge Too Far"

1978

Adapted his novel "Magic" for the screen; directed by Attenborough

1979

First work for TV, the CBS miniseries "Mr. Horn", starring David Carradine; originally written as a film vehicle for Redford and later Steve McQueen

1987

Adapted his novel, "The Princess Bride", to the screen; directed by Rob Reiner

1990

Wrote screenplay for "Misery", based on the Stephen King novel; film directed by Reiner and starred Kathy Bates in her Oscar-winning role

1992

First original screenplay in over 20-years "Year of the Comet"

1992

Collaborated on screenplay for Attenborough's biopic "Chaplin"

1994

Provided screenplay for Richard Donner's "Maverick"

1997

Wrote script for Clint Eastwood's "Absolute Power", adapted from the novel by David Baldacci

1999

Contributed to the screenplay adaptation of Nelson DeMille's best-seller "The General's Daughter"

2001

Penned the script for "Hearts in Atlantis", adapted from a Stephen King book

2003

Adapted another Stephen King novel, "Dreamcatcher," for director Lawrence Kasdan

2015

Adapted his novel <i>Heat</i> into a film starring Jason Statham.

Videos

Movie Clip

All The President's Men (1976) - Somebody Got To Her Bob Woodward (Robert Redford) and Carl Bernstein (Dustin Hoffman) in the Washington Post newsroom, decide to follow up on damning calls to the White House, in Alan J. Pakula's All The President's Men, 1976, from Woodward and Bernstein's book and William Goldman's screenplay.
All The President's Men (1976) - Possible Burglary The security guard is Frank Wills, the actual guy, who called in the Watergate burglary, staged by director Alan J. Pakula, Jack Warden, Martin Balsam and Dustin Hoffman also introduced, in the 1976 version of the Woodward & Bernstein book, All The President's Men.
Harper (1966) - Disciples For Supper William Goldman's script from Ross MacDonald's Lew Archer novel The Moving Target, L-A private eye Paul Newman (title character) and client's daughter Miranda (Pamela Tiffin) visit mountaintop guru Claude (Strother Martin), in Harper, 1966.
All The President's Men (1976) - You Haven't Got It Discussed but not seen until now, Jason Robards Jr. in his Academy Award-winning role as Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee, shoots down the first story he’s seen by Woodward and Bernstein (Robert Redford, Dustin Hoffman), Jack Warden as overruled Rosenfeld, in Alan J. Pakula’s All The President’s Men, 1976.
Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid (1969) - Guns Or Knives? As Butch (Paul Newman) and Sundance (Robert Redford) ride in, Harvey (Ted Cassidy) challenges for leadership of the "Hole In The Wall" gang early in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, 1969, from William Goldman's original screenplay.
Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid (1969) - They're Very Good! Butch (Paul Newman) and Sundance (Robert Redford) blow up the safe on "The Flyer" then are surprised by a band of gunmen pursuing them from a second train in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, 1969.
Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid (1969) - I Can't Swim Butch (Paul Newman) comes upon the only solution as he and Sundance (Robert Redford) are cornered on a cliff by the posse in a famous scene from Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, 1969.
Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid (1969) - Keep Goin', Teacher Lady First appearance by schoolteacher Etta Place (Katharine Ross), previously not mentioned in the story, finding Robert Redford (the second title character) lurking in her house, a provocative bit by screenwriter William Goldman and director George Roy Hill, in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, 1969.
Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid (1973) - How Good Are You? From director George Roy Hill’s rotogravure style opening, first scene for Robert Redford as one title character, joined by Paul Newman as the other, in a card game and challenged by another player (Paul Bryar), cleverness from writer William Goldman, in Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid, 1969.
Harper (1966) - You've Got Cops' Eyes Private eye Harper (Paul Newman) tracks down has-been heroin addicted singer Betty (Julie Harris) in an L-A night club, gets punished then rescued by Taggert (Robert Wagner), the eager private pilot for the man he's hunting, in Harper, 1966, from a Ross MacDonald novel.
Harper (1966) - A Poor Thing But Mine Own Detective Harper (Paul Newman, role based on Ross MacDonald's Lew Archer), visits new client Elaine Sampson (Lauren Bacall) in Harper, 1966, this scene shot at William Randolph Hearst's famous "Beverly House," in Beverly Hills.
Harper (1966) - I'm A Very Modern Type Fellow Shooting on location at William Randolph Hearst’s Beverly House, Paul Newman (private eye title character) meets the private pilot (Robert Wagner as Taggert) and daughter (Pamela Tiffin as Miranda) of the man he’s just been hired to find, in Harper, 1966, from a Ross MacDonald novel.

Trailer

Family

Maurice Clarence Goldman
Father
Businessman.
Marion Goldman
Mother
James Goldman
Brother
Screenwriter, playwright. Born on June 30, 1927; author of "The Lion in Winter" and the book for "Follies"; died on October 28, 1998 of a heart attack in NYC.
Jenny Rebecca Goldman
Daughter
Born c. 1962.
Susanna Goldman
Daughter
Born c. 1965.

Companions

Ilene Jones
Wife
Married on April 15, 1961; divorced in 1988.

Bibliography

"Which Lie Did I Tell?: More Adventures in the Screen Trade"
William Goldman, Pantheon (2000)
"The Big Picture: Who Killed Hollywood and Other Essays"
William Goldman, Applause Books (1999)
"Hype and Glory"
William Goldman, Random House (1990)
"Wait Till Next Year: The Story of a Season When What Should've Happened Didn't & What Could've Gone Wrong Did!"
William Goldman with Mike Lupica, Bantam Books (1988)
"Brothers"
William Golden, Warner Books (1987)
"Heat"
William Goldman, Warner Books (1985)
"The Color of Light"
William Goldman, Warner Books (1984)
"Adventures in the Screen Trade"
William Goldman, Warner Books (1983)
"The Silent Gondoliers"
S Morgenstern, Del Ray (1983)
"Control"
William Goldman, Delacorte (1982)
"Tinsel"
William Goldman, Delacorte (1979)
"William Goldman"
Richard Andersen (1979)
"William Goldman's Story of 'A Bridge Too Far'"
William Goldman, Dell (1977)
"Magic"
William Goldman, Delacorte (1976)
"The Great Waldo Pepper"
William Goldman, Dell (1975)
"Marathon Man"
William Goldman, Delacorte (1974)
"Wigger"
William Goldman, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1974)
"The Princess Bride"
William Goldman, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1973)
"Father's Day"
William Goldman, Harcourt, Brace & World (1970)
"Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid"
William Goldman, Corgi (1969)
"The Season: A Candid Look at Broadway"
William Goldman, Harcourt, Brace & World (1969)
"Boys and Girls Together"
William Goldman, Atheneum (1964)
"No Way to Treat a Lady"
William Goldman, Gold Medal (1964)
"The Thing of It Is ..."
William Goldman, Harcourt, Brace & World (1964)
"Soldier in the Rain"
William Goldman, Atheneum (1960)
"Your Turn to Curtsy, My Turn to Bow"
William Goldman, Doubleday (1958)
"The Temple of Gold"
William Goldman, Alfred A. Knopf (1957)

Notes

His sometime pseudonym of Harry Longbaugh is the real name of one of his favorite historical personalities, the Sundance Kid.

"If all you do is write screenplays, then it becomes denigrating to the soul." --William Goldman, quoted in David Thomson's "A Biographical Dictionary of Film"