Death Wish 3


1h 30m 1985

Brief Synopsis

Vigilante Paul Kersey returns to New York to avenge the crimes of street thugs.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1985
Distribution Company
Cannon Releasing

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Synopsis

Vigilante Paul Kersey returns to New York to avenge the crimes of street thugs.

Crew

Ron Abrams

Hair

Denise Andres

Wardrobe Assistant

Alan Annand

Camera Assistant

Heidi August

Production Auditor

Derek Ball

Sound

Chris Barnes

Executive Editor

Ron Beck

Wardrobe Supervisor

Sam Bender

Gaffer

Marc Boyle

Stunt Coordinator

Helen Butler

Wardrobe

Mike Campbell

Sound Editor

Eva Carbrera

Script Supervisor

Valerie Chamberlain

Production Assistant

John Chisholm

Property Master

Jim Chory

Assistant Director

Malcolm J Christopher

Production Supervisor

Ron Coleman

Construction Manager

Tim Condren

Stunts

George Lane Cooper

Stunts

Jackie Cooper

Stunts

Michael Curry

Other

Michael Curry

Construction Coordinator

William Daly

Sound

Thomas Delmar

Stunts

John Dimond

Gaffer

Richard Dodd

Sound

Steven Drellich

Camera Assistant

Tracey Eddon

Stunts

Michael Edmonds

Screenplay

Stuart Epps

Sound

John Evans

Special Effects

David Farrell

Photography

Peggy Farrell

Costume Designer

Elaine Ford

Stunts

Ray Ford

Stunts

Terry Forrestal

Stunts

John Fraser

Assistant

Brian Garfield

Characters As Source Material

Nic Gaster

Sound Editor

Alan Gates

Dolly Grip

Marcia Gay

Assistant Director

Yoram Globus

Producer

Menahem Golan

Producer

Gene Hartline

Stunts

Paul Heasman

Stunts

Alan Hopkins

Assistant Director

Don Jakoby

Screenplay

Jazzer Jeyes

Stunts

Roberto Jimenez

Best Boy

Michael J Kagan

Associate Producer

Michael Kara

Casting

Karen Kates

Props

Richard Kerekes

Dolly Grip

Alan Killick

Music Editor

Denis Kington

Camera Operator

Steve Kirshoff

Special Effects

Tony Lenny

Sound Editor

Mitch Lillian

Key Grip

Brian Lintern

Sound Editor

Brian Lofthouse

Property Master

Sue Love

Hair

Harry Madsen

Stunt Coordinator

George Manasse

Unit Production Manager

Jody Milano

Production Coordinator

Lex Milloy

Stunts

Richard Mills

Makeup

David Minty

Art Director

David Moon

Scenic Artist

Wildey Moore

Technical Advisor

Mike Moran

Music

Mike Moran

Music Arranger

Mike Moran

Music Conductor

Peter Movias

Production Designer

Peter Mullins

Production Designer

Richard W Murphy

Boom Operator

Ken Nightingall

Boom Operator

Hugh O'donnell

Location Manager

Susan Oldroyd

Script Supervisor

Alan Oliney

Stunts

Ernie Orsatti

Stunt Coordinator

Jimmy Page

Music

Edward J Pei

Camera Assistant

John Poyner

Sound Editor

Ron Purdie

Production Supervisor

Ron Purdie

Assistant Director

Gretchen Rau

Set Decorator

Scott Rosenstock

On-Set Dresser

Mike Russo

Stunts

John Seakwood

Photography

Nigel Seal

Camera Assistant

Rick Seaman

Stunts

Hamid Shams

Camera Assistant

Pattie Smith

Hair

Stan Smith

Sound Editor

Stuart St Paul

Stunts

John Stanier

Director Of Photography

Ron C Stone

Property Master

Hugh Strain

Sound

Michael F. Tadross

Unit Manager Assistant

Robin Tarsnane

Set Decorator

James A Taylor

Art Director

Rocky Taylor

Stunts

Janet Tebrooke

Wardrobe

Tip Tipping

Stunts

Daniel L Turrett

Camera Operator

Robert Wagner

Camera Operator

Gery Walker

Casting

Sue Wall

Production Accountant

Carla White

Makeup

Steve Whyment

Stunts

Connie Willis

Script Supervisor

Zachary Winestine

Camera Assistant

Michael Winner

Editor

Michael Winner

Producer

Michael Woollard

Best Boy

David Wynn-jones

Camera Operator

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1985
Distribution Company
Cannon Releasing

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Articles

TCM Remembers Charles Bronson - Sept. 13th - TCM Remembers Charles Bronson this Saturday, Sept. 13th 2003.


Turner Classic Movies will honor the passing of Hollywood action star Charles Bronson on Saturday, Sept. 13, with a four-film tribute.

After years of playing supporting roles in numerous Western, action and war films, including THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN (1960, 8 p.m.) and THE DIRTY DOZEN (1967, 1:15 a.m.), Bronson finally achieved worldwide stardom as a leading man during the late 1960s and early 1970s. TCM's tribute will also include THE GREAT ESCAPE (1963, 10:15 p.m.), Bronson's second teaming with Steve McQueen and James Coburn, and will conclude with FROM NOON TILL THREE (1976, 4 a.m.), co-starring Jill Ireland.

TCM will alter it's prime-time schedule this Saturday, Sept. 13th. The following changes will take place:

8:00 PM - The Magnificent Seven (1960)
10:15 PM - The Great Escape (1963)
1:15 AM - The Dirty Dozen (1967)
4:00 AM - From Noon Till Three (1976)

Charles Bronson, 1921-2003

Charles Bronson, the tough, stony-faced actor who was one of the most recognizable action heroes in cinema, died on August 30 in Los Angeles from complications from pneumonia. He was 81.

He was born Charles Buchinsky on November 3, 1921 in Ehrenfeld, Pennsylvania, one of fifteen children born to Lithuanian immigrant parents. Although he was the only child to have graduated high school, he worked in the coalmines to support his family until he joined the army to serve as a tail gunner during World War II. He used his money from the G.I. Bill to study art in Philadelphia, but while working as a set designer for a Philadelphia theater troupe, he landed a few small roles in some productions and immediately found acting to be the craft for him.

Bronson took his new career turn seriously, moved to California, and enrolled for acting classes at The Pasadena Playhouse. An instructor there recommended him to director Henry Hathaway for a movie role and the result was his debut in Hathaway's You're in the Navy Now (1951). He secured more bit parts in films like John Sturges' drama The People Against O'Hara (1951), and Joseph Newman's Bloodhounds of Broadway (1952). More substantial roles came in George Cukor's Pat and Mike (1952, where he is beaten up by Katharine Hepburn!); Andre de Toth's classic 3-D thriller House of Wax (1953, as Vincent Price's mute assistant, Igor); and De Toth's fine low-budget noir Crime Wave (1954).

Despite his formidable presence, his leads were confined to a string of B pictures like Gene Fowler's Gang War; and Roger Corman's tight Machine Gun Kelly (both 1958). Following his own television series, Man With a Camera (1958-60), Bronson had his first taste of film stardom when director Sturges casted him as Bernardo, one of the The Magnificent Seven (1960). Bronson displayed a powerful charisma, comfortably holding his own in a high-powered cast that included Yul Brynner and Steve McQueen. A few more solid roles followed in Sturges' The Great Escape (1963), and Robert Aldrich's classic war picture The Dirty Dozen (1967), before Bronson made the decision to follow the European trail of other American actors like Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cleef. It was there that his hard, taciturn screen personae exploded in full force. In 1968 alone, he had four hit films: Henri Verneuil's Guns for San Sebastian, Buzz Kulik's Villa Rides, Jean Herman's Adieu l'ami which was a smash in France; and the classic Sergio Leone spaghetti Western Once Upon a Time in the West.

These films established Bronson as a huge box-office draw in Europe, and with some more stylish hits like Rene Clement's Rider on the Rain (1969), and Terence Young's Cold Sweat (1971) he soon became one of the most popular film stars in the world. It wasn't easy for Bronson to translate that success back in his homeland. In fact, his first few films on his return stateside: Michael Winners' Chato's Land, and The Mechanic (both 1972), and Richard Fleischer's Mr. Majestyk (1973), were surprisingly routine pictures. It wasn't until he collaborated with Winner again for the controversial Death Wish (1974), an urban revenge thriller about an architect who turns vigilante when his wife and daughter are raped, did he notch his first stateside hit. The next few years would be a fruitful period for Bronson as he rode on a wave of fine films and commercial success: a depression era streetfighter in Walter Hill's terrific, if underrated Hard Times (1975); Frank Gilroy's charming offbeat black comedy From Noon Till Three (1976, the best of many teamings with his second wife, Jill Ireland); Tom Gries tense Breakheart Pass; and Don Siegel's cold-war thriller Telefon (1977).

Sadly, Bronson could not keep up the momentum of good movies, and by the '80s he was starring in a string of forgettable films like Ten to Midnight (1983), The Evil That Men Do (1984), and Murphy's Law (1986, all directed by J. Lee Thompson). A notable exception to all that tripe was John Mackenzie's fine telefilm Act of Vengeance (1986), where he earned critical acclaim in the role of United Mine Workers official Jack Yablonski. Although he more or less fell into semi-retirement in the '90s, his performances in Sean Penn's The Indian Runner (1991); and the title role of Michael Anderson's The Sea Wolf (1993) proved to many that Bronson had the makings of a fine character actor. He was married to actress Jill Ireland from 1968 until her death from breast cancer in 1990. He is survived by his third wife Kim Weeks, six children, and two grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Tcm Remembers Charles Bronson - Sept. 13Th - Tcm Remembers Charles Bronson This Saturday, Sept. 13Th 2003.

TCM Remembers Charles Bronson - Sept. 13th - TCM Remembers Charles Bronson this Saturday, Sept. 13th 2003.

Turner Classic Movies will honor the passing of Hollywood action star Charles Bronson on Saturday, Sept. 13, with a four-film tribute. After years of playing supporting roles in numerous Western, action and war films, including THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN (1960, 8 p.m.) and THE DIRTY DOZEN (1967, 1:15 a.m.), Bronson finally achieved worldwide stardom as a leading man during the late 1960s and early 1970s. TCM's tribute will also include THE GREAT ESCAPE (1963, 10:15 p.m.), Bronson's second teaming with Steve McQueen and James Coburn, and will conclude with FROM NOON TILL THREE (1976, 4 a.m.), co-starring Jill Ireland. TCM will alter it's prime-time schedule this Saturday, Sept. 13th. The following changes will take place: 8:00 PM - The Magnificent Seven (1960) 10:15 PM - The Great Escape (1963) 1:15 AM - The Dirty Dozen (1967) 4:00 AM - From Noon Till Three (1976) Charles Bronson, 1921-2003 Charles Bronson, the tough, stony-faced actor who was one of the most recognizable action heroes in cinema, died on August 30 in Los Angeles from complications from pneumonia. He was 81. He was born Charles Buchinsky on November 3, 1921 in Ehrenfeld, Pennsylvania, one of fifteen children born to Lithuanian immigrant parents. Although he was the only child to have graduated high school, he worked in the coalmines to support his family until he joined the army to serve as a tail gunner during World War II. He used his money from the G.I. Bill to study art in Philadelphia, but while working as a set designer for a Philadelphia theater troupe, he landed a few small roles in some productions and immediately found acting to be the craft for him. Bronson took his new career turn seriously, moved to California, and enrolled for acting classes at The Pasadena Playhouse. An instructor there recommended him to director Henry Hathaway for a movie role and the result was his debut in Hathaway's You're in the Navy Now (1951). He secured more bit parts in films like John Sturges' drama The People Against O'Hara (1951), and Joseph Newman's Bloodhounds of Broadway (1952). More substantial roles came in George Cukor's Pat and Mike (1952, where he is beaten up by Katharine Hepburn!); Andre de Toth's classic 3-D thriller House of Wax (1953, as Vincent Price's mute assistant, Igor); and De Toth's fine low-budget noir Crime Wave (1954). Despite his formidable presence, his leads were confined to a string of B pictures like Gene Fowler's Gang War; and Roger Corman's tight Machine Gun Kelly (both 1958). Following his own television series, Man With a Camera (1958-60), Bronson had his first taste of film stardom when director Sturges casted him as Bernardo, one of the The Magnificent Seven (1960). Bronson displayed a powerful charisma, comfortably holding his own in a high-powered cast that included Yul Brynner and Steve McQueen. A few more solid roles followed in Sturges' The Great Escape (1963), and Robert Aldrich's classic war picture The Dirty Dozen (1967), before Bronson made the decision to follow the European trail of other American actors like Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cleef. It was there that his hard, taciturn screen personae exploded in full force. In 1968 alone, he had four hit films: Henri Verneuil's Guns for San Sebastian, Buzz Kulik's Villa Rides, Jean Herman's Adieu l'ami which was a smash in France; and the classic Sergio Leone spaghetti Western Once Upon a Time in the West. These films established Bronson as a huge box-office draw in Europe, and with some more stylish hits like Rene Clement's Rider on the Rain (1969), and Terence Young's Cold Sweat (1971) he soon became one of the most popular film stars in the world. It wasn't easy for Bronson to translate that success back in his homeland. In fact, his first few films on his return stateside: Michael Winners' Chato's Land, and The Mechanic (both 1972), and Richard Fleischer's Mr. Majestyk (1973), were surprisingly routine pictures. It wasn't until he collaborated with Winner again for the controversial Death Wish (1974), an urban revenge thriller about an architect who turns vigilante when his wife and daughter are raped, did he notch his first stateside hit. The next few years would be a fruitful period for Bronson as he rode on a wave of fine films and commercial success: a depression era streetfighter in Walter Hill's terrific, if underrated Hard Times (1975); Frank Gilroy's charming offbeat black comedy From Noon Till Three (1976, the best of many teamings with his second wife, Jill Ireland); Tom Gries tense Breakheart Pass; and Don Siegel's cold-war thriller Telefon (1977). Sadly, Bronson could not keep up the momentum of good movies, and by the '80s he was starring in a string of forgettable films like Ten to Midnight (1983), The Evil That Men Do (1984), and Murphy's Law (1986, all directed by J. Lee Thompson). A notable exception to all that tripe was John Mackenzie's fine telefilm Act of Vengeance (1986), where he earned critical acclaim in the role of United Mine Workers official Jack Yablonski. Although he more or less fell into semi-retirement in the '90s, his performances in Sean Penn's The Indian Runner (1991); and the title role of Michael Anderson's The Sea Wolf (1993) proved to many that Bronson had the makings of a fine character actor. He was married to actress Jill Ireland from 1968 until her death from breast cancer in 1990. He is survived by his third wife Kim Weeks, six children, and two grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 2014

Released in United States Fall November 1, 1985

Released in United States October 25, 1985

Began shooting April 22, 1985.

Released in United States 2014 (Official Selection)

Released in United States October 25, 1985

Released worldwide November 1, 1985.

Released in United States Fall November 1, 1985