I Love You Again


1h 39m 1940
I Love You Again

Brief Synopsis

A solid married man discovers he's forgotten a past existence as a con artist.

Photos & Videos

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Drama
Adaptation
Classic Hollywood
Release Date
Aug 9, 1940
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel I Love You Again by Octavus Roy Cohen (New York and London, 1937).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 39m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
10 reels

Synopsis

While on a vacation cruise, the sanctimonious and niggardly Larry Wilson is knocked unconscious by an oar and awakens to find that he has been suffering from amnesia for nine years and that he is really George Carey, a slick confidence man. After a peek at his alter ego's bank balance, George decides to return as Larry to Habersville, Pennsylvania, in order to liquidate his bank accounts. Upon docking, George and his new friend, con man "Doc" Ryan, are met at the pier by Kay Wilson who, thinking that George is her husband Larry, demands a divorce on the grounds of boredom. When George learns that Larry's funds are under the control of the Community Chest and Anti-Vice crusade, he decides to switch tactics and run an oil scam on a vacant lot owned by Larry. After sending for his old partner in crime, Duke Sheldon, to "salt" the land, George realizes that he needs to keep the scandal of divorce at bay until he can complete his scam, and so promises to grant Kay her divorce in six weeks. Settling into Larry's life and house, George begins to court Kay, who is stunned at the change in her husband. After setting the bait for his trap, George sends his patrol of boy rangers to discover the oil, and soon the boys's fathers are knocking on Larry's door with offers to buy his land. However, George's plans go awry when Kay confesses that she loves him and he realizes that he loves her and wants to settle down permanently as Larry Wilson. When Duke refuses to call off the scam, George feigns amnesia. While Duke shepherds the town fathers off for the slaughter, George begins life over as Larry.

Photo Collections

I Love You Again - Movie Poster
Here is the American One-Sheet Movie Poster for I Love You Again (1940), starring William Powell and Myrna Loy. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Drama
Adaptation
Classic Hollywood
Release Date
Aug 9, 1940
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel I Love You Again by Octavus Roy Cohen (New York and London, 1937).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 39m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
10 reels

Articles

I Love You Again


Amnesia, often used as a device for heavy melodrama, is given a humorous spin in I Love You Again, a 1940 screwball comedy starring one of Hollywood's most popular screen teams of all time. William Powell stars as an upright small-town citizen, the very model of sobriety and civic responsibility, who receives a blow to the head and discovers he has been suffering from amnesia for nearly a decade. His true identity, it turns out, is a con man with a long history of scheming and scamming. Finding himself solidly in the money, he decides to keep up the pretense of being the staid Rotary Club type long enough to take the money and run, but he soon "meets" his wife (Myrna Loy). Although they fell in love and married during his amnesiac phase, she has grown bored with being married to a stuffed shirt and plans to divorce him. He sets out to court her all over again, and she begins to suspect his true identity. It all works out on the side of happily ever after, but not before another blow to the head adds a further twist to this wacky Jekyll-and-Hyde tale.

The plot of I Love You Again was rather improbable, but audiences didn't mind a bit, as long as they could spend a couple of hours in the company of Loy and Powell. The two first acted together in Manhattan Melodrama (1934), with Loy playing the object of affection of both gangster Clark Gable and his boyhood pal, district attorney Powell. But the true spark was ignited when they were cast as the hard-drinking, bantering couple Nick and Nora Charles in the film version of Dashiell Hammett's The Thin Man (1934). At this point in her career, Loy had just recently begun to emerge from her early typecasting as exotic ethnic women - often playing femme fatales with names like Coco, Yasmani and Mulatta - despite her background as a middle-class WASP girl from Montana. With the advent of sound she began to get better, more suitable roles as witty, modern urban women.

Powell had a long career stretching back to the early 1920s, generally as a slick, mustachioed sophisticate and occasional villain. He had begun to achieve stardom as the debonair sleuth Philo Vance in a series of pictures at Warner Brothers. But their chemistry together as Nick and Nora and their easy handling of both the mystery and comedy elements of Hammett's story brought them both to a new level and established a partnership that would span 13 years and 14 pictures, six of them in the Thin Man series alone. Director W.S. "Woody" Van Dyke, who first brought them together, directed them in six films, including I Love You Again.

When this picture was made, Powell was just bouncing back after a rough patch in his life. While still grieving over the untimely death of his lover, Jean Harlow, in 1937, he was diagnosed with colon cancer. Although he beat the disease, his recovery and the emotional stress he suffered kept him off the screen for a year (which was unusual in a time when stars typically cranked out multiple pictures annually). He re-emerged with his eighth teaming with Loy in Another Thin Man (1939), followed the next year by this successful marital comedy with its amnesia theme.

Just prior to production on this movie, Loy had taken a brief vacation from her home studio, MGM, to visit Montana with her mother (and a break from her marriage to producer Arthur Hornblow, Jr., which was beginning to show signs of the discord that would lead to a 1942 divorce). She returned from her trip expecting to begin work on Joseph Mankiewicz's film adaptation of Robert Sherwood's hit play The Road to Rome. Clark Gable (another popular and frequent Loy co-star) was to have played Hannibal, and Loy was looking forward to the role of the Roman senator's wife who beguiles him. But the play's anti-war message was considered a losing proposition for a world plunged into conflict and a country on the verge of joining it, so the project was scrapped. Instead, Loy found herself in this comedy, with the great compensation of working with Powell again. "I never enjoyed my work more than when I worked with William Powell," she later said. "He was a brilliant actor, a delightful companion, a great friend and above all, a true gentleman."

The gentleman, however, was not above pulling a prank on his old friend to surprise her for her birthday. Powell conspired with the director and crew to run the camera with no film while he inexplicably began blowing his lines. Pretending to be rattled and in need of a private rehearsal, he pulled Loy to a corner of the big soundstage. As they approached a tall black canvas flat, it began to shake and looked like it was falling towards them just as the lights suddenly went out. The terrified Loy screamed in the blackness, but nothing happened. And when the lights came back on she saw, where the flat had been, a decorated table with a huge birthday cake.

I Love You Again was such a success the studio decided to capitalize on the formula by bringing Loy and Powell back together for Love Crazy (1941), in which he pretends to be insane in order to prevent their divorce.

Director: W.S. Van Dyke II
Producer: Lawrence Weingarten
Screenplay: Charles Lederer, George Oppenheimer, Harry Kurnitz
Cinematography: Oliver T. Marsh
Editing: Gene Ruggiero
Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons
Original Music: Franz Waxman
Cast: William Powell (Larry Wilson, aka George Carey), Myrna Loy (Kay Wilson), Frank McHugh (Doc Ryan), Edmund Lowe (Duke Sheldon), Carl "Alfalfa" Switzer (Leonard Larkspur, Jr.).
BW-100m. Closed captioning.

by Rob Nixon
I Love You Again

I Love You Again

Amnesia, often used as a device for heavy melodrama, is given a humorous spin in I Love You Again, a 1940 screwball comedy starring one of Hollywood's most popular screen teams of all time. William Powell stars as an upright small-town citizen, the very model of sobriety and civic responsibility, who receives a blow to the head and discovers he has been suffering from amnesia for nearly a decade. His true identity, it turns out, is a con man with a long history of scheming and scamming. Finding himself solidly in the money, he decides to keep up the pretense of being the staid Rotary Club type long enough to take the money and run, but he soon "meets" his wife (Myrna Loy). Although they fell in love and married during his amnesiac phase, she has grown bored with being married to a stuffed shirt and plans to divorce him. He sets out to court her all over again, and she begins to suspect his true identity. It all works out on the side of happily ever after, but not before another blow to the head adds a further twist to this wacky Jekyll-and-Hyde tale. The plot of I Love You Again was rather improbable, but audiences didn't mind a bit, as long as they could spend a couple of hours in the company of Loy and Powell. The two first acted together in Manhattan Melodrama (1934), with Loy playing the object of affection of both gangster Clark Gable and his boyhood pal, district attorney Powell. But the true spark was ignited when they were cast as the hard-drinking, bantering couple Nick and Nora Charles in the film version of Dashiell Hammett's The Thin Man (1934). At this point in her career, Loy had just recently begun to emerge from her early typecasting as exotic ethnic women - often playing femme fatales with names like Coco, Yasmani and Mulatta - despite her background as a middle-class WASP girl from Montana. With the advent of sound she began to get better, more suitable roles as witty, modern urban women. Powell had a long career stretching back to the early 1920s, generally as a slick, mustachioed sophisticate and occasional villain. He had begun to achieve stardom as the debonair sleuth Philo Vance in a series of pictures at Warner Brothers. But their chemistry together as Nick and Nora and their easy handling of both the mystery and comedy elements of Hammett's story brought them both to a new level and established a partnership that would span 13 years and 14 pictures, six of them in the Thin Man series alone. Director W.S. "Woody" Van Dyke, who first brought them together, directed them in six films, including I Love You Again. When this picture was made, Powell was just bouncing back after a rough patch in his life. While still grieving over the untimely death of his lover, Jean Harlow, in 1937, he was diagnosed with colon cancer. Although he beat the disease, his recovery and the emotional stress he suffered kept him off the screen for a year (which was unusual in a time when stars typically cranked out multiple pictures annually). He re-emerged with his eighth teaming with Loy in Another Thin Man (1939), followed the next year by this successful marital comedy with its amnesia theme. Just prior to production on this movie, Loy had taken a brief vacation from her home studio, MGM, to visit Montana with her mother (and a break from her marriage to producer Arthur Hornblow, Jr., which was beginning to show signs of the discord that would lead to a 1942 divorce). She returned from her trip expecting to begin work on Joseph Mankiewicz's film adaptation of Robert Sherwood's hit play The Road to Rome. Clark Gable (another popular and frequent Loy co-star) was to have played Hannibal, and Loy was looking forward to the role of the Roman senator's wife who beguiles him. But the play's anti-war message was considered a losing proposition for a world plunged into conflict and a country on the verge of joining it, so the project was scrapped. Instead, Loy found herself in this comedy, with the great compensation of working with Powell again. "I never enjoyed my work more than when I worked with William Powell," she later said. "He was a brilliant actor, a delightful companion, a great friend and above all, a true gentleman." The gentleman, however, was not above pulling a prank on his old friend to surprise her for her birthday. Powell conspired with the director and crew to run the camera with no film while he inexplicably began blowing his lines. Pretending to be rattled and in need of a private rehearsal, he pulled Loy to a corner of the big soundstage. As they approached a tall black canvas flat, it began to shake and looked like it was falling towards them just as the lights suddenly went out. The terrified Loy screamed in the blackness, but nothing happened. And when the lights came back on she saw, where the flat had been, a decorated table with a huge birthday cake. I Love You Again was such a success the studio decided to capitalize on the formula by bringing Loy and Powell back together for Love Crazy (1941), in which he pretends to be insane in order to prevent their divorce. Director: W.S. Van Dyke II Producer: Lawrence Weingarten Screenplay: Charles Lederer, George Oppenheimer, Harry Kurnitz Cinematography: Oliver T. Marsh Editing: Gene Ruggiero Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons Original Music: Franz Waxman Cast: William Powell (Larry Wilson, aka George Carey), Myrna Loy (Kay Wilson), Frank McHugh (Doc Ryan), Edmund Lowe (Duke Sheldon), Carl "Alfalfa" Switzer (Leonard Larkspur, Jr.). BW-100m. Closed captioning. by Rob Nixon

I Love You Again - Myrna Loy & William Powell in I LOVE YOU AGAIN on DVD


You know you're in a screwball comedy when William Powell starts things off by ordering a ginger-ale-with-grape-juice. William Powell?? Is he out of his mind?? Well, yes, as it turns out. Soon enough, Powell gets knocked on the head; when he comes to, he doesn't remember anything of the past nine years. Turns out he'd had amnesia during those years due to a previous bonk on the head, and only now has his true identity - a slick, heavy-drinking con artist - returned. The problem is that he has to wing it as he learns that in his alternate existence he was an irritatingly prim, teetotaling dullard, running for the chamber of commerce on a temperance platform, and married to a knockout (Myrna Loy) who has been fighting to get a divorce because she finds him boring.

Of course, when Powell gets his (new) first look at Loy, he falls head over heels and fights to win her back again. We know where things will end up, but it's fun to watch Loy repel his advances so heartily before she is won over by his playful sophistication. "Can you imagine?" Powell says to his sidekick Frank McHugh, "I meet a girl, and in 20 minutes, she's gonna divorce me!"

Powell and Loy co-starred in 13 films, six of them Thin Man movies. Five of the other seven are in Warner Home Video's new Myrna Loy and William Powell Collection, including Manhattan Melodrama (1934), Evelyn Prentice (1934), Double Wedding (1937), I Love You Again (1940) and Love Crazy (1941). I Love You Again is perhaps the best of the bunch. It's a fizzy concoction, best watched with a martini or glass of champagne in hand. The clever plotting and dialogue keep things moving, and the picture never runs out of steam through its 99 minutes.

Given Powell's screen persona, it's especially amusing to see him "force" himself to drink when he's pretending to still be the teetotaler. "The doctor said that I should have a drink every 15 minutes," he explains, never bothering to add that his "doctor" is in fact his accomplice Frank McHugh, with whom he plans to fleece the town's jet-set out of untold thousands. At one point someone calls McHugh a "wisecracking stooge," a very accurate description!

Also in the cast are lovable character actors like Charles Halton, Charles Lane and Carl Switzer, best known as "Alfalfa" from Our Gang. Also look for Robert Blake (another Our Gang member) as a 7-year-old scene-stealer named Edward Littlejohn, Jr.

And for those classic movie fans who always roll their eyes when someone on screen calls out to hurry and fetch some "hot water" anytime a character gets injured or sick, there's an exchange here that will you leave you laughing.

I Love You Again is available only as part of this five-title collection, which has been packaged in an attractive fold-out case with nice photos of Loy and Powell throughout. All the films come with various extras, though no commentaries. I Love You Again comes with a fair MGM cartoon, Tom Turkey and His Harmonica Humdingers (1940), a very good "Crime Does Not Pay" short entitled Jack Pot (1940), starring Tom Neal, and a trailer. Picture and sound are tops.

For more information about I Love You Again, visit Warner Video. To order I Love You Again, go to TCM Shopping.

by Jeremy Arnold

I Love You Again - Myrna Loy & William Powell in I LOVE YOU AGAIN on DVD

You know you're in a screwball comedy when William Powell starts things off by ordering a ginger-ale-with-grape-juice. William Powell?? Is he out of his mind?? Well, yes, as it turns out. Soon enough, Powell gets knocked on the head; when he comes to, he doesn't remember anything of the past nine years. Turns out he'd had amnesia during those years due to a previous bonk on the head, and only now has his true identity - a slick, heavy-drinking con artist - returned. The problem is that he has to wing it as he learns that in his alternate existence he was an irritatingly prim, teetotaling dullard, running for the chamber of commerce on a temperance platform, and married to a knockout (Myrna Loy) who has been fighting to get a divorce because she finds him boring. Of course, when Powell gets his (new) first look at Loy, he falls head over heels and fights to win her back again. We know where things will end up, but it's fun to watch Loy repel his advances so heartily before she is won over by his playful sophistication. "Can you imagine?" Powell says to his sidekick Frank McHugh, "I meet a girl, and in 20 minutes, she's gonna divorce me!" Powell and Loy co-starred in 13 films, six of them Thin Man movies. Five of the other seven are in Warner Home Video's new Myrna Loy and William Powell Collection, including Manhattan Melodrama (1934), Evelyn Prentice (1934), Double Wedding (1937), I Love You Again (1940) and Love Crazy (1941). I Love You Again is perhaps the best of the bunch. It's a fizzy concoction, best watched with a martini or glass of champagne in hand. The clever plotting and dialogue keep things moving, and the picture never runs out of steam through its 99 minutes. Given Powell's screen persona, it's especially amusing to see him "force" himself to drink when he's pretending to still be the teetotaler. "The doctor said that I should have a drink every 15 minutes," he explains, never bothering to add that his "doctor" is in fact his accomplice Frank McHugh, with whom he plans to fleece the town's jet-set out of untold thousands. At one point someone calls McHugh a "wisecracking stooge," a very accurate description! Also in the cast are lovable character actors like Charles Halton, Charles Lane and Carl Switzer, best known as "Alfalfa" from Our Gang. Also look for Robert Blake (another Our Gang member) as a 7-year-old scene-stealer named Edward Littlejohn, Jr. And for those classic movie fans who always roll their eyes when someone on screen calls out to hurry and fetch some "hot water" anytime a character gets injured or sick, there's an exchange here that will you leave you laughing. I Love You Again is available only as part of this five-title collection, which has been packaged in an attractive fold-out case with nice photos of Loy and Powell throughout. All the films come with various extras, though no commentaries. I Love You Again comes with a fair MGM cartoon, Tom Turkey and His Harmonica Humdingers (1940), a very good "Crime Does Not Pay" short entitled Jack Pot (1940), starring Tom Neal, and a trailer. Picture and sound are tops. For more information about I Love You Again, visit Warner Video. To order I Love You Again, go to TCM Shopping. by Jeremy Arnold

Quotes

Where did you learn to dance like this?
- Kay Wilson
By mail.
- George Carey
Listen, Lady. I generally never sock a dame. But I'm inclined to make an exception of you.
- Duke Sheldon

Trivia

Notes

In 1941, Cary Grant and Myrna Loy starred in a Lux Radio Theatre version of the story, and in 1948, Ann Sothern and William Powell starred in another Lux Radio Theatre version.