Superman III


2h 5m 1983

Brief Synopsis

Superman battles a supercomputer and the evil businessman exploiting it.

Film Details

Also Known As
Stålmannen går på en krypto-nit
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Action
Adventure
Children
Sequel
Teens
Release Date
1983
Location
Alberta, Canada

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 5m

Synopsis

Gus Gorman, a computer whiz starts working for a conglomerate intent on world domination. Gorman is sent to Superman's hometown of Smallville to destroy Columbia's coffee crop by tampering with the weather satellite. In addition, Gorman unwittingly develops a hybrid of red Kryptonite, which turns Superman into a Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

Crew

Brian Ackland-snow

Art Director

Terry Ackland-snow

Art Director

Betty Adamson

Wardrobe Supervisor

Roy Alon

Stunts

Bob Bailin

Photography

Ken Baker

Assistant Director

Ken Barker

Stunts

Joy Bayley

Production Assistant

Dickey Beer

Stunts

Charles Bishop

Art Director

Martin Body

Photography

Martin Body

Other

Marc Boyle

Stunts

Maureen Campbell

Production Assistant

Pamela Carlton

Script Supervisor

Roy Charman

Sound Mixer

Colin Chilvers

Miniatures

Colin Chilvers

Special Effects

Chris Coles

Production Manager

Freddie Cooper

Camera Operator

Marshall Crenshaw

Song Performer

Sue Crosland

Stunts

Clive Curtis

Stunts

Bert Davey

Art Director

Richard Dimbleby

Other

David Docwra

Other

Michael Dryhurst

Production Supervisor

Tracey Eddon

Stunts

Gregg Elam

Stunts

Paul Engelen

Makeup

Jane Feinberg

Casting

Mike Fenton

Casting

Roy Field

Visual Effects Supervisor

Roy Field

Digital Effects Supervisor

Keith Forsey

Song

Stuart Freeborn

Makeup

David Garfath

Camera Operator

Ginger Gemmell

Camera Operator

Ron Goodman

Camera Operator

Martin Gutteridge

Special Effects

Richard Hammatt

Stunts

Keith Hamshere

Photography

Reg Harding

Stunts

Bob Harman

Special Effects

Peter Harman

Other

Peter Harman

Photography

John Harris

Photography

Evangeline Harrison

Costumes

Bob Hathaway

Music Editor

Bert Hearn

Props

Richard J Holland

Set Designer

Peter Hollywood

Associate Editor

Billy Horrigan

Stunts

Gerry Humphreys

Sound

Diane Jones

Wardrobe Supervisor

Ian C Kelly

Video

Chaka Khan

Song Performer

Les Kimber

Production Manager

David Lane

Other

Nick Laws

Assistant Director

Wendy Leech

Stunts

John Levenberger

Props

Archie Ludski

Sound Editor

Doug Mcleod

Unit Manager

Debbie Mcwilliams

Casting

Peter Melrose

Matte Painter

Wayne Michaels

Stunts

Ted Michell

Scenic Artist

Roger Miller

Song Performer

Giorgio Moroder

Song

Peter Murton

Production Designer

Chris Newman

Assistant Director

David Newman

Screenplay

Leslie Newman

Screenplay

Robin O'donoghue

Sound

Harry Oakes

Photography

John Palmer

Camera Operator

Sally Pardo

Production Assistant

Robert Paynter

Director Of Photography

Robert Paynter

Dp/Cinematographer

Zoran Perisic

Consultant

Rocky Phelan

Sound Editor

Michael Ploog

Production

Colin Prescot

Stunts

Denis Rich

Production

John Richards

Sound

Alexander Salkind

Executive Producer

Ilya Salkind

Executive Producer

Howard R Schuster

Consultant

Don Sharpe

Sound Editor

Joe Shuster

Characters As Source Material

Jerry Siegel

Characters As Source Material

Robert Simmonds

Associate Producer

Colin Skeaping

Stunts

Bobbie Smith

Hair

John Victor Smith

Editor

Paul Smith

Sound Editor

Pierre Spengler

Producer

Eddie Stacey

Stunts

Michael Steele

Unit Manager

Mark Stewart

Stunts

Charles Stoneham

Matte Painter

Dusty Symonds

Assistant Director

Ken Thorne

Music

Terry Walsh

Stunts

Brian Warner

Special Effects

Paul Weston

Stunt Coordinator

Joan White

Hair

John Williams

Music

Vincent Winter

Production Manager

Marc Wolff

Helicopter Pilot

Trudy Work

Production Assistant

Keith Young

Assistant Director

Peter Young

Set Decorator

Film Details

Also Known As
Stålmannen går på en krypto-nit
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Action
Adventure
Children
Sequel
Teens
Release Date
1983
Location
Alberta, Canada

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 5m

Articles

Richard Pryor (1940-2005)


The scathing, brilliantly insightful African-American comic who proved himself on many occasions to be a highly competent screen actor, died of a heart attack on November 10 at his Encino, California home. He was 65. He had been reclusive for years after he publicly announced he was suffering from multiple sclerosis in 1992.

He was born Richard Thomas Pryor III on December 1, 1940 in Peoria, Illinois. By all accounts, his childhood was a difficult one. His mother was a prostitute and his grandmother ran a brothel. His father was rarely around and when he was, he would physically abuse him. From a young age, Pryor knew that humor was his weapon of choice to cut through all the swath he came across and would confront in his life.

After high school, he enlisted in the Army for a two-year stint (1958-60). When he was discharged (honorably!) he concentrated on stand-up comedy and worked in a series of nightclubs before relocating to New York City in 1963. In 1964, he made his television debut when he was given a slot on the variety program On Broadway Tonight. His routine, though hardly the groundbreaking material we would witness in later years, was very well received, and in the late '60s Pryor found more television work: Toast of the Town, The Wild Wild West, The Mod Squad ; and was cast in a two movies: The Busy Body (1967) with Sid Caesar; and Wild in the Streets (1968) a cartoonish political fantasy about the internment of all American citizens over 30.

Pryor's career really didn't ignite until the '70s. His stand up act became raunchier and more politically motivated as he touched on issued of race, failed relationships, drug addiction, and street crimes. His movie roles became far more captivating in the process: the piano man in Lady Sings the Blues (1972); as a wise-talking hustler in a pair of slick urban thrillers: The Mack (1973) and Uptown Saturday Night (1974); the gregarious Daddy Rich in Car Wash; his first pairing with Gene Wilder as Grover, the car thief who helps stops a runaway train in his first real box office smash Silver Streak (both 1976); and for many critics, his finest dramatic performance as a factory worker on the edge of depression in Paul Schrader's excellent working class drama Blue Collar (1978).

On a personal level, his drug dependency problem worsened, and on June 9, 1980, near tragedy struck when he caught fire while free-basing cocaine. Pryor later admitted that the incident, was, in fact, a suicide attempt, and that his management company created the lie for the press in hopes of protecting him. Fortunately, Pryor had three films in the can that all achieved some level of financial success soon after his setback: another pairing with Gene Wilder in the prison comedy Stir Crazy (1980); a blisteringly funny cameo as God who flips off Andy Kaufman in the warped religious satire In God We Tru$t (1980); an a ex-con helping a social worker (Cicely Tyson) with her foster charges in Bustin' Loose (1981). He capped his recovery with Live on the Sunset Strip (1982), a first-rate documentation of the comic's genius performed in front of a raucous live audience.

In 1983, Pryor signed a $40 million, five-year contract with Columbia Pictures. For many fans and critics, this was the beginning of his downslide. His next few films: The Toy, Superman III (both 1983), and Brewster's Millions (1985) were just tiresome, mediocre comedies. Jo Jo Dancer, Your Life is Calling (1986), was his only attempt at producing, directing, and acting, and the film, which was an ambitious autobiographical account of a his life and career, was a box-office disappointment. He spent the remainder of the '80s in middling fare: Condition Critical (1987), Moving; a third pairing with Gene Wilder in See No Evil, Hear No Evil; and his only teaming with Eddie Murphy in Harlem Nights (1989).

In 1986, Pryor was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, a degenerative disease of the nervous system that curtailed both his personal appearances and his gift for physical comedy in his latter films. By the '90s, little was seen of Pryor, but in 1995, he made a courageous comeback on television when he guest starred on Chicago Hope as an embittered multiple sclerosis patient. His performance earned him an Emmy nomination and he was cast in a few more films: Mad Dog Time (1996), Lost Highway (1997), but his physical ailments prohibited him from performing on a regular basis. In 1998, The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington gave Pryor the first Mark Twain Prize for humor. It was fitting tribute for a man who had given so much honesty and innovation in the field of comedy. Pryor is survived by his wife, Jennifer Lee; his sons Richard and Steven; and daughters Elizabeth, Rain and Renee.

by Michael T. Toole
Richard Pryor (1940-2005)

Richard Pryor (1940-2005)

The scathing, brilliantly insightful African-American comic who proved himself on many occasions to be a highly competent screen actor, died of a heart attack on November 10 at his Encino, California home. He was 65. He had been reclusive for years after he publicly announced he was suffering from multiple sclerosis in 1992. He was born Richard Thomas Pryor III on December 1, 1940 in Peoria, Illinois. By all accounts, his childhood was a difficult one. His mother was a prostitute and his grandmother ran a brothel. His father was rarely around and when he was, he would physically abuse him. From a young age, Pryor knew that humor was his weapon of choice to cut through all the swath he came across and would confront in his life. After high school, he enlisted in the Army for a two-year stint (1958-60). When he was discharged (honorably!) he concentrated on stand-up comedy and worked in a series of nightclubs before relocating to New York City in 1963. In 1964, he made his television debut when he was given a slot on the variety program On Broadway Tonight. His routine, though hardly the groundbreaking material we would witness in later years, was very well received, and in the late '60s Pryor found more television work: Toast of the Town, The Wild Wild West, The Mod Squad ; and was cast in a two movies: The Busy Body (1967) with Sid Caesar; and Wild in the Streets (1968) a cartoonish political fantasy about the internment of all American citizens over 30. Pryor's career really didn't ignite until the '70s. His stand up act became raunchier and more politically motivated as he touched on issued of race, failed relationships, drug addiction, and street crimes. His movie roles became far more captivating in the process: the piano man in Lady Sings the Blues (1972); as a wise-talking hustler in a pair of slick urban thrillers: The Mack (1973) and Uptown Saturday Night (1974); the gregarious Daddy Rich in Car Wash; his first pairing with Gene Wilder as Grover, the car thief who helps stops a runaway train in his first real box office smash Silver Streak (both 1976); and for many critics, his finest dramatic performance as a factory worker on the edge of depression in Paul Schrader's excellent working class drama Blue Collar (1978). On a personal level, his drug dependency problem worsened, and on June 9, 1980, near tragedy struck when he caught fire while free-basing cocaine. Pryor later admitted that the incident, was, in fact, a suicide attempt, and that his management company created the lie for the press in hopes of protecting him. Fortunately, Pryor had three films in the can that all achieved some level of financial success soon after his setback: another pairing with Gene Wilder in the prison comedy Stir Crazy (1980); a blisteringly funny cameo as God who flips off Andy Kaufman in the warped religious satire In God We Tru$t (1980); an a ex-con helping a social worker (Cicely Tyson) with her foster charges in Bustin' Loose (1981). He capped his recovery with Live on the Sunset Strip (1982), a first-rate documentation of the comic's genius performed in front of a raucous live audience. In 1983, Pryor signed a $40 million, five-year contract with Columbia Pictures. For many fans and critics, this was the beginning of his downslide. His next few films: The Toy, Superman III (both 1983), and Brewster's Millions (1985) were just tiresome, mediocre comedies. Jo Jo Dancer, Your Life is Calling (1986), was his only attempt at producing, directing, and acting, and the film, which was an ambitious autobiographical account of a his life and career, was a box-office disappointment. He spent the remainder of the '80s in middling fare: Condition Critical (1987), Moving; a third pairing with Gene Wilder in See No Evil, Hear No Evil; and his only teaming with Eddie Murphy in Harlem Nights (1989). In 1986, Pryor was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, a degenerative disease of the nervous system that curtailed both his personal appearances and his gift for physical comedy in his latter films. By the '90s, little was seen of Pryor, but in 1995, he made a courageous comeback on television when he guest starred on Chicago Hope as an embittered multiple sclerosis patient. His performance earned him an Emmy nomination and he was cast in a few more films: Mad Dog Time (1996), Lost Highway (1997), but his physical ailments prohibited him from performing on a regular basis. In 1998, The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington gave Pryor the first Mark Twain Prize for humor. It was fitting tribute for a man who had given so much honesty and innovation in the field of comedy. Pryor is survived by his wife, Jennifer Lee; his sons Richard and Steven; and daughters Elizabeth, Rain and Renee. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer June 17, 1983

Released in United States on Video February 1, 1989

During the making of "Superman" (1978) Richard Lester acted as a liaison between the director Richard Donner and the producers after they had disagreements.

Released in United States Summer June 17, 1983

Released in United States on Video February 1, 1989