The Lost Boys


1h 32m 1987

Brief Synopsis

Strange events threaten an entire family when two brothers move with their divorced mother to a California town where the local teenage gang turns out to be a pack of vampires.

Film Details

Also Known As
Génération perdue, Jóvenes ocultos, Lost Boys
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Horror
Thriller
Teens
Release Date
1987
Production Company
Robert Scarborough
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Santa Cruz, California, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 32m

Synopsis

Strange events threaten an entire family when two brothers move with their divorced mother to a California town where the local teenage gang turns out to be a pack of vampires.

Crew

Donald Abblett

Other

Dale Alexander

Grip

Dick Alexander

Sound

Eric D Andersen

Camera Operator

James M Arnett

Second Unit Director

Brent Baker

Special Effects

Ken Ballantine

Other

David Banks

Song

Jimmy Barnes

Song Performer

Jimmy Barnes

Song

Bill Beasley

Assistant Director

Susan Becker

Costume Designer

Michael Been

Song

Garry Gary Beers

Song

Harvey Bernhard

Producer

Sandy Berumen

Stunts

Michael Bigelow

Motion Control

Michael W Blymyer

Rigging Gaffer

Jeffrey Boam

Screenplay

May Boss

Stunts

Judith Bouley

Casting

Christopher Bowman

Stunts

Janet Brady

Stunts

Eric Brevig

Visual Effects Designer

Eric Brevig

Visual Effects Supervisor

Eddie Brigati

Song

Paul Brooks

Song

Robert Brown

Editor

Everett Burrell

Special Effects

David Burton

Stunts

Jeff Bushelman

Sound Editor

Jodie Mae Caldwell

Stunts

Charles L Campbell

Sound Editor

Greg Cannom

Makeup

Timmy Cappello

Song Performer

Larry Carow

Sound Editor

John Carroll

Special Effects

Felix Cavaliere

Song

Ray Chambers

Foreman

Michael Chapman

Dp/Cinematographer

Michael Chapman

Director Of Photography

Doc D Charbonneau

Stunts

Bob Chase

Costume Supervisor

Charles Chiodo

Consultant

Craig S Clark

Sound Editor

Bob Clearmountain

Song

Michele Comris

Caterer

Lamont Cox

Stunts

Robert Crosby

Boom Operator

Roger Daltrey

Song Performer

Bob Daly

Production Assistant

Robert A Daly

Production Associate

Mark Damon

Co-Executive Producer

Huw Davies

Location Manager

Gary Charles Davis

Stunt Coordinator

Run Dmc

Song Performer

Scott Dockstader

Stunts

Richard Donner

Executive Producer

The Doors

Song

Marion Dougherty

Casting

Tom Duffield

Art Director

Patrick Duffy

Assistant Director

Louis L Edemann

Sound Editor

Keith Edmier

Special Effects

Donald Elliott

Special Effects

Earl Ellis

Special Effects

Whitey Ellison

Transportation Coordinator

Bill Erikson

Stunt Coordinator

Geno Escarrega

Production Associate

Jennifer Evans

Other

Rosemarie Fall

Costume Supervisor

Andrew Farriss

Song

John Farriss

Song

Tim Farriss

Song

Michael Ferriter

Visual Effects

Janice Fischer

From Story

Janice Fischer

Story By

Janice Fischer

Screenplay

Bill Foertsch

Special Effects

Bill Forsche

Makeup

Richard C Franklin

Sound Editor

Les Fresholtz

Sound

Dino Ganziano

Hair

Frank Gardner

Caterer

Bruce Gattenbein

Stunts

Michael A. Genne

Camera Operator

Sandra Gimpel

Stunts

Chris Goehe

Special Effects

Anthony Goldschmidt

Titles

Paul Goldsmith

Dp/Cinematographer

Paul Goldsmith

Director Of Photography

James Goodwin

Song

Danny Gould

Song

Lou Gramm

Song

Lou Gramm

Song Performer

Tracy Granger

Assistant Editor

James Green

Motion Control

Dr. Morton K Greenspoon

Consultant

Linda Griffith

Rights & Clearances

Dennis Grisco

Animal Trainer

William S Grisco

Animal Trainer

Jodi Guber

Production Assistant

Kim Guthrie

Assistant Camera Operator

Jeff Habberstad

Stunts

Randy Hall

Stunts

Donna Hart

Other

Clarence Henry

Song

Clarence Henry

Song Performer

Larry Hezzelwood

Assistant Camera Operator

Beau Hill

Song

Frank Holgate

Photography

Steve Holladay

Stunts

John Hughes

Photography

Michael Hutchence

Song

Clint Hutchinson

Other

John W. Hyde

Co-Executive Producer

Dream Quest Images

Special Effects

James Jeremias

Story By

James Jeremias

Screenplay

James Jeremias

From Story

Eric Jewett

Assistant Director

Elton John

Song

Jack Johnson

Visual Effects

Madonna Joy

Stunts

Paul Kaplansky

Assistant

Kenneth Karman

Music Editor

Gene Kearney

Key Grip

Jan Kemper

Script Supervisor

Paul Kennerly

Song

Gary Kieldrup

Property Master Assistant

Jennifer Kingry

Assistant Director

Justin Klarenbeck

Motion Control

Kim Koscki

Stunts

Leslie J Kovacs

Gaffer

Steve Laporte

Makeup

Tom Lassally

Production Assistant

Andrew Lauren

Production Assistant

David Lebell

Stunts

Gene Lebell

Stunts

Doug Lefler

Consultant

Robert Lemer

Location Manager

Larry Lennert

Other

Gail Levin

Casting

Joe Madalena

Location Manager

Michael Mainieri

Song

Ray Manzarek

Song

Sam Marquez

Special Effects

Bruce Martin

Song

Gail Martin-sheridan

Production Accountant

Tracey Mccampbell

Assistant Editor

Tim Mchugh

Photography

Gerald Mcmann

Song

Gerald Mcmann

Song Performer

Benny Mcnulty

Electrician

John C. Meier

Stunts

Marie Melendez

Assistant

Pat Moran

Song

Timothy J Moran

Special Effects

Robert Munoz

Best Boy Grip

Chuck Neely

Sound Editor

Ve Neill

Makeup

Bob Neilson

Transportation Captain

Mel Neiman

Sound Effects

Thomas Newman

Music

Larry Nicholas

Stunts

Alan Nineberg

Adr Editor

Jane O'neal

Photography

Michael O'shea

Camera Operator

Larry Odien

Special Effects

Grant Olson

Craft Service

Daniel L Ondrejko

Other

Mark Opitz

Song

Michael Papale

Music

Kirk Pengilly

Song

Bill Perry

Stunts

Joe Perry

Song

Bill Petrotta

Property Master

Chuck Picerni Jr.

Stunts

Phil Pickett

Song

Dan Plum

Stunts

Bernie Pock

Stunts

Vern Poore

Sound

Travis Powell

Production Assistant

Jim Prior

Assistant Editor

K G Ramsey

Hair

Daniel Quinton Reilly

Key Grip

Ross Reynolds

Helicopter Pilot

Richard Rippel

Visual Effects

Brian A Robertson

Song

Alex Rodriguez

Other

Bill Roe

Assistant Camera Operator

Rod Rogers

Adr Editor

Pat Romano

Stunts

David Ronne

Sound

Laurie Ryan

Other

Peter Salim

Camera Operator

Lief Sand

Driver

Robert Scarborough

Cable Operator

Charles Schuman

Photography

Robert Scifo

Matte Painter

Film Details

Also Known As
Génération perdue, Jóvenes ocultos, Lost Boys
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Horror
Thriller
Teens
Release Date
1987
Production Company
Robert Scarborough
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Santa Cruz, California, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 32m

Articles

Lost Boys, The - The Lost Boys (Special Edition) on DVD


Packed up by their divorced mother Lucy (Dianne Wiest), brothers Michael (Jason Patric) and Sam (Corey Haim) move to the "murder capital of the world," Santa Clara, California. A netherworld of boardwalks and beach bums, the town boasts an eccentric rogues' gallery of residents including Lucy's father (Barnard Hughes), video store owner Max (Edward Herrmann) who sets his sights on Lucy, and a nocturnal gang of teens led by the charismatic, bleach-blond David (Kiefer Sutherland). Lured by mysterious vixen Star (Jami Gertz), Michael falls in with David's pack only to learn that he's being gradually turned into a vampire. Alarmed by his brother's change in personality, Sam seeks help from a pair of comic book hounds/vampire hunters, the Frog Brothers (Corey Feldman and Jamison Newlander), though none of the adults seems to notice as a teen/bloodsucker war erupts.

Barely serviceable as a horror film, The Lost Boys functions far better as a pop culture black comedy, sort of a nastier John Hughes film with pretty photography. As with 8MM and Flatliners, Schumacher blunts most of the visceral potential in his script by focusing more on aesthetics, though thankfully not as harmfully as in those other two cases. Reminiscent of music videos but wholly influential in its own right, the film looks marvelous with slick scope photography and some of the finest use of dark negative space you'll ever see. Something of a "you had to be there" experience, the film features an exceptional rock/pop soundtrack (with some orchestral help from a young Thomas Newman, whose score remains sadly unavailable to this day) and a bizarre but effective roster of actors. Utilizing his brat packers far better than his earlier St. Elmo's Fire, Schumacher coaxes excellent work from the two Coreys in their most iconic performances; though offscreen for much of the film, Sutherland and his cohorts (including a pre-Bill and Ted Alex Winter) make a striking impression despite their dubious fashion choices. (Even in 1987, Weist's compliments to their outfits drew guffaws from audiences.) In one of his earliest roles, Patric does fine with his part (though he later brushed the film aside compared to his serious later work) and the adult performers offer nicely shaded characterizations. Only Gertz (Patric's costar from the previous year's Solarbabies) stumbles with a sketchy character whose lack of development leaves her a frustrating cipher. She looks great, but that's about it.

Perhaps the mildest R-rated horror film ever made (indeed, its one scene of gushing blood looks more like muddy tap water), The Lost Boys also makes interesting but muted use of its Peter Pan analogies, with Lucy's potential Wendy role playing nicely against the titular characters whose adolescent development clashes with their oddly asexual behavior. Many perceptive viewers noted a not-so-subtle gender role subtext to the film, particularly in the character of Sam and the use of a pretty girl to lure a teen boy in with a gang of trendy, fashion-dressing bloodsuckers. (However, as far as Schumacher films go, the implications here are a lot more subtle than, say, Batman and Robin.) In retrospect, it's easy to view the film as part of a homosexual panic horror trilogy from the `80s along with Fright Night and A Nightmare on Elm Street 2: Freddy's Revenge, all of which chart a similar trajectory involving male teen heroes whose confused sexuality is channeled into curiosity over a supernatural presence invading their home.

A notoriously difficult title to transfer to home video, The Lost Boys fares surprisingly well in its double-disc special edition incarnation. The very wide anamorphic transfer looks sharper and cleaner than any other version around (and significantly fresher than it did in theaters), while the 5.1 mix does what it can with a fairly standard sound design. Schumacher provides a solo audio commentary in which, like his early tracks, he largely focuses on his own directorial decisions without going too much into the nuts and bolts of how the film came to be or how drastically it changed from its original conception (more Peter Pan, less MTV). He also leaves many blank gaps in his chat, so keep the fast-forward button handy.

The second disc kicks off with The Lost Boys: A Retrospective, a 25-minute featurette in which Schumacher, both Coreys, Herrmann, producer Richard Donner (originally slated as director), Sutherland, and Newlander recall working on the film with affectionate detail. Inside the Vampire's Cave carries over the participants for four tiny extra featurettes, talking about the production design, the conception of vampires, the comedy/horror aspects, and a potential sequel involving a gang of biker girl vampires. (Oy!) Vamping Out: The Undead Creations of Greg Cannom focuses on the effects work with an emphasis on the vampire make-up, which went on to influence decades of future bloodsucker pop culture (including Buffy the Vampire Slayer, which owes much of its look and lingo to this film). The Return of Sam and the Frog Brothers: The 2 Coreys and Jamison Newlander reunites the Coreys and Newlander for a multi-angle commentary track in which they observe themselves from a vantage point years later.

An interesting reel of deleted and extended scenes is mostly filler, though Weist and Herrmann get a couple of extra scenes expanding on their relationship. An extra bit with Hughes also does a more thorough job of foreshadowing his classic closing line, and Patric and Gertz get a silly extended love scene primarily focusing on the former's jeans. Other extras include the excellent theatrical trailer, a video for "Lost in the Shadows" (presumably the one for "Good Times" proved too difficult to clear), a photo gallery, and an interactive map charting the various vampire myths throughout the world.

For more information about The Lost Boys (Special Edition), visit Warner Video. To order The Lost Boys, go to TCM Shopping.

by Nathaniel Thompson
Lost Boys, The - The Lost Boys (Special Edition) On Dvd

Lost Boys, The - The Lost Boys (Special Edition) on DVD

Packed up by their divorced mother Lucy (Dianne Wiest), brothers Michael (Jason Patric) and Sam (Corey Haim) move to the "murder capital of the world," Santa Clara, California. A netherworld of boardwalks and beach bums, the town boasts an eccentric rogues' gallery of residents including Lucy's father (Barnard Hughes), video store owner Max (Edward Herrmann) who sets his sights on Lucy, and a nocturnal gang of teens led by the charismatic, bleach-blond David (Kiefer Sutherland). Lured by mysterious vixen Star (Jami Gertz), Michael falls in with David's pack only to learn that he's being gradually turned into a vampire. Alarmed by his brother's change in personality, Sam seeks help from a pair of comic book hounds/vampire hunters, the Frog Brothers (Corey Feldman and Jamison Newlander), though none of the adults seems to notice as a teen/bloodsucker war erupts. Barely serviceable as a horror film, The Lost Boys functions far better as a pop culture black comedy, sort of a nastier John Hughes film with pretty photography. As with 8MM and Flatliners, Schumacher blunts most of the visceral potential in his script by focusing more on aesthetics, though thankfully not as harmfully as in those other two cases. Reminiscent of music videos but wholly influential in its own right, the film looks marvelous with slick scope photography and some of the finest use of dark negative space you'll ever see. Something of a "you had to be there" experience, the film features an exceptional rock/pop soundtrack (with some orchestral help from a young Thomas Newman, whose score remains sadly unavailable to this day) and a bizarre but effective roster of actors. Utilizing his brat packers far better than his earlier St. Elmo's Fire, Schumacher coaxes excellent work from the two Coreys in their most iconic performances; though offscreen for much of the film, Sutherland and his cohorts (including a pre-Bill and Ted Alex Winter) make a striking impression despite their dubious fashion choices. (Even in 1987, Weist's compliments to their outfits drew guffaws from audiences.) In one of his earliest roles, Patric does fine with his part (though he later brushed the film aside compared to his serious later work) and the adult performers offer nicely shaded characterizations. Only Gertz (Patric's costar from the previous year's Solarbabies) stumbles with a sketchy character whose lack of development leaves her a frustrating cipher. She looks great, but that's about it. Perhaps the mildest R-rated horror film ever made (indeed, its one scene of gushing blood looks more like muddy tap water), The Lost Boys also makes interesting but muted use of its Peter Pan analogies, with Lucy's potential Wendy role playing nicely against the titular characters whose adolescent development clashes with their oddly asexual behavior. Many perceptive viewers noted a not-so-subtle gender role subtext to the film, particularly in the character of Sam and the use of a pretty girl to lure a teen boy in with a gang of trendy, fashion-dressing bloodsuckers. (However, as far as Schumacher films go, the implications here are a lot more subtle than, say, Batman and Robin.) In retrospect, it's easy to view the film as part of a homosexual panic horror trilogy from the `80s along with Fright Night and A Nightmare on Elm Street 2: Freddy's Revenge, all of which chart a similar trajectory involving male teen heroes whose confused sexuality is channeled into curiosity over a supernatural presence invading their home. A notoriously difficult title to transfer to home video, The Lost Boys fares surprisingly well in its double-disc special edition incarnation. The very wide anamorphic transfer looks sharper and cleaner than any other version around (and significantly fresher than it did in theaters), while the 5.1 mix does what it can with a fairly standard sound design. Schumacher provides a solo audio commentary in which, like his early tracks, he largely focuses on his own directorial decisions without going too much into the nuts and bolts of how the film came to be or how drastically it changed from its original conception (more Peter Pan, less MTV). He also leaves many blank gaps in his chat, so keep the fast-forward button handy. The second disc kicks off with The Lost Boys: A Retrospective, a 25-minute featurette in which Schumacher, both Coreys, Herrmann, producer Richard Donner (originally slated as director), Sutherland, and Newlander recall working on the film with affectionate detail. Inside the Vampire's Cave carries over the participants for four tiny extra featurettes, talking about the production design, the conception of vampires, the comedy/horror aspects, and a potential sequel involving a gang of biker girl vampires. (Oy!) Vamping Out: The Undead Creations of Greg Cannom focuses on the effects work with an emphasis on the vampire make-up, which went on to influence decades of future bloodsucker pop culture (including Buffy the Vampire Slayer, which owes much of its look and lingo to this film). The Return of Sam and the Frog Brothers: The 2 Coreys and Jamison Newlander reunites the Coreys and Newlander for a multi-angle commentary track in which they observe themselves from a vantage point years later. An interesting reel of deleted and extended scenes is mostly filler, though Weist and Herrmann get a couple of extra scenes expanding on their relationship. An extra bit with Hughes also does a more thorough job of foreshadowing his classic closing line, and Patric and Gertz get a silly extended love scene primarily focusing on the former's jeans. Other extras include the excellent theatrical trailer, a video for "Lost in the Shadows" (presumably the one for "Good Times" proved too difficult to clear), a photo gallery, and an interactive map charting the various vampire myths throughout the world. For more information about The Lost Boys (Special Edition), visit Warner Video. To order The Lost Boys, go to TCM Shopping. by Nathaniel Thompson

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1997

Released in United States July 17, 1987

Released in United States November 12, 1987

Released in United States Summer July 31, 1987

Re-released in United States October 30, 1987

Shown at WideScreen Film Festival in Los Angeles October 31 - November 16, 1997.

Released in United States 1997 (Shown at WideScreen Film Festival in Los Angeles October 31 - November 16, 1997.)

Released in United States July 17, 1987 (Shown in New York City July 17, 1987.)

Released in United States Summer July 31, 1987

Re-released in United States October 30, 1987 (Los Angeles)

Began shooting June 2, 1986.

Released in United States November 12, 1987