The Go Getter


1h 32m 1937
The Go Getter

Brief Synopsis

A Navy veteran with one leg fights to make himself a success.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
May 22, 1937
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "The Go-Getter" by Peter B. Kyne in Hearst's International-Cosmopolitan (publication date undetermined).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 32m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
10 reels

Synopsis

Unemployed lumber salesman Bill Austin is determined to get a job with the Ricks' Lumber Company in San Francisco. When neither Lloyd Skinner nor Matt Peasley, the two men who run the company, will hire him because he is lame from a war wound, Bill approaches the owner, Cappy Ricks, directly. While he is waiting to see Ricks, he strikes up a conversation with Margaret Ricks, not knowing that she is Ricks's daughter. He assumes that she is also looking for a job and asks her to attend a movie with him that evening. After she accepts, she is ushered into Ricks's office, where she convinces her father to give Bill a job by telling him that both Skinner and Peasley turned him down. Ricks tells Bill in Skinner's presence that he will be given the toughest job at the company, selling skunk spruce, and if he does not make good he will be out of a job. Confidently, Bill welcomes the challenge. Although believing at first that Margaret is a maid in the Ricks's home, Bill still wants to date her when he learns she is Ricks's daughter. That evening Bill and Margaret fall in love, but the next day, Bill is off on his sales trip. He is very successful, selling all the skunk spruce on hand as well as more orders than the company can fill. When he closes a difficult deal, he is awarded a raise. Before he assigns Bill to head the Shanghai office, Ricks devises a test to ensure that he is the right man for the job. He asks Bill to buy a certain vase with his own money and deliver it to him on the Santa Barbara train. In the meantime, Bill asks Margaret to marry him and she accepts. Ricks is unwilling to lose his only daughter and now is doubly determined to see Bill fail. Ricks has given Bill the wrong location of the store and, by the time he finds it, the store is closed. Bill then tracks down the owner, pawns Margaret's engagment ring for the money to buy the vase, and finds an old shipmate to fly him to meet the train. Ricks is astonished to see Bill, but pleased. When he tells Bill that the whole thing was a trick to test him, Bill is initially crushed, but after he learns about the new job, he announces that he and Margaret will marry before he leaves, which they do despite Ricks's protests. Ricks then tries to prevent their sailing to Shanghai by purchasing all the staterooms on the ship. Bill and Margaret outwit him by coming aboard in a car. Then Ricks learns that the strikers at his company will only talk to Bill. He wires Bill aboard ship, and true to his motto, "It Shall Be Done," Bill, accompanied by Margaret, comes ashore. Bill settles the strike and Ricks sends Skinner to Shanghai, awarding Bill with Skinner's old job.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
May 22, 1937
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "The Go-Getter" by Peter B. Kyne in Hearst's International-Cosmopolitan (publication date undetermined).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 32m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
10 reels

Articles

The Go Getter (1937) -


Visionary Hollywood filmmaker Busby Berkeley directed his first non-musical in the aftermath of a tragic 1935 road accident that had left three dead and five injured - among them, Berkeley himself, who was wheeled into Los Angeles Municipal Court on a stretcher to face charges of vehicular manslaughter. Though he was eventually acquitted, the damage to body and soul was done as Berkeley drifted into career doldrums, a dissatisfaction aggravated by what he felt was an industry-wide disregard for his talents. A degree of recognition came with a 1936 citation from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for his contributions to musical productions in movies but Berkeley's request for a pay raise went unanswered at Warner Brothers. Scripted by future director Delmer Daves (who had adapted The Petrified Forest [1936] for Archie Mayo the previous year), The Go Getter stars George Brent as a plucky World War I veteran who, minus a leg, attempts to make it big in the lumber industry by adhering to the motto "It shall be done." Based on a magazine story by Peter B. Kyne and a 1923 silent film of the same name, The Go Getter did little for Berkeley's career. Emigrating to MGM, he directed several pictures starring Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland and mentored an up and coming actor-dancer named Gene Kelly.

By Richard Harland Smith
The Go Getter (1937) -

The Go Getter (1937) -

Visionary Hollywood filmmaker Busby Berkeley directed his first non-musical in the aftermath of a tragic 1935 road accident that had left three dead and five injured - among them, Berkeley himself, who was wheeled into Los Angeles Municipal Court on a stretcher to face charges of vehicular manslaughter. Though he was eventually acquitted, the damage to body and soul was done as Berkeley drifted into career doldrums, a dissatisfaction aggravated by what he felt was an industry-wide disregard for his talents. A degree of recognition came with a 1936 citation from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for his contributions to musical productions in movies but Berkeley's request for a pay raise went unanswered at Warner Brothers. Scripted by future director Delmer Daves (who had adapted The Petrified Forest [1936] for Archie Mayo the previous year), The Go Getter stars George Brent as a plucky World War I veteran who, minus a leg, attempts to make it big in the lumber industry by adhering to the motto "It shall be done." Based on a magazine story by Peter B. Kyne and a 1923 silent film of the same name, The Go Getter did little for Berkeley's career. Emigrating to MGM, he directed several pictures starring Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland and mentored an up and coming actor-dancer named Gene Kelly. By Richard Harland Smith

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

"The Go-Getter" was also published in Peter B. Kyne's book Cappy Ricks Comes Back (New York, 1934). It was one of a series of stories Kyne wrote around the character of Cappy Ricks. According to Motion Picture Herald, Ricardo Cortez was originally assigned to the part of Lloyd Skinner. Mathilde Comont, Kenneth Harlan and Myrtle Stedman are listed in early reports of the cast, but their participation in the final film has not been confirmed. For other films based on Kyne's stories about Cappy Ricks, see entry above for Cappy Ricks Returns.