Young Doctors In Love


1h 36m 1982

Brief Synopsis

The new group of interns at City Hospital struggle to survive their first year of residency. One of the new doctors cannot handle the sight of blood, another has a drug problem, but the main distraction from their medical training is all of the sex they are having with each other.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1982

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 36m

Synopsis

The new group of interns at City Hospital struggle to survive their first year of residency. One of the new doctors cannot handle the sight of blood, another has a drug problem, but the main distraction from their medical training is all of the sex they are having with each other.

Crew

Nick Abdo

Associate Producer

Philip Abramson

Set Decorator

Richard Dean Anderson

Other

Richard L Anderson

Sound Editor

Bill Badalato

Production Manager

Michael Balker

Wardrobe

Fred Baron

Location Manager

Janet Bartels-vandagriff

Assistant Editor

Charles Bornstein

Assistant Editor

Elizabeth Bousman

Other

Tracy Bousman

Art Director

Jerry Bruckheimer

Producer

James Christopher

Sound Editor

Richard F Clark

Video

Shirley Crawford

Hair

Wes Dawn

Makeup

Don Digirolamo

Sound

Curtis Dixon

Special Effects

John Dunn

Sound Editor

Stephen P Dunn

Assistant Director

Michael Elias

Screenplay

Chuck Ellison

Assistant Editor

Rich Eustis

Screenplay

William Flores

Wardrobe

Stanley Frazen

Editing

Jeffrey Ganz

Associate Producer

John Gilman

Video

Robert W Glass

Sound

Michael Grillo

Assistant Director

Dov Hoenig

Editor

C Robert Holloway

Location Manager

Joe Hosking

Location Manager

Maurice Jarre

Music

James Kail

Makeup

Jerry King

Key Grip

Robert Knudson

Sound

Brice Mack

Camera Operator

Henry Mancini

Song

Mark Mangini

Sound Editor

Garry Marshall

Executive Producer

David Mccann

Post-Production Supervisor

Julene Mckinney

Wardrobe

Marina Pedraza

Hair

John Perry

Costume Supervisor

Don Peterman

Director Of Photography

Don Peterman

Dp/Cinematographer

Polly Platt

Production Designer

Efraim Reuveni

Assistant Editor

Donna Roberts

Wardrobe

Walter Scott

Stunt Coordinator

Ron Smith

Casting

Lynn Stalmaster

Casting

David Stone

Sound Editor

Jill Taggart

Sound Editor

Margaret Tarry

Script Supervisor

Michael Tronick

Music Editor

Joe Valentine

Other

Mark Wade

Props

Keith Webster

Sound

Keith Wester

Sound

Bob Willard

Special Effects

Sidney Wolinsky

Editing

Larry Wood

Video

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1982

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 36m

Articles

Hamilton Camp (1934-2005)


Hamilton Camp, the diminutive yet effervescent actor and singer-songwriter, who spent nearly his entire life in show business, including several appearances in both television and films, died of a heart attack on October 2 at his Los Angeles home. He was 70.

He was born October 30, 1934, in London, England. After World War II, he moved to Canada and then to Long Beach with his mother and sister, where the siblings performed in USO shows. In 1946, he made his first movie, Bedlam starring Boris Karloff as an extra (as Bobby Camp) and continued in that vein until he played Thorpe, one of Dean Stockwell's classmates in Kim (1950).

After Kim he received some more slightly prominent parts in films: a messenger boy in Titanic (1953); and a mailroom attendant in Executive Suite (1954), but overall, Camp was never a steadily working child actor.

Camp relocated to Chicago in the late '50s and rediscovered his childhood passion - music. He began playing in small clubs around the Chicago area, and he struck oil when he partnered with a New York based folk artist, Bob Gibson in 1961. The pair worked in clubs all over the midwest and they soon became known for their tight vocal harmonies and Gibson's 12-string guitar style. Late in 1961, they recorded an album - Gibson and Camp at the Gate of Horn, the Gate of Horn being the most renowned music venue in Chicago for the burgeoning folk scene. The record may have aged a bit over the years, but it is admired as an important progress in folk music by most scholars, particularly as a missing link between the classic era of Woody Guthrie and the modern singer-songwriter genre populated by Bob Dylan and Joan Baez.

Gibson and Camp would split within two years, and after recording some albums as a solo artist and a brief stint with Chicago's famed Second City improvisational comedy troupe, Camp struck out on his own to work as an actor in Los Angeles. His changed his name to Hamilton from Bob, and despite his lack of vertical presence (he stood only 5-foot-2), his boundless energy and quick wit made him handy to guest star in a string of familiar sitcoms of the late '60s: The Monkees, Bewitched, and Love, American Style. By the '70s there was no stopping him as he appeared on virtually every popular comedy of the day: The Mary Tyler Moore Show, M*A*S*H, Laverne & Shirley, Three's Company, and WKRP in Cincinnati.

Eventually, Camp's film roles improved too, and he did his best film work in the latter stages of his career: Blake Edward's undisciplined but still funny S.O.B. (1981); Paul Bartel's glorious cult comedy Eating Raoul (1982); and Clint Eastwood's jazz biopic on Charlie Parker Bird (1988). Among his recent work was a guest spot last season as a carpenter on Desperate Housewives, and his recent completion of a Las Vegas based comedy Hard Four which is currently in post-production. Camp is survived by six children and thirteen grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Hamilton Camp (1934-2005)

Hamilton Camp (1934-2005)

Hamilton Camp, the diminutive yet effervescent actor and singer-songwriter, who spent nearly his entire life in show business, including several appearances in both television and films, died of a heart attack on October 2 at his Los Angeles home. He was 70. He was born October 30, 1934, in London, England. After World War II, he moved to Canada and then to Long Beach with his mother and sister, where the siblings performed in USO shows. In 1946, he made his first movie, Bedlam starring Boris Karloff as an extra (as Bobby Camp) and continued in that vein until he played Thorpe, one of Dean Stockwell's classmates in Kim (1950). After Kim he received some more slightly prominent parts in films: a messenger boy in Titanic (1953); and a mailroom attendant in Executive Suite (1954), but overall, Camp was never a steadily working child actor. Camp relocated to Chicago in the late '50s and rediscovered his childhood passion - music. He began playing in small clubs around the Chicago area, and he struck oil when he partnered with a New York based folk artist, Bob Gibson in 1961. The pair worked in clubs all over the midwest and they soon became known for their tight vocal harmonies and Gibson's 12-string guitar style. Late in 1961, they recorded an album - Gibson and Camp at the Gate of Horn, the Gate of Horn being the most renowned music venue in Chicago for the burgeoning folk scene. The record may have aged a bit over the years, but it is admired as an important progress in folk music by most scholars, particularly as a missing link between the classic era of Woody Guthrie and the modern singer-songwriter genre populated by Bob Dylan and Joan Baez. Gibson and Camp would split within two years, and after recording some albums as a solo artist and a brief stint with Chicago's famed Second City improvisational comedy troupe, Camp struck out on his own to work as an actor in Los Angeles. His changed his name to Hamilton from Bob, and despite his lack of vertical presence (he stood only 5-foot-2), his boundless energy and quick wit made him handy to guest star in a string of familiar sitcoms of the late '60s: The Monkees, Bewitched, and Love, American Style. By the '70s there was no stopping him as he appeared on virtually every popular comedy of the day: The Mary Tyler Moore Show, M*A*S*H, Laverne & Shirley, Three's Company, and WKRP in Cincinnati. Eventually, Camp's film roles improved too, and he did his best film work in the latter stages of his career: Blake Edward's undisciplined but still funny S.O.B. (1981); Paul Bartel's glorious cult comedy Eating Raoul (1982); and Clint Eastwood's jazz biopic on Charlie Parker Bird (1988). Among his recent work was a guest spot last season as a carpenter on Desperate Housewives, and his recent completion of a Las Vegas based comedy Hard Four which is currently in post-production. Camp is survived by six children and thirteen grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States July 1982

Released in United States Summer July 16, 1982

Re-released in United States on Video April 18, 1995

Re-released in United States on Video April 18, 1995

Released in United States July 1982

Released in United States Summer July 16, 1982