Brighton Beach Memoirs


1h 48m 1986

Brief Synopsis

Jonathan Silverman, Blythe Danner, Judith Ivey, Bob Dishy, Fyvush Finkel, Brian Drillinger, Stacey Glick. This first entry in Neil Simon's heavily autographical stage series (which continued with "Biloxi Blues," "Broadway Bound," and "Laughter on the 23rd Floor") gets the film treatment from veteran stage and screen director Gene Saks (who won a Tony for directing the show on Broadway). The story has Simon's teenaged alter ego, Eugene Jerome, obsessing over sex and baseball while living with his extended family in 1930s-era Brighton Beach, New York.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Adaptation
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
1986
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures
Location
Ridgewood, Queens, New York City, New York, USA; Brighton Beach, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, USA; Kaufman Astoria Studios, Astoria, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 48m

Synopsis

Jonathan Silverman, Blythe Danner, Judith Ivey, Bob Dishy, Fyvush Finkel, Brian Drillinger, Stacey Glick. This first entry in Neil Simon's heavily autographical stage series (which continued with "Biloxi Blues," "Broadway Bound," and "Laughter on the 23rd Floor") gets the film treatment from veteran stage and screen director Gene Saks (who won a Tony for directing the show on Broadway). The story has Simon's teenaged alter ego, Eugene Jerome, obsessing over sex and baseball while living with his extended family in 1930s-era Brighton Beach, New York.

Crew

Barbara Ackerman

Assistant

Gina R. Alfano

Sound Editor

Joseph Aulisi

Costume Designer

John Bailey

Director Of Photography

Louis Barlia

Camera Operator

Donah Bassett

Negative Cutting

David Berger

Original Music

Bj Bjorkman

Script Supervisor

Arthur Bloom

Sound

Phil Bodner

Other

Bob Brown

Assistant Camera Operator

Jack Brown

Assistant Camera Operator

Thomas Buckman

Transportation Co-Captain

Joseph M Caracciolo

Property Master

Joseph M Caracciolo

Associate Producer

Joseph M Caracciolo

Unit Production Manager

Joe Caroff

Titles

Lou Cerborino

Sound Editor

Emile Charlap

Music Contractor

David Chasman

Executive Producer

Roberta Christy

Wardrobe Assistant

Steve Clayton

Song Performer

Randall Coleman

Sound Editor

Carla Corwin

Production Assistant

Joe Coscia

Hair

Al Craine

Wardrobe Supervisor

Louis D'esposito

Assistant Director

Christopher Dedrick

Original Music

George Detitta Jr.

Set Decorator

Dan Ditolla

Props

James E Dolan

Gaffer

James P. Dolan

Best Boy

Paul Eads

Art Director

Marsha L Eck

Assistant

Fleet Emerson

Assistant

William Farley

Hair

Michael Farrow

Music

Sylvia Fay

Casting

Howard Feuer

Casting

Jonathan Filley

Location Coordinator

Jimmy Finnerty

Key Grip

Tom Fleischman

Sound

James Giblin

Transportation Captain

Robert Girolami

Assistant Director

Mack Gordon

Song

Barry Halper

Other

Larry Helman

Apprentice

Lindsey Hicks

Editorial Assistant

Martha Huntley

Assistant Editor

Kenton Jakub

Sound Editor

Gary Jones

Set Decorator

Dusty Klatt

On-Set Dresser

Sonny Kompanek

Original Music

Ernesto Lecuona

Song

Carol Littleton

Editor

Carmen Lombardo

Song

Dennis Maitland

Boom Operator

Jennie Maresca

Auditor

Brian Mcaward

Camera Trainee

John B Mcdonnell

Props

Kathleen Mcgill

Production Auditor

Marilyn Modlin

Assistant

Bill Molloy

Assistant

E Nicholas Mortimer

Production Assistant

Laurie Mullen

Sound Editor

Rocco Musacchia

Location Assistant

Ray Musiker

Song

Chris Newman

Sound Mixer

Jennifer Nichols

Wardrobe Supervisor

Charles O'flynn

Song

Lisa Olin

Production Assistant

Richie Patrick

Production Assistant

George Patsos

Grip

Jane Paul

Assistant Director

Bruce Pearson

Color Timer

Carlos Quiles

Construction Coordinator

Lyndell Quiyou

Hair

Jane Raab

Production Coordinator

Harry Revel

Song

Dana Robin

Location Assistant

Mindy Roffman

Assistant Art Director

John Saffir

Production Assistant

Matthew Saks

Production Assistant

Walter G Samuels

Song

Jill Savitt

Assistant Editor

Maurice Schell

Sound Editor

Suzanne Schwarzer

Wardrobe Assistant

Mickey Scott

Makeup

Jennifer W Shore

Assistant Production Coordinator

Neil Simon

Screenplay

Neil Simon

Play As Source Material

James Skotchdopole

Assistant Director

Karen Sloe

Art Assistant

Michael Small

Music

James Sorice

Other

Ray Stark

Producer

Guy Tanno

Wardrobe Supervisor

Wynn Thomas

Assistant Art Director

David A Ticotin

Location Assistant

Greg Torre

Production Assistant

Brunilda Torres

Sound Editor

Glen Trotiner

Dga Trainee

Matilde Valera

Assistant

Tom Warren

Assistant Art Director

Joshua Weiner

Photography

Allen Weisinger

Makeup

Leonard Whitcup

Song

Bob Wilber

Original Music

Joseph P Williams

Grip

Kevin P Williams

Grip

Stuart Wurtzel

Production Designer

Film Details

MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Adaptation
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
1986
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures
Location
Ridgewood, Queens, New York City, New York, USA; Brighton Beach, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, USA; Kaufman Astoria Studios, Astoria, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 48m

Articles

Ray Stark (1915-2004)


Ray Stark, the celebrated Hollywood producer who opened the world for Barbra Streisand in Funny Girl (1968), and was a recipient of the distinguished Irving G. Thalberg Award from the Academy of Arts and Sciences for his services to the movie industry, died of natural causes on January 17th in Los Angeles. He was 88.

Born on October 3, 1915 in New York City, Stark was educated at Rutgers University and New York University Law School. After graduation, he started his entertainment career selling radio scripts before he became a literary agent for such notable writers as Ben Hecht, Thomas P. Costain, and Raymond Chandler. After serving in the Navy during World War II, Stark - who had show-business connections through his mother-in-law, Broadway legend Fanny Brice - eventually became a top Hollywood agent at Famous Artists, where he represented such stars as Marilyn Monroe, William Holden, Kirk Douglas, and Lana Turner.

By 1957, Stark was hungry to develop more of a taste in the film business, so he formed a partnership with fellow producer Elliott Hyman to create the independent movie firm, Seven Arts Productions. Stark's first film production credit was the popular drama The World of Suzie Wong (1960) starring William Holden and Nancy Kwan; and he followed that up with an adaptation of Tennessee Williams' superb Night of the Iguana (1964) with Richard Burton, Deborah Kerr and Ava Gardner.

Around this time, Stark had the ambition to produce a musical based on the life of his late mother-in-law, and produced his first Broadway musical - Funny Girl. The musical opened on March 24, 1964 and made Barbra Streisand the toast of the Great White Way. Eventually, Stark would make the film adaptation four years later, and Streisand would win the Academy Award for Best Actress. Stark would also arrange a contract with Streisand to do three more movies for him within the next 10 years that still prove to be the most interesting of her career: the hilarious sex farce The Owl and the Pussycat (1970) with George Segal; the romantic drama The Way We Were (1973) with Robert Redford; and the sequel to her film debut Funny Lady (1975) co-starring Omar Sharif.

Stark also delivered another Broadway luminary to the movie going masses when he brought a string of well-acted, Neil Simon comedies to the silver screen, most notably: The Goodbye Girl (1977) with Marsha Mason and Richard Dreyfuss (Oscar winner, Best Actor); The Sunshine Boys (1975) with Walter Matthau and George Burns (Oscar winner, Best Supporting Actor); California Suite (1978) with Alan Alda, Michael Caine, and Dame Maggie Smith (Oscar winner, Best Supporting Actress); the nostalgic Brighton Beach Memoirs (1986) with Blythe Danner; and Biloxi Blues (1988) with Matthew Broderick. He also produced Steel Magnolias (1989), with an ensemble cast that introduced audiences to a radiantly young Julia Roberts. In television, Stark won an Emmy award for the HBO's telefilm Barbarians at the Gate (1993). His last credit as a producer (at age 84) was the Harrison Ford picture Random Hearts (1999).

Although he never won an Academy Award, Stark earned the most prestigious Irving G. Thalberg Award in 1980 and the David O. Selznick Lifetime Achievement Award from the Producers Guild of America in 1999. He is survived by his daughter, Wendy, and granddaughter, Allison.

by Michael T. Toole
Ray Stark (1915-2004)

Ray Stark (1915-2004)

Ray Stark, the celebrated Hollywood producer who opened the world for Barbra Streisand in Funny Girl (1968), and was a recipient of the distinguished Irving G. Thalberg Award from the Academy of Arts and Sciences for his services to the movie industry, died of natural causes on January 17th in Los Angeles. He was 88. Born on October 3, 1915 in New York City, Stark was educated at Rutgers University and New York University Law School. After graduation, he started his entertainment career selling radio scripts before he became a literary agent for such notable writers as Ben Hecht, Thomas P. Costain, and Raymond Chandler. After serving in the Navy during World War II, Stark - who had show-business connections through his mother-in-law, Broadway legend Fanny Brice - eventually became a top Hollywood agent at Famous Artists, where he represented such stars as Marilyn Monroe, William Holden, Kirk Douglas, and Lana Turner. By 1957, Stark was hungry to develop more of a taste in the film business, so he formed a partnership with fellow producer Elliott Hyman to create the independent movie firm, Seven Arts Productions. Stark's first film production credit was the popular drama The World of Suzie Wong (1960) starring William Holden and Nancy Kwan; and he followed that up with an adaptation of Tennessee Williams' superb Night of the Iguana (1964) with Richard Burton, Deborah Kerr and Ava Gardner. Around this time, Stark had the ambition to produce a musical based on the life of his late mother-in-law, and produced his first Broadway musical - Funny Girl. The musical opened on March 24, 1964 and made Barbra Streisand the toast of the Great White Way. Eventually, Stark would make the film adaptation four years later, and Streisand would win the Academy Award for Best Actress. Stark would also arrange a contract with Streisand to do three more movies for him within the next 10 years that still prove to be the most interesting of her career: the hilarious sex farce The Owl and the Pussycat (1970) with George Segal; the romantic drama The Way We Were (1973) with Robert Redford; and the sequel to her film debut Funny Lady (1975) co-starring Omar Sharif. Stark also delivered another Broadway luminary to the movie going masses when he brought a string of well-acted, Neil Simon comedies to the silver screen, most notably: The Goodbye Girl (1977) with Marsha Mason and Richard Dreyfuss (Oscar winner, Best Actor); The Sunshine Boys (1975) with Walter Matthau and George Burns (Oscar winner, Best Supporting Actor); California Suite (1978) with Alan Alda, Michael Caine, and Dame Maggie Smith (Oscar winner, Best Supporting Actress); the nostalgic Brighton Beach Memoirs (1986) with Blythe Danner; and Biloxi Blues (1988) with Matthew Broderick. He also produced Steel Magnolias (1989), with an ensemble cast that introduced audiences to a radiantly young Julia Roberts. In television, Stark won an Emmy award for the HBO's telefilm Barbarians at the Gate (1993). His last credit as a producer (at age 84) was the Harrison Ford picture Random Hearts (1999). Although he never won an Academy Award, Stark earned the most prestigious Irving G. Thalberg Award in 1980 and the David O. Selznick Lifetime Achievement Award from the Producers Guild of America in 1999. He is survived by his daughter, Wendy, and granddaughter, Allison. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter December 25, 1986

Began shooting September 9, 1985.

Completed shooting December 1985.

The original Broadway production of "Brighton Beach Memoirs" was produced by Emanuel Azenberg, Wayne M. Rogers and Radio City Music Hall Productions, and was directed by Gene Saks.

Released in USA on laserdisc December 1988.

Released in United States Winter December 25, 1986