The Freshman


1h 42m 1990
The Freshman

Brief Synopsis

A young film student gets mixed up with the mob when his possessions are stolen.

Film Details

Also Known As
Boss e la Matricola, Don Sabatini, El Novato, Freshman, Il Boss e la Matricola, Novato, El, Ny i maffian, Premiers pas dans la Mafia
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Crime
Release Date
1990
Distribution Company
TriStar Pictures
Location
New York City, New York, USA; Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 42m

Synopsis

A young man from Vermont goes to film school in New York City where's he's hired by a gangster.

Crew

Ken Adam

Production Designer

Barry Adamson

Song

Jodie Arenberg

Assistant

Lloyd Bacon

Other

Blixa Bargeld

Song

Caroline Barrett

Assistant

Guenter Bartlik

Scenic Artist

Tony Bennett

Song Performer

Andrew Bergman

Theme Lyrics

Andrew Bergman

Screenplay

Louis Bertini

Sound Editor

Sandra Bezic

Advisor

Elisha Birnbaum

Foley Artist

Cesare Andrea Bixio

Song

Julie A. Bloom

Assistant Director

Beth Boigon

Location Manager

David Boulton

Adr

Trissy Bowers

Sound Editor

Tim Boyle

Music

Shelley Boylen

Production Coordinator

Gary J Brink

Set Decorator

Jim Brockett

Animal Trainer

James Douglas Brown

Hair

Dominique Bruballa

Production Accountant

Thomas Byan

Assistant Camera Operator

Colleen Callaghan

Hair

Stephen S. Campanelli

Steadicam Operator

Hoagy Carmichael

Song

Nick Cave

Song

Jiggs Chase

Song

Kim Chow

Wardrobe

Ken Clark

Props

Tammy Quinn Clarke

Other

Cynthia Clayton

Assistant Director

Nat King Cole

Song

Dana Congdon

Assistant Editor

Shelley Cook

Stunts

Carmine Coppola

Song

Francis Ford Coppola

Other

Christopher Cronyn

Unit Production Manager

Louis D'esposito

Assistant Director

Robert Daprato

Grip

Marc Dassas

Location Manager

Susanna David

Script Supervisor

Daniel R Davis

Art Director

John Davis

Production Assistant

Joseph Debeasi

Music Editor

Elliot Deitch

Sound Editor

Elizabeth Dellureficio

Sound Editor

David Dreishpoon

Craft Service

Al Dubin

Song

Bob Dylan

Song

Eazy-e

Song

Dan Edelstein

Sound Editor

Tony Eldridge

Electrician

David Ellis

Stunt Coordinator

Peter B. Ellis

Assistant Editor

Russ Engels

Gaffer

Cindy Evans

Assistant

Ray Evans

Song

Mike Fenton

Casting

William Fraker

Director Of Photography

William Fraker

Dp/Cinematographer

Melvin Glover

Song

Harlan Goodman

Music Supervisor

Lynda Gordon

Casting

Patricia Green

Makeup

Joe Gutowski

Adr Editor

Paul Harding

Property Master

Bill Harman

Construction Coordinator

Mick Harvey

Song

Kerry Hayes

Photography

Karen Hazzard

Casting

Arlene Hellerman

Assistant

Chris Holmes

Gaffer

Eric Holmes

Rigging Gaffer

Michael Jacobi

Adr Editor

Neil L Kaufman

Sound Editor

James Kennedy

Transportation Captain

Alicia Keywan

Art Director

Cal Kohne

Grip

Craig S Kohne

Transportation Captain

Michael Kohne

Key Grip

Dan Korintus

Sound Editor

Lacia Kornylo

Production Manager

Joan Krawczyk

Art Department

Ron Lambert

Color Timer

Anita Lane

Song

Richard Lightstone

Sound Mixer

Jay Livingston

Song

Mike Lobell

Producer

Frank Loesser

Song

M.c. Ren

Song

Aleida Macdonald

Assistant

Barry Malkin

Editor

Larry Mcconkey

Steadicam Operator

Douglas A Mclean

Art Director

David Mclennan

Assistant Director

Johnny Mercer

Song

Charles Miller

Location Manager

Michael Minkler

Sound

Rocco Musacchia

Technical Advisor

Robert Musco

Wardrobe Supervisor

Neri

Song

David Newman

Music

Harald Ortenburger

Camera Operator

Richard Parker

Animal Wrangler

Bert Parks

Song Performer

George Patsos

Key Grip

Gina Perry

Animal Trainer

Tom Quinn

Assistant Director

Hugo Race

Song

Marlene Rain

On-Set Dresser

Marie Rhodes

Dialogue Coach

Philip Rhodes

Hair

Philip Rhodes

Makeup

Chuck Rio

Song

Sylvia Robinson

Song

Jason V Rodney

Location Manager

Robin Russell

Assistant Editor

Charlane Rutherford

Assistant

Steve Scanlon

Boom Operator

David Sheridan

Assistant Camera Operator

Gordon Sim

Set Decorator

Ira Spiegel

Sound Editor

John Stead

Stunts

Walter Stocklin

Property Master

John Stoneham

Stunts

Nick Sweetman

Transportation Coordinator

Jules Sylvester

Animal Trainer

Ferruccio Tagliavini

Song Performer

Debra Tanklow

Production Coordinator

Judy Taylor

Casting

Jim Thompson

Boom Operator

Neil Trifunovich

Special Effects Coordinator

Rose Trimarco Cuervo

Wardrobe Supervisor

Tom Villano

Music Editor

Sadie Vimmerstedt

Song

David Wahnon

Sound Editor

Harry Warren

Song

Bernie Wayne

Song

Julia Weinstein

Assistant

Julie Weiss

Costume Designer

James Whalen

Transportation Captain

Gordon White

Art Director

Anne Wooten

Choreographer

Michael Zansky

Scenic Artist

Videos

Movie Clip

Freshman, The (1990) - Carmine Said One Boy Having just delivered the komodo dragon to New Jersey for the gangster-y Marlon Brando, NYU freshmen Clark and Steve (Matthew Broderick, Frank Whaley) meet Edward (B.D. Wong) and Maximilian Schell as kooky Larry London, and discover the menagerie no one had mentioned, in writer-director Andrew Bergman’s The Freshman, 1990.
Freshman, The (1990) - It Ain't Tony Bennett! New NYU film-school freshman Clark (Matthew Broderick) arrives in Little Italy and meets Victor (Bruno Kirby), who’s trying to make up for stealing and losing all his money, and who has promised him a job with his uncle Carmine (Marlon Brando), revealing the central joke, in writer-director Andrew Bergman’s The Freshman, 1990.
Freshman, The (1990) - The Glue Of Society Arrived at Grand Central Station from Vermont, headed downtown to NYU, matriculating Clark (Matthew Broderick) meets Victor (Bruno Kirby), early in writer-director Andrew Bergman’s hybrid comedy hit The Freshman, 1990, co-starring Marlon Brando, Maximilian Schell and Penelope Ann Miller.
Freshman, The (1990) - Guns And Provolone In his NYU film class, Clark (Matthew Broderick) is studying The Godfather: Part II, 1974, just after he’s been hired by Carmine Sabatini (played by Marlon Brando), who he’s been told was the basis for the Vito Corleone character, writer-director Andrew Bergman’s joke being about Paul Benedict as the pompous professor Fleeber, in The Freshman, 1990.
Freshman, The (1990) - The Son I Never Had Back at the Llittle Italy social club, NYU freshman Clark (Matthew Broderick) had intended to quit his job transporting endangered species for Godfather-like Carmine (Marlon Brando), but discovers he’s now engaged to his daughter, and receiving a gift, Bruno Kirby the nephew Victor, in The Freshman, 1990.
Freshman, The (1990) - It's Safe Here In Queens? Though visiting Queens was not mentioned in earlier scenes, NYU film school freshman Clark (Matthew Broderick), who because he’s broke has agreed to make a lucrative delivery for the uncannily Godfather-like Carmine Sabatini (Marlon Brando) arrives to get his car and is plausibly transfixed by Penelope Ann Miller as daughter Tina, in The Freshman, 1990.

Trailer

Film Details

Also Known As
Boss e la Matricola, Don Sabatini, El Novato, Freshman, Il Boss e la Matricola, Novato, El, Ny i maffian, Premiers pas dans la Mafia
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Crime
Release Date
1990
Distribution Company
TriStar Pictures
Location
New York City, New York, USA; Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 42m

Articles

The Freshman (1990)


The movies Marlon Brando appeared in after his swift ascent to acting-god status in the early 50s are almost all partially remembered for the feathers Brando ruffled while filming them. His life was forever complicated by his mercurial mood swings, a calculated disregard for any form of etiquette, and the blatant way that he manipulated his family, lovers, and closest friends. Simply put, Brando was hugely gifted and too often a difficult, self-absorbed actor, a flaw that eventually clouded his standing as one of the four or five greatest actors of the 20th century. Perhaps the most potently bizarre thing about Brando is that this tainting of his legend appeared to have been a personal goal.

Andrew Bergman's The Freshman (1990), in which Brando pokes fun at his iconic performance as Vito Corleone in The Godfather (1972), is a perfect example of the kind of havoc he could wreak when the mood struck him. Although the picture signaled something of a return to form for the actor, Brando managed - while it was being filmed - to needlessly antagonize a dear friend, two of his own children, and almost every person connected with the project.

In The Freshman's deliberately twisted screwball plot, Matthew Broderick plays Clark Kellogg, an NYU film student who's robbed by Victor (Bruno Kirby), a Little Italy thug, the moment he hits town to begin classes, leaving him broke. Clark tracks Victor down, and Victor, who no longer has the money, offers to introduce him to his Uncle Carmine (Brando), an "importer-exporter" who can give Clark a legitimate job. When Clark, a movie fanatic, meets Carmine, he's immediately stunned by his eerie resemblance to...Marlon Brando in The Godfather. The first meeting between Broderick and Brando is arguably the best scene in the film, as Carmine alternately seduces and terrifies Clark with equal aplomb.

Clark will accept the job, which consists of importing endangered animals to the US for exotic dining purposes (don't ask). He will also fall in love with Carmine's beautiful daughter, Tina (Penelope Ann Miller, who looks about as Italian as Diane Keaton does.) Clark will wind up involved in a scam that's way over his head, and you'll get to see and hear Bert Parks croon a freakish version of Bob Dylan's quasi-humorous protest anthem, "Maggie's Farm."

Oddly, it was Brando who originally made contact with Bergman, rather than the other way around. Bergman remembers that Brando called him "out of the blue" to tell him how much he laughed at a video of the director's outrageous comedy The In-Laws (1979). About a year after that, Bergman sent Brando an early draft of his script for The Freshman. Brando liked what he saw, and soon had a contract that promised him $3.3 million and 11 percent of the picture's gross. Not bad for a glorified supporting role.

The New York portion of the shoot went smoothly and was uneventful. But when Brando re-joined the cast and crew for further work in Toronto, things began to unravel. In fact, Brando's long-time friend, Philip Rhodes, a makeup man who also worked on The Freshman, felt that Brando was having a nervous breakdown. Just a few days into the Toronto shoot, Brando screamed wildly at Rhodes, accusing him of having leaked some of his personal information to the press. Rhodes had argued with Brando before, but never anything like this.

"It was frightening, and then he refused to talk to me throughout the rest of the picture," Rhodes later told Brando biographer Peter Manso. "He froze me out, just ignored me." Rhodes, however, felt that he finally recognized what made Brando turn on people who were close to him. "I came to understand that he had decided that people like me, who knew about his life, are dangerous, and then he stops thinking and has these irrational blowups. So after The Freshman we didn't speak for at least a year and a half."

So that was how Brando treated a "friend." Next came Brando's family. His first sleight was when his troubled son, Christian, attempted to get a small role in the movie. Brando simply waved the request away, apparently never recognizing how badly he hurt Christian's feelings. Then, Brando's equally troubled teenage daughter, Cheyenne, tried to come visit him in Toronto. But he refused to let her.

According to Cheyenne, her father had initially said she could come watch him act before the cameras, something she had never done, and she was very much looking forward to spending time with him. Viewing this latest, wholly unexpected rejection as a betrayal, Cheyenne hung up the phone after quarreling with Brando, sped off in her jeep, and promptly turned it over. She suffered severe injuries, and would have to endure multiple operations to reconstruct her face and skull.

And then there was the cast and crew, most of whom Brando managed to offend in a single self-serving gesture that was completely unexpected. Near the end of filming, Brando threw a lavish party, where he warmly handed out gifts to his assembled co-workers. Shortly after that, he went out to dinner with several members of the cast and crew, and seemed to be having a fine time. Little did these people know, however, that, he had recently given an interview to the Toronto Globe and Mail wherein he derided many of them.

"It's horrible," he said of the movie. "It's going to be a flop, but after this I'm retiring. I'm so fed up. This picture, except for the Canadian crew, was an extremely unpleasant experience. I wish I hadn't finished with a stinker." Brando, it should be noted, called the paper himself to volunteer this information. It's not like some crafty reporter goaded him into saying it.

It was quickly determined that Brando tried to sabotage the picture due to a quarrel he was having with its production company, Tristar. He was trying to extract $50,000 in overtime from them, so - why not nail everyone he was working with in the process?

Soon enough, though, Brando realized that his comments, if they managed to taint the box office, would also limit how much money he'd make. So he called his castmates and offered apologies (Broderick, for one, was unmoved), then issued a public request for forgiveness that praised Bergman's "screamingly funny script." He even went so far as to say that "the movie contains moments of high comedy that will be remembered for decades to come."

Regardless of Brando's flip-flopping on the merits or deficiencies of The Freshman, most critics acknowledged the film's oddball comic charm with Roger Ebert stating, "There have been a lot of movies where stars have repeated the triumphs of their parts - but has any star ever done it more triumphantly than Marlon Brando does in "The Freshmen"? He is doing a reprise here of his most popular character, Don Vito Corleone of "The Godfather," and he does it with such wit, discipline and seriousness that it's not a ripoff and it's not a cheap shot, it's a brilliant comic masterstroke."

Producer: Mike Lobell
Director: Andrew Bergman
Screenplay: Andrew Bergman
Cinematography: William A. Fraker
Editing: Barry Malkin
Music: David Newman
Production Design: Ken Adam
Art Design: Alicia Keywan
Set Design: Gordon Sim
Costume Design: Julie Weiss
Makeup: Patricia Green
Technical Adviser: Rocco Musacchia
Cast: Marlon Brando (Carmine Sabatini), Matthew Broderick (Clark Kellogg), Bruno Kirby (Victor Ray), Penelope Ann Miller (Tina Sabatini), Frank Whaley (Steve Bushak), Jon Polito (Chuck Greenwald), Paul Benedict (Arthur Fleeber), Richard Grant (Lloyd Simpson), Kenneth Welsh (Dwight Armstrong), Pamela Payton-Wright (Liz Armstrong), B.D. Wong (Edward), Maximilian Schell (Larry London), Bert Parks (Himself).
C-102m. Letterboxed.

by Paul Tatara
The Freshman (1990)

The Freshman (1990)

The movies Marlon Brando appeared in after his swift ascent to acting-god status in the early 50s are almost all partially remembered for the feathers Brando ruffled while filming them. His life was forever complicated by his mercurial mood swings, a calculated disregard for any form of etiquette, and the blatant way that he manipulated his family, lovers, and closest friends. Simply put, Brando was hugely gifted and too often a difficult, self-absorbed actor, a flaw that eventually clouded his standing as one of the four or five greatest actors of the 20th century. Perhaps the most potently bizarre thing about Brando is that this tainting of his legend appeared to have been a personal goal. Andrew Bergman's The Freshman (1990), in which Brando pokes fun at his iconic performance as Vito Corleone in The Godfather (1972), is a perfect example of the kind of havoc he could wreak when the mood struck him. Although the picture signaled something of a return to form for the actor, Brando managed - while it was being filmed - to needlessly antagonize a dear friend, two of his own children, and almost every person connected with the project. In The Freshman's deliberately twisted screwball plot, Matthew Broderick plays Clark Kellogg, an NYU film student who's robbed by Victor (Bruno Kirby), a Little Italy thug, the moment he hits town to begin classes, leaving him broke. Clark tracks Victor down, and Victor, who no longer has the money, offers to introduce him to his Uncle Carmine (Brando), an "importer-exporter" who can give Clark a legitimate job. When Clark, a movie fanatic, meets Carmine, he's immediately stunned by his eerie resemblance to...Marlon Brando in The Godfather. The first meeting between Broderick and Brando is arguably the best scene in the film, as Carmine alternately seduces and terrifies Clark with equal aplomb. Clark will accept the job, which consists of importing endangered animals to the US for exotic dining purposes (don't ask). He will also fall in love with Carmine's beautiful daughter, Tina (Penelope Ann Miller, who looks about as Italian as Diane Keaton does.) Clark will wind up involved in a scam that's way over his head, and you'll get to see and hear Bert Parks croon a freakish version of Bob Dylan's quasi-humorous protest anthem, "Maggie's Farm." Oddly, it was Brando who originally made contact with Bergman, rather than the other way around. Bergman remembers that Brando called him "out of the blue" to tell him how much he laughed at a video of the director's outrageous comedy The In-Laws (1979). About a year after that, Bergman sent Brando an early draft of his script for The Freshman. Brando liked what he saw, and soon had a contract that promised him $3.3 million and 11 percent of the picture's gross. Not bad for a glorified supporting role. The New York portion of the shoot went smoothly and was uneventful. But when Brando re-joined the cast and crew for further work in Toronto, things began to unravel. In fact, Brando's long-time friend, Philip Rhodes, a makeup man who also worked on The Freshman, felt that Brando was having a nervous breakdown. Just a few days into the Toronto shoot, Brando screamed wildly at Rhodes, accusing him of having leaked some of his personal information to the press. Rhodes had argued with Brando before, but never anything like this. "It was frightening, and then he refused to talk to me throughout the rest of the picture," Rhodes later told Brando biographer Peter Manso. "He froze me out, just ignored me." Rhodes, however, felt that he finally recognized what made Brando turn on people who were close to him. "I came to understand that he had decided that people like me, who knew about his life, are dangerous, and then he stops thinking and has these irrational blowups. So after The Freshman we didn't speak for at least a year and a half." So that was how Brando treated a "friend." Next came Brando's family. His first sleight was when his troubled son, Christian, attempted to get a small role in the movie. Brando simply waved the request away, apparently never recognizing how badly he hurt Christian's feelings. Then, Brando's equally troubled teenage daughter, Cheyenne, tried to come visit him in Toronto. But he refused to let her. According to Cheyenne, her father had initially said she could come watch him act before the cameras, something she had never done, and she was very much looking forward to spending time with him. Viewing this latest, wholly unexpected rejection as a betrayal, Cheyenne hung up the phone after quarreling with Brando, sped off in her jeep, and promptly turned it over. She suffered severe injuries, and would have to endure multiple operations to reconstruct her face and skull. And then there was the cast and crew, most of whom Brando managed to offend in a single self-serving gesture that was completely unexpected. Near the end of filming, Brando threw a lavish party, where he warmly handed out gifts to his assembled co-workers. Shortly after that, he went out to dinner with several members of the cast and crew, and seemed to be having a fine time. Little did these people know, however, that, he had recently given an interview to the Toronto Globe and Mail wherein he derided many of them. "It's horrible," he said of the movie. "It's going to be a flop, but after this I'm retiring. I'm so fed up. This picture, except for the Canadian crew, was an extremely unpleasant experience. I wish I hadn't finished with a stinker." Brando, it should be noted, called the paper himself to volunteer this information. It's not like some crafty reporter goaded him into saying it. It was quickly determined that Brando tried to sabotage the picture due to a quarrel he was having with its production company, Tristar. He was trying to extract $50,000 in overtime from them, so - why not nail everyone he was working with in the process? Soon enough, though, Brando realized that his comments, if they managed to taint the box office, would also limit how much money he'd make. So he called his castmates and offered apologies (Broderick, for one, was unmoved), then issued a public request for forgiveness that praised Bergman's "screamingly funny script." He even went so far as to say that "the movie contains moments of high comedy that will be remembered for decades to come." Regardless of Brando's flip-flopping on the merits or deficiencies of The Freshman, most critics acknowledged the film's oddball comic charm with Roger Ebert stating, "There have been a lot of movies where stars have repeated the triumphs of their parts - but has any star ever done it more triumphantly than Marlon Brando does in "The Freshmen"? He is doing a reprise here of his most popular character, Don Vito Corleone of "The Godfather," and he does it with such wit, discipline and seriousness that it's not a ripoff and it's not a cheap shot, it's a brilliant comic masterstroke." Producer: Mike Lobell Director: Andrew Bergman Screenplay: Andrew Bergman Cinematography: William A. Fraker Editing: Barry Malkin Music: David Newman Production Design: Ken Adam Art Design: Alicia Keywan Set Design: Gordon Sim Costume Design: Julie Weiss Makeup: Patricia Green Technical Adviser: Rocco Musacchia Cast: Marlon Brando (Carmine Sabatini), Matthew Broderick (Clark Kellogg), Bruno Kirby (Victor Ray), Penelope Ann Miller (Tina Sabatini), Frank Whaley (Steve Bushak), Jon Polito (Chuck Greenwald), Paul Benedict (Arthur Fleeber), Richard Grant (Lloyd Simpson), Kenneth Welsh (Dwight Armstrong), Pamela Payton-Wright (Liz Armstrong), B.D. Wong (Edward), Maximilian Schell (Larry London), Bert Parks (Himself). C-102m. Letterboxed. by Paul Tatara

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Limited Release in United States July 20, 1990

Released in United States Summer July 20, 1990

Wide Release in United States July 27, 1990

Released in United States on Video January 23, 1991

Released in United States 1990

Shown at Deauville Film Festival August 31 - September 9, 1990.

Began shooting June 6, 1989.

Completed shooting August 30, 1989.

Limited Release in United States July 20, 1990

Released in United States Summer July 20, 1990

Wide Release in United States July 27, 1990

Released in United States on Video January 23, 1991

Released in United States 1990 (Shown at Deauville Film Festival August 31 - September 9, 1990.)