Kim


1h 53m 1951
Kim

Brief Synopsis

Rudyard Kipling's classic tale of an orphaned boy who helps the British Army against Indian rebels.

Film Details

Also Known As
Rudyard Kipling's Kim
Genre
Drama
Adventure
Family
Historical
War
Release Date
Jan 26, 1951
Premiere Information
New York opening: 7 Dec 1950
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
India and United States
Location
Lahore,Pakistan; Luckinow,India; Rajputana,India; Sierra Nevada Mountains, California, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Kim by Rudyard Kipling (New York, 1901).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 53m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
10,130ft

Synopsis

In 1885, in Lahour, India, Kim, a young, white street orphan, survives by begging and stealing while dressed like a native. One night, Kim delivers a message to the beautiful Laluli from Mahbub Ali, or "Red Beard," a spy for the British Secret Service who is posing as a horse trader. Through Kim, the womanizing Red Beard asks Laluli to meet him the following evening and she gladly accepts. Unknown to Kim, Laluli is plotting with Hassan Bey and other Russian-backed rebels who have been trying to foment war with the British-run Indian government, and plans to steal a document from Red Beard, which shows the five points at which the rebels plan to attack the English Army. The next day, on the street, Kim notices an oddly dressed priest and, curious, asks him about his background. After the elderly man reveals that he is a lama from Tibet on a mission to find the "River of the Arrow," Kim offers to beg for him as his "chela," or disciple. Kim then admits that just before dying, his father predicted that Kim would find a "red bull on a green field." The lama suggests that Kim journey with him to Ambala to search for the red bull, and although Kim is intrigued by the holy man, he tells Red Beard that he would rather travel with him to Benares. Red Beard, however, convinces Kim to go with the lama and deliver the rebels' document to Colonel Creighton, the English leader of the Secret Service operation, which has been dubbed "The Great Game." That night, Red Beard, guessing Laluli's scheme, pretends to pass out from drink and spies on her and Hassan Bey as they search his belongings for the document. The next day, after traveling with the lama by train to Ambala, Kim delivers the paper to Creighton, who has learned from English spies Huree Chunder and Lurgan Sahib that the rebels are about to attack. Kim then continues his journey with the gentle lama and becomes a genuine disciple. Eventually, the two come upon Creighton's troops, whose flag consists of a red bull painted against a green background. Realizing that his father's prediction has come true, Kim approaches Father Victor, a priest attached to the unit, and shows him his birth certificate, which he has carried with him since his father's death. Father Victor identifies Kim as the son of Kimball O'Hara, a soldier he once knew, and the lama is startled to learn that Kim is a "sahib," or white person. Although the lama insists that Kim must now be with "his own people," he pledges to pay Kim's way through St. Xavier, the best English military school in India. Creighton, however, sends Kim to an orphanage school in Ambala, where Kim quickly grows bored and escapes with the help of Red Beard. Red Beard then delivers Kim to Creighton, whose troops have scared off the rebels, and to the colonel's surprise, the promised tuition check arrives from the lama. After a brief reunion with the lama, Kim enrolls in St. Xavier, and there struggles to learn the strict rules of white military society. As soon as summer arrives, Kim sneaks off to Red Beard's camp and discovers Hassan Bey posing as a beggar. Kim then overhears the rebel plotting with Red Beard's head man, Abul, to assassinate Red Beard. Kim manages to warn Red Beard about the plot, and the rebels are executed. Now schooled in the brutality of Red Beard's world, Kim is sent to Lurgan, who instructs him in various spy techniques, including how to avoid being hypnotized. Soon, Kim is asked to deliver a message from Huree, who is being followed by three rebel spies, to Creighton. Eluding the spies, Kim safely delivers the message, in which Huree warns that two Russians posing as geologists are collecting military data in the Khyber Pass, and is entrusted with Creighton's reply. When Kim arrives at the rendezvous spot, however, he finds Huree dead and flees. Two weeks later, Red Beard, posing as a goat herder, shows up at Russians' camp in the Khyber Pass and is surprised to find Kim and the lama there. Kim has ingratiated himself with the Russians and encouraged them to believe that the lama, who is still searching for the River of the Arrow, is demented. After Kim surreptitiously informs Red Beard that he has located the Russians' maps and data, which Huree was to steal, an Indian emissary arrives at the camp. The emissary quickly becomes suspicious of Kim and attempts to hypnotize him. Recalling Lurgan's lessons, Kim resists, but his mental strength only serves to convince the emissary that he is indeed a spy. The emissary beats the lama and tries to torture information out of Kim, but Red Beard sneaks up on him and kills him. Red Beard then holds the Russians at gunpoint, but after Kim discovers that a group of rebels is nearby, the Russians overwhelm Red Beard and rush to warn their comrades. With Kim's help, Red Beard manages to stop the Russians and causes a rockslide, which wipes out the approaching rebels. Later, Kim tearfully apologizes to the wounded lama for using him, but the holy man assures his disciple that everything has happened for a reason. Then, after advising Kim to pursue a non-violent path, the lama takes a few stumbling steps and has a vision of a beautiful river. Declaring that he has found the River of the Arrow, the lama collapses in the dry mountain terrain and dies.

Cast

Errol Flynn

Mahbub Ali, the Red Beard

Dean Stockwell

Kim [O'Hara]

Paul Lukas

Lama

Robert Douglas

Colonel Creighton

Thomas Gomez

Emissary

Cecil Kellaway

Huree Chunder

Arnold Moss

Lurgan Sahib

Reginald Owen

Father Victor

Laurette Luez

Laluli

Richard Hale

Hassan Bey

Roman Toporow

Russian

Ivan Triesault

Russian

Hayden Rorke

Major Ainsley

Walter Kingsford

Dr. Bronson

Henry Mirelez

Wanna

Frank Lackteen

Shadow

Frank Richards

Abul

Henry Corden

Conspirator

Peter Mamakos

Conspirator

Donna Martell

Haikun

Rod Redwing

Servant

Hassan Khayyam

Servant

Michael Ansara

Guard

Lou Krugman

Guard

Lal Chand Mehra

Policeman

Felipe Turich

Policeman

Fernando Alvarado

Indian boy

Malik Tahir

Indian boy

Mimi Aguglia

Food purveyor

Stanley Price

Water carrier

Movita Castañeda

Woman with baby

Wallis Clark

British general

Pat Aherne

General's aide

Adeline Dewalt Reynolds

Old Maharanee

Robin Hughes

Sentry

Richard Lupino

Sentry

John Mantley

Orderly

Francis Mcdonald

Letter writer

Edgar Lansbury

Young officer

Maurice Panama

Young officer

Steven Baron

Young officer

Danny Rees

Biggs

I. A. Hafesjee

Scholarly Hindu

Robin Camp

Thorpe

Paul Collins

English student

Christopher Severn

English student

Richard Glynn

English student

Tim Hawkins

English student

George Mcdonald

English student

Curtis Jackson

English student

Lailee Bakhtiar

Native girl on road

Keith Mcconnell

Master

Bobby Barber

Cart driver

Betty Daniels

Miss Manners

Wilson Wood

Gerald

Olaf Hytten

Mr. Fairlee

George Khoury

Little man

Mitchell Lewis

Farmer

M. S. Malek

Burly son

M. S. Bedi

Burly son

William Mccormick

Goat herder

Film Details

Also Known As
Rudyard Kipling's Kim
Genre
Drama
Adventure
Family
Historical
War
Release Date
Jan 26, 1951
Premiere Information
New York opening: 7 Dec 1950
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
India and United States
Location
Lahore,Pakistan; Luckinow,India; Rajputana,India; Sierra Nevada Mountains, California, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Kim by Rudyard Kipling (New York, 1901).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 53m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
10,130ft

Articles

Kim


By the end of the 1940s swashbuckling action hero Errol Flynn had grown very tired of those types of roles and longed to prove himself as a "serious" actor. Years of hard living and heavy drinking had also taken its toll, and with his older, somewhat puffier and dissipated look, he wasn't quite as convincing as a dashing, sword-fighting figure. But he could still be counted on to add a certain amount of flamboyant gusto to a period adventure, so MGM cast him as the roguish horse trader Mahbub Ali in Kim (1950), an adaptation of Rudyard Kipling's classic novel. And it was up to makeup artist William Tuttle to make Flynn "look" believable in his role.

However, the real star of Kim is child actor Dean Stockwell, later known for his adult roles in David Lynch's Blue Velvet (1986) and the television series Quantum Leap (1989 -1993). Stockwell plays the title role, a rebellious British orphan in 1880 India who disguises himself as a native and wanders through the marketplace seeking adventure. He is befriended by a holy lama on a spiritual quest and by a horse trader who is also a secret agent for the British. The three become involved in espionage, foreign intrigue, and an explosive political situation involving the encroachment of Czarist Russian troops into the Khyber Pass.

Stockwell adored Flynn, seeing the older actor as "the ultimate father figure for me." About 12 or 13 years old at the time of filming, the child star also looked up to Flynn as "a truly profound, non-superficial sex symbol," he later said. So notorious for his romantic escapades he gave birth to the popular expression "in like Flynn," the actor lived up to that image by asking the boy on their first meeting if he had had his first sexual encounter yet (in somewhat more graphic language) - in front of Stockwell's mother and on-set teacher. Soon after, he presented the boy with one of his trademark wing pins: three interlocking F's (for "Flynn's Flying F*ckers") that attached to lapels with a device shaped like male genitalia. An infamous practical joker, Flynn also bet the crew he could make the remarkably disciplined Stockwell laugh in the middle of a take. In the scene where Mahbub Ali is supposed to hand Kim a bowl of food for the dying lama, Flynn passed the boy a bowl of camel dung still steaming. Stockwell delivered his line - "Is this okay for the lama to eat?" - with a perfectly straight face, and Flynn lost $500. "I had a hell of a good time shooting that picture," Stockwell admitted.

Stockwell said Flynn was likely to show up on the set "a little blurry-eyed," but the after-effects of the actor's nighttime activities weren't the only challenge for make-up artist William Tuttle. Most of his magic went into convincingly transforming Flynn, Lucas, and Stockwell into, respectively, an Afghani, an Indian holy man, and a British child disguised as a local. Considerable magic also went into matching on-location shots of India with the bulk of the film's exteriors, shot in Lone Pine, California. The studio had attempted to adapt the story to the screen twice before, once with Freddie Bartholomew and Robert Taylor in 1938 and several years later with Mickey Rooney, Conrad Veidt, and Basil Rathbone, but World War II and the Indian struggle for independence from Great Britain repeatedly forced postponement. With liberation finally achieved in 1948, India gave full cooperation to the production. But although Flynn and Lukas both traveled there for location work, the child actor playing Kim never set foot on Indian soil.

Director: Victor Saville
Producer: Leon Gordon
Screenplay: Leon Gordon, Helen Deutsch, Richard Schayer, based on the novel by Rudyard Kipling
Cinematography: William V. Skall
Editing: George Boemler
Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons, Hans Peters
Original Music: Andre Previn
Cast: Errol Flynn (Mahbub Ali, the Red Beard), Dean Stockwell (Kim), Paul Lukas (Lama), Thomas Gomez (Emissary), Cecil Kellaway (Hurree Chunder).
C-113m. Closed captioning. Descriptive video.

by Rob Nixon

Kim

Kim

By the end of the 1940s swashbuckling action hero Errol Flynn had grown very tired of those types of roles and longed to prove himself as a "serious" actor. Years of hard living and heavy drinking had also taken its toll, and with his older, somewhat puffier and dissipated look, he wasn't quite as convincing as a dashing, sword-fighting figure. But he could still be counted on to add a certain amount of flamboyant gusto to a period adventure, so MGM cast him as the roguish horse trader Mahbub Ali in Kim (1950), an adaptation of Rudyard Kipling's classic novel. And it was up to makeup artist William Tuttle to make Flynn "look" believable in his role. However, the real star of Kim is child actor Dean Stockwell, later known for his adult roles in David Lynch's Blue Velvet (1986) and the television series Quantum Leap (1989 -1993). Stockwell plays the title role, a rebellious British orphan in 1880 India who disguises himself as a native and wanders through the marketplace seeking adventure. He is befriended by a holy lama on a spiritual quest and by a horse trader who is also a secret agent for the British. The three become involved in espionage, foreign intrigue, and an explosive political situation involving the encroachment of Czarist Russian troops into the Khyber Pass. Stockwell adored Flynn, seeing the older actor as "the ultimate father figure for me." About 12 or 13 years old at the time of filming, the child star also looked up to Flynn as "a truly profound, non-superficial sex symbol," he later said. So notorious for his romantic escapades he gave birth to the popular expression "in like Flynn," the actor lived up to that image by asking the boy on their first meeting if he had had his first sexual encounter yet (in somewhat more graphic language) - in front of Stockwell's mother and on-set teacher. Soon after, he presented the boy with one of his trademark wing pins: three interlocking F's (for "Flynn's Flying F*ckers") that attached to lapels with a device shaped like male genitalia. An infamous practical joker, Flynn also bet the crew he could make the remarkably disciplined Stockwell laugh in the middle of a take. In the scene where Mahbub Ali is supposed to hand Kim a bowl of food for the dying lama, Flynn passed the boy a bowl of camel dung still steaming. Stockwell delivered his line - "Is this okay for the lama to eat?" - with a perfectly straight face, and Flynn lost $500. "I had a hell of a good time shooting that picture," Stockwell admitted. Stockwell said Flynn was likely to show up on the set "a little blurry-eyed," but the after-effects of the actor's nighttime activities weren't the only challenge for make-up artist William Tuttle. Most of his magic went into convincingly transforming Flynn, Lucas, and Stockwell into, respectively, an Afghani, an Indian holy man, and a British child disguised as a local. Considerable magic also went into matching on-location shots of India with the bulk of the film's exteriors, shot in Lone Pine, California. The studio had attempted to adapt the story to the screen twice before, once with Freddie Bartholomew and Robert Taylor in 1938 and several years later with Mickey Rooney, Conrad Veidt, and Basil Rathbone, but World War II and the Indian struggle for independence from Great Britain repeatedly forced postponement. With liberation finally achieved in 1948, India gave full cooperation to the production. But although Flynn and Lukas both traveled there for location work, the child actor playing Kim never set foot on Indian soil. Director: Victor Saville Producer: Leon Gordon Screenplay: Leon Gordon, Helen Deutsch, Richard Schayer, based on the novel by Rudyard Kipling Cinematography: William V. Skall Editing: George Boemler Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons, Hans Peters Original Music: Andre Previn Cast: Errol Flynn (Mahbub Ali, the Red Beard), Dean Stockwell (Kim), Paul Lukas (Lama), Thomas Gomez (Emissary), Cecil Kellaway (Hurree Chunder). C-113m. Closed captioning. Descriptive video. by Rob Nixon

Errol Flynn in Kim (Now on DVD)


By the end of the 1940s swashbuckling action hero Errol Flynn had grown very tired of those types of roles and longed to prove himself as a "serious" actor. Years of hard living and heavy drinking had also taken its toll, and with his older, somewhat puffier and dissipated look, he wasn't quite as convincing as a dashing, sword-fighting figure. But he could still be counted on to add a certain amount of flamboyant gusto to a period adventure, so MGM cast him as the roguish horse trader Mahbub Ali in Kim (1950), an adaptation of Rudyard Kipling's classic novel (which is now on DVD from Warner Video). And it was up to makeup artist William Tuttle to make Flynn "look" believable in his role.

However, the real star of Kim is child actor Dean Stockwell, later known for his adult roles in David Lynch's Blue Velvet (1986) and the television series Quantum Leap (1989 -1993). Stockwell plays the title role, a rebellious British orphan in 1880 India who disguises himself as a native and wanders through the marketplace seeking adventure. He is befriended by a holy lama on a spiritual quest and by a horse trader who is also a secret agent for the British. The three become involved in espionage, foreign intrigue, and an explosive political situation involving the encroachment of Czarist Russian troops into the Khyber Pass.

Stockwell adored Flynn, seeing the older actor as "the ultimate father figure for me." About 12 or 13 years old at the time of filming, the child star also looked up to Flynn as "a truly profound, non-superficial sex symbol," he later said. So notorious for his romantic escapades he gave birth to the popular expression "in like Flynn," the actor lived up to that image by asking the boy on their first meeting if he had had his first sexual encounter yet (in somewhat more graphic language) - in front of Stockwell's mother and on-set teacher. Soon after, he presented the boy with one of his trademark wing pins: three interlocking F's (for "Flynn's Flying F*ckers") that attached to lapels with a device shaped like male genitalia. An infamous practical joker, Flynn also bet the crew he could make the remarkably disciplined Stockwell laugh in the middle of a take. In the scene where Mahbub Ali is supposed to hand Kim a bowl of food for the dying lama, Flynn passed the boy a bowl of camel dung still steaming. Stockwell delivered his line - "Is this okay for the lama to eat?" - with a perfectly straight face, and Flynn lost $500. "I had a hell of a good time shooting that picture," Stockwell admitted.

Stockwell said Flynn was likely to show up on the set "a little blurry-eyed," but the after-effects of the actor's nighttime activities weren't the only challenge for make-up artist William Tuttle. Most of his magic went into convincingly transforming Flynn, Lucas, and Stockwell into, respectively, an Afghani, an Indian holy man, and a British child disguised as a local. Considerable magic also went into matching on-location shots of India with the bulk of the film's exteriors, shot in Lone Pine, California. The studio had attempted to adapt the story to the screen twice before, once with Freddie Bartholomew and Robert Taylor in 1938 and several years later with Mickey Rooney, Conrad Veidt, and Basil Rathbone, but World War II and the Indian struggle for independence from Great Britain repeatedly forced postponement. With liberation finally achieved in 1948, India gave full cooperation to the production. But although Flynn and Lukas both traveled there for location work, the child actor playing Kim never set foot on Indian soil.

The Warner DVD of Kim looks smashing; the brilliant Technicolor hues are a reminder of just how visually stunning this process could be when applied to a period adventure. Obviously the best available elements were used from the TEC library for mastering this DVD and it's a keeper for any Errol Flynn fan. There's not much in the way of extras, though, except for two Fitzpatrick Traveltalk featurettes - Ancient India and Land of the Taj Mahal - plus the theatrical trailer and an essay on Rudyard Kipling (Does anybody really bother reading these things on their TV screen?).

For more information about Kim, visit Warner Video. To order Kim, go to TCM Shopping.

by Rob Nixon

Errol Flynn in Kim (Now on DVD)

By the end of the 1940s swashbuckling action hero Errol Flynn had grown very tired of those types of roles and longed to prove himself as a "serious" actor. Years of hard living and heavy drinking had also taken its toll, and with his older, somewhat puffier and dissipated look, he wasn't quite as convincing as a dashing, sword-fighting figure. But he could still be counted on to add a certain amount of flamboyant gusto to a period adventure, so MGM cast him as the roguish horse trader Mahbub Ali in Kim (1950), an adaptation of Rudyard Kipling's classic novel (which is now on DVD from Warner Video). And it was up to makeup artist William Tuttle to make Flynn "look" believable in his role. However, the real star of Kim is child actor Dean Stockwell, later known for his adult roles in David Lynch's Blue Velvet (1986) and the television series Quantum Leap (1989 -1993). Stockwell plays the title role, a rebellious British orphan in 1880 India who disguises himself as a native and wanders through the marketplace seeking adventure. He is befriended by a holy lama on a spiritual quest and by a horse trader who is also a secret agent for the British. The three become involved in espionage, foreign intrigue, and an explosive political situation involving the encroachment of Czarist Russian troops into the Khyber Pass. Stockwell adored Flynn, seeing the older actor as "the ultimate father figure for me." About 12 or 13 years old at the time of filming, the child star also looked up to Flynn as "a truly profound, non-superficial sex symbol," he later said. So notorious for his romantic escapades he gave birth to the popular expression "in like Flynn," the actor lived up to that image by asking the boy on their first meeting if he had had his first sexual encounter yet (in somewhat more graphic language) - in front of Stockwell's mother and on-set teacher. Soon after, he presented the boy with one of his trademark wing pins: three interlocking F's (for "Flynn's Flying F*ckers") that attached to lapels with a device shaped like male genitalia. An infamous practical joker, Flynn also bet the crew he could make the remarkably disciplined Stockwell laugh in the middle of a take. In the scene where Mahbub Ali is supposed to hand Kim a bowl of food for the dying lama, Flynn passed the boy a bowl of camel dung still steaming. Stockwell delivered his line - "Is this okay for the lama to eat?" - with a perfectly straight face, and Flynn lost $500. "I had a hell of a good time shooting that picture," Stockwell admitted. Stockwell said Flynn was likely to show up on the set "a little blurry-eyed," but the after-effects of the actor's nighttime activities weren't the only challenge for make-up artist William Tuttle. Most of his magic went into convincingly transforming Flynn, Lucas, and Stockwell into, respectively, an Afghani, an Indian holy man, and a British child disguised as a local. Considerable magic also went into matching on-location shots of India with the bulk of the film's exteriors, shot in Lone Pine, California. The studio had attempted to adapt the story to the screen twice before, once with Freddie Bartholomew and Robert Taylor in 1938 and several years later with Mickey Rooney, Conrad Veidt, and Basil Rathbone, but World War II and the Indian struggle for independence from Great Britain repeatedly forced postponement. With liberation finally achieved in 1948, India gave full cooperation to the production. But although Flynn and Lukas both traveled there for location work, the child actor playing Kim never set foot on Indian soil. The Warner DVD of Kim looks smashing; the brilliant Technicolor hues are a reminder of just how visually stunning this process could be when applied to a period adventure. Obviously the best available elements were used from the TEC library for mastering this DVD and it's a keeper for any Errol Flynn fan. There's not much in the way of extras, though, except for two Fitzpatrick Traveltalk featurettes - Ancient India and Land of the Taj Mahal - plus the theatrical trailer and an essay on Rudyard Kipling (Does anybody really bother reading these things on their TV screen?). For more information about Kim, visit Warner Video. To order Kim, go to TCM Shopping. by Rob Nixon

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The title card of this film reads: "Rudyard Kipling's Kim." The screen credits contain the following written acknowledgment: "To the government of India and to His Highness, the Maharajah of Jaipur, and His Highness, the Maharajah of Bundi, we express our deep appreciation for the facilities afforded us in filming this picture in India." The picture opens with an onscreen narrator, or storyteller, speaking directly to the audience about the historical period and setting of the story. The same narrator speaks offscreen intermittently throughout the film.
       Kipling's novel was first published serially in McClure's magazine (Dec 1900-October 1901). According to a modern interview with director Victor Saville, M-G-M studio head Irving Thalberg purchased the screen rights to the novel in 1934, and some contemporary news items announced the studio's plan to film the story as early as 1935. An April 1937 The Washington Times article, however, reported that M-G-M had "recently" bought the screen rights from stage actress Maude Adams, and an August 1942 Hollywood Reporter news item claimed that M-G-M had acquired the property "many years ago" from Cosmopolitan Productions.
       Various contemporary news items indicate that preparations to shoot Kim were begun and halted a number of times during the period between 1935 and 1949. Some of the delays and false starts were attributed to script difficulties. A February 1949 New York Times article states that a total of eight scripts were written and rejected between 1935 and 1942. According to news items in 1935, M-G-M borrowed Howard Estabrook from Twentieth Century-Fox to write the first draft of the screenplay. Louis D. Lighton was the first producer assigned to the film, and Freddie Bartholomew and Lionel Barrymore were among the first stars cast.
       Preparations were suspended sometime before September 1936, when M-G-M began production on Captains Courageous, a film based on another Kipling novel. Captains Courageous was produced by Lighton, directed by Victor Fleming and starred Bartholomew, Barrymore and Spencer Tracy (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40; F3.0595). In April 1937, two months before Captains Courageous was released, M-G-M announced that Kim would be made with Lighton producing, Fleming directing, Bartholomew in the title role and Robert Taylor in the part initially announced for Barrymore. Lighton's production was subsequently shelved, however, and Hollywood Reporter did not report on any further work on Kim until January 1942, when it was announced that Victor Saville would produce the film with a script by Leon Gordon.
       In April 1942, Mickey Rooney was announced for the title role, and later Akim Tamiroff, Laird Cregar, Conrad Veidt and Basil Rathbone were announced for parts. According to the modern interview with Saville, Cedric Hardwicke was set to play the "Lama" before the first screenplay had been approved. In mid-July 1942, a Hollywood Reporter news item noted that filming would begin "within three weeks," with Richard Thorpe directing. Herbert Stothart was assigned to write the musical score, Harry Stradling was set as the cinematographer, and locations were being scouted in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. A mid-August 1942 Hollywood Reporter news items noted that John Carradine had been added to the cast of the production, which was to be shot in Technicolor, and that George Sanders was being sought for a role. However, one week later, on August 21, 1942, Hollywood Reporter announced that Kim had been "postponed" due to script difficulties. The February 1949 New York Times article notes that the project was shelved in 1942 "at the 'suggestion' of the Office of War Information because of its imperialistic and 'white supremacy' implications."
       Plans to film the novel were revived in January 1949, when M-G-M put the project back on its production schedule and announced that Dean Stockwell would play the title role. News items in New York Times relate the following information about the production: Gordon used much of the scenario he had written in 1942, though some changes were made to play down the political aspects of the novel. Filming began on December 5, 1949 at the St. Xavier school in Luckinow, India. The M-G-M unit remained in India until mid-January 1950, shooting mostly exteriors. Only a few of the cast members traveled to India. According to a January 1951 article in Hollywood Citizen-News, M-G-M did not send Stockwell to India because of his young age and the possibility that the trip would endanger his health. Instead, a young Indian boy was used as a double for Stockwell. The double appeared at a distance or with his back to the camera, and his shots were later intercut with footage of Stockwell that was filmed in Hollywood. In addition to the Luckinow location, filming also took place at Lahore, Pakistan, and on the great trunk road in Rajputana, India. After a one-month break in production, shooting resumed in Hollywood on 16 February 1950.
       According to a October 20, 1949 Hollywood Reporter news item, Errol Flynn was to receive $200,000 for his performance as "Red Beard." A January 1950 news item in Daily Variety lists Yvette Duguay in the cast, but her appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. Although Jeanette Nolan is credited in the CBCS with the role "Foster mother," she did not appear in the released film. In the modern interview, Saville recalled the following facts about the production: After meeting with the Indian ambassador in 1942, Saville advised M-G-M that it would be impossible to do the film in the political climate at the time. Flynn and Paul Lukas were the only stars flown to India for the shooting there. The Sierra Nevada Mountains were used for the mountain backgrounds instead of the Himalayas, which proved too large to capture on film. Saville estimated that the final cost of the exterior shooting was $130,000. Kim received mixed notices when it was released in 1950, but earned Box Office's Blue Ribbon Award. Flynn and Dean Stockwell recreated their roles for a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast on February 18, 1952.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter January 26, 1951

Released in United States March 1975

Released in United States Winter January 26, 1951

Released in United States March 1975 (Shown at FILMEX: Los Angeles International Film Exposition March 13-26, 1975.)