Tombstone


2h 8m 1993

Brief Synopsis

A retired lawman straps on his guns one more time to fight a vicious outlaw band.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Western
Action
Biography
Drama
Historical
Period
Romance
Release Date
1993
Production Company
Brent Brewington
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Tucson, Arizona, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 8m

Synopsis

The life and times of the famous cowboy outlaw turned town-taming marshall, Wyatt Earp. Story focuses on the build up to the gunfight at the OK Corral, located at the outskirts of the town of Tombstone, Arizona.

Crew

George Abos

Wrangler

Oscar Acalixtro

Security

Kate Adams

Apprentice

Charles Adkinson

Carpenter

Ulrika Akander

Adr Editor

Floyd Albee

Assistant Art Director

Demir Alblai

Driver

Sibylle Aldridge

Script Supervisor

Cheyenne Ali

Other

Gina Aller

Set Costumer

Randolph W Andell

Props Assistant

Patricia Androff

Hair Stylist

Matt Araki

Sound

James Ashwill

Foley Mixer

David Atherton

Makeup

Mark Balda

Carpenter

Bill Baldwin

Adr

Robin Baldwin

Wrangler

Perry Barndt

Stunts

Phillip J Bartell

Assistant Editor

Hyatt Bass

Camera

Donah Bassett

Negative Cutting

Matthew Bell

Other

Sheryl Benko

Office Assistant

Dan Bennett

Crane Grip

Tom Benson

Set Designer

Sandy Berman

Foley

George Berndt

Adr Supervisor

Jemison Beshears

Other

Michael Bircumshaw

Casting Associate

Donny Blank

Sound Effects Editor

Tony Boggs

Stunts

John Bramley

Photography

Richard Branca

Consultant

Chris Branham

Stunts

Brent Brewington

Cable Operator

Layne Brightwell

Set Costumer

John W Brilhante

Sound Recordist

Lisa Brooks

Set Production Assistant

Bruce Broughton

Music

Bruce Broughton

Music Producer

Hunter Brown

Other

Joseph Brown

Wrangler

Zane Bruce

Foley Artist

Ted Buford

Driver

Jane Bulmer

Assistant

Kim Burke

Animal Wrangler

Duncan Burns

Dialogue Editor

Hal Burton

Stunts

Reggie Byrum

Other

Gary L Camp

Assistant Camera Operator

Marilyn Carbone

Makeup Artist

Patricia Carlin

Music Editor

Jon Carpenter

Transportation Coordinator

Lynn Carpenter

Driver

Richard Carter

Grip

Jaime Casillas

Other

Kenny Chisholm

Office Assistant

Dinise Chocholousek

Craft Service

Maria Cittadini

Set Costumer

Brad Clark

Wrangler

Simon Coke

Sound Effects Editor

David Cole

Assistant Engineer

William Collins

Medic

Bobbie Collis

Transportation

Jack Collis

Driver

Terry Collis

Unit Production Manager

Stephanie Confesor

Assistant Camera Operator

Paul Coogan

Boom Operator

Jay Coolidge

Assistant Camera Operator

Al Coonrod

Other

Blake Cornett

Assistant Sound Editor

Panos Cosmatos

Video Assist/Playback

Danny Costa

Stunts

Michael Courville

Property Master

Donna Coxon

Art Department Coordinator

Jerry Crandall

Other

Rani Cunningham

Set Costumer

Carla Curry

Assistant Set Decorator

Patrick Cyccone Jr.

Rerecording

Karen Dahl

Makeup Artist

Clifton Dance

Electrician

Blake Danforth

Office Assistant

James Danicic

Other

Sean Daniel

Producer

Gordon Davidson

Dialogue Editor

Gordon Davidson

Dialogue Editor

Keith M Davis

Electrician

David Degeus

Assistant Sound Editor

Bob Deshaine

Adr Mixer

Bob Dewitt

Driver

David Diano

Camera Operator

Nell Dickerson

Art Department Coordinator

Lynn Dodson

Best Boy

Jeff Dolan

Other

Reuben Domingo

Assistant Sound Editor

Edie Douglass

Other

Richard Duran

Stunts

Patrik Dushene

Caterer

Michael Duthie

Editing

Danny Edwards

Driver

Holly W Edwards

Wrangler

Randy Edwards

Driver

Roy Edwards

Driver

John Edwards-younger

Sound Effects Editor

Mark Eggenweiler

Assistant Editor

Bob Elliot

Technical Advisor

Mindy L Elliott

Assistant

Garry Elmendorf

Special Effects

Glenn Enzen

Driver

Eduardo Eparza

Foreman

Gonzalo Espinosa

Other

Greg Evans

On-Set Dresser

Jim Falkenstein

Props Assistant

Jeffrey Falyn

Set Production Assistant

Kip Farnsworth

Stunts

John Fasano

Associate Producer

John Fearn

Wrangler

Buzz Feitshans

Executive Producer

Buzz Feitshans

Camera Operator

Matthew Feitshans

Assistant Director

Rita Fernandez

Casting

Shannon Finch

Set Production Assistant

David Finkelstein

Assistant Sound Editor

George Fleming

Other

Christopher Flick

Foley Editor

Angelina Fontana

Assistant

Lee Foy

Set Costumer

William Fraker

Associate Producer

William Fraker

Other

William Fraker

Director Of Photography

Ruben Fuentes

Video Assist/Playback

Gary Gang

Wrangler

Teri Garland

Stunts

Randy Gerston

Music Supervisor

J B Getzwiller

Stunts

J B Getzwiller

Wrangler

William Getzwiller

Wrangler

William Getzwiller

Transportation Captain

Nerses Gezalyan

Foley Mixer

Fred Gibson

Grip

Kristin R Glover

Camera Operator

Avram D Gold

Adr Editor

Mark Goldblatt

Editing

David Goldstein

Other

Chris Gorak

Art Director

Dan Gorval

Grip

Anthony Gotta

Electrician

Ron Graves

Wrangler

Roberta Grudem

Hair Stylist

Peter Gulick

Other

Patricia Gura

On-Set Dresser

Kathleen Hagan

Makeup Artist

J T Hall

Wrangler

Heath Hammond

Other

Catherine Hardwicke

Production Designer

Jeff Hay

On-Set Dresser

Sanja Milkovic Hays

Set Costumer

Gary Hecker

Foley Artist

Sharon Henning

Driver

Donald Henry

Accountant

Chuck Henson

Driver

Leigh Ann Henson

Driver

Jim Hensz

Set Production Assistant

Claude Hereford

Driver

Holly Hire

Location Casting

Leonard Hirschfield

Director Of Photography

Leonard Hirschfield

Other

Kim Hix

Art Director

Mary Hobin

Costume Supervisor

John Hock

Stunts

Robert G Hoelen

Dolly Grip

Jason Holleb

Art Assistant

Bill Holmquist

Construction Coordinator

Jeff Isaak

Other

John Jackinson

Other

Jim Jacks

Producer

Clinton James

Wrangler

Kevin Jarre

Screenplay

Scott Jellen

Electrician

David Jobe

Foley Mixer

Chris Joehnk

Electrician

Mansur Johnson

Grip

Tiby Katrowitz

Art Assistant

Terry Kauffman

Other

Michael Kaufman

Projectionist

Eugene Kavtz

Driver

Kent Kay

Grip

Nisa Kellner

Set Costumer

Lora Kennedy

Casting

Linda Ketchmark

Set Costumer

Rick Kline

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

J Chris Knagge

Wrangler

Cookie Knapp

Other

Debra Kantor Kohn

Apprentice

Laura Krumholz

Assistant Editor

Bill Ku

Assistant Camera Operator

Matt Kutcher

Special Effects

Jason Lafountain

Props

Jason Lafountain

Props Assistant

Film Details

MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Western
Action
Biography
Drama
Historical
Period
Romance
Release Date
1993
Production Company
Brent Brewington
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Tucson, Arizona, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 8m

Articles

Tombstone


The legendary American lawman Wyatt Earp (1848-1929) spent the twilight of his life in Hollywood as a consultant to those filmmakers and actors involved in the nascent years of the Western film. As a seeming function of this, the entertainment industry fanned a fascination with his legend and exploits that would span generations. From My Darling Clementine (1946) to Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957) to Hour of the Gun (1967), the studios have never tired of revisiting the Earp brothers' defining 1881 confrontation with the Clanton gang; two separate major studio productions were mounted in the early '90s. The first to arrive, Tombstone (1993), benefited from an impressive array of performers in the major and minor roles and an earnest attempt to give the principals dimension.

The story opens in the titular silver-rich Arizona boom town of 1979 with the arrival of Earp (Kurt Russell) and his brothers Morgan (Bill Paxton) and Virgil (Sam Elliott), all weary of the demands of keeping the civil peace and ready to try their luck at private enterprise. Wyatt isn't in town long before he muscles his way into the faro concession at one of the local watering holes, or before the siblings renew acquaintances with their old friend, the cultivated dentist-turned-gunfighter Doc Holliday (Val Kilmer), and his ladyfriend Kate (Joanna Pacula).

While the Earps' repute gives them a wide berth from the town authorities, it also gains the attention of the ruthless gang of toughs declaring themselves the "Cowboys," who've essentially terrorized the locals with impunity. These red-scarf-adorned proto-gangstas include among their number the vicious Curly Bill Brosius (Powers Boothe), the literate if lethal Johnny Ringo (Michael Biehn), and the cutthroat Clanton brothers, Ike (Stephen Lang) and Billy (Thomas Haden Church). While the Earps are initially determined that law and order should be someone else's headache, they're pushed to the limit by the Cowboys until their celebrated showdown, and the less-celebrated blood vendetta that followed in its wake.

It's all told with fairly painstaking period detail--the cast sweated through wool costuming in the location heat--and by a fairly remarkable roster of players. Besides the aforementioned, significant attention was given to Dana Wheeler-Nicholson as Wyatt's laudanum-addicted second wife Mattie, and Dana Delaney as Josephine Marcus, the free-spirited Jewish actress who would become his companion for the rest of his days. Prominent roles were ably executed by Terry O'Quinn, Billy Bob Thornton, Michael Rooker, Jason Priestley, Billy Zane and Robert Burke, and genre stalwarts like Charlton Heston, Harry Carey, Jr., Pedro Armendariz, Jr., Buck Taylor and Tomas Arana offering their familiar presence. Playing Billy Claiborne was Wyatt Earp, the lawman's namesake fifth cousin.

Tombstone's production was a rocky road. The project was intended as the directing debut for its scripter Kevin Jarre, whose most noted credit at that time was the screenplay for Glory (1989). Jarre, however, was dismissed one month into the shoot and replaced by the journeyman George P. Cosmatos (Rambo: First Blood Part II [1985]). Russell would state in a 2006 interview with True West magazine that he took the reins for most of the production, with Cosmatos serving in a supervisory capacity. Robert Mitchum, whose voice-overs at the film's opening and close served to hide some of the continuity problems from the on-the-fly changes, had originally signed to appear on-screen as Old Man Clanton. However, the venerable star threw his back out while riding during the first day of filming, and Jarre wrote out the role.

Much as Dennis Quaid would do the following year in the Lawrence Kasdan-Kevin Costner production of Wyatt Earp (1994), Kilmer nearly walked away with the picture with his flavorful take on the tubercular gunslinger Holliday. "He was actually a dentist, so he had a mean streak even before he started killing people," Kilmer stated in a 1994 interview with Britain's Film Review. "But he was also an aristocrat, the son of a Georgia mayor--apparently a very witty man, extremely shy unless you insulted him. He knew Latin, and he played classical piano. He's never been portrayed as three-dimensional before. Kevin Jarre did a great job."

Producer: Sean Daniel, John Fasano, Buzz Feitshans, William A. Fraker, James Jacks, Bob Misiorowski, Michael R. Sloan, Andrew G. Vajna
Director: George P. Cosmatos
Screenplay: Kevin Jarre
Cinematography: William A. Fraker
Film Editing: Harvey Rosenstock, Roberto Silvi, Frank J. Urioste
Art Direction: Chris Gorak, Kim Hix, Mark Worthington
Music: Bruce Broughton
Cast: Kurt Russell (Wyatt Earp), Val Kilmer (Doc Holliday), Sam Elliott (Virgil Earp), Bill Paxton (Morgan Earp), Powers Boothe (Curly Bill Brocious), Michael Biehn (Johnny Ringo).
C-130m. Letterboxed.

by Jay S. Steinberg
Tombstone

Tombstone

The legendary American lawman Wyatt Earp (1848-1929) spent the twilight of his life in Hollywood as a consultant to those filmmakers and actors involved in the nascent years of the Western film. As a seeming function of this, the entertainment industry fanned a fascination with his legend and exploits that would span generations. From My Darling Clementine (1946) to Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957) to Hour of the Gun (1967), the studios have never tired of revisiting the Earp brothers' defining 1881 confrontation with the Clanton gang; two separate major studio productions were mounted in the early '90s. The first to arrive, Tombstone (1993), benefited from an impressive array of performers in the major and minor roles and an earnest attempt to give the principals dimension. The story opens in the titular silver-rich Arizona boom town of 1979 with the arrival of Earp (Kurt Russell) and his brothers Morgan (Bill Paxton) and Virgil (Sam Elliott), all weary of the demands of keeping the civil peace and ready to try their luck at private enterprise. Wyatt isn't in town long before he muscles his way into the faro concession at one of the local watering holes, or before the siblings renew acquaintances with their old friend, the cultivated dentist-turned-gunfighter Doc Holliday (Val Kilmer), and his ladyfriend Kate (Joanna Pacula). While the Earps' repute gives them a wide berth from the town authorities, it also gains the attention of the ruthless gang of toughs declaring themselves the "Cowboys," who've essentially terrorized the locals with impunity. These red-scarf-adorned proto-gangstas include among their number the vicious Curly Bill Brosius (Powers Boothe), the literate if lethal Johnny Ringo (Michael Biehn), and the cutthroat Clanton brothers, Ike (Stephen Lang) and Billy (Thomas Haden Church). While the Earps are initially determined that law and order should be someone else's headache, they're pushed to the limit by the Cowboys until their celebrated showdown, and the less-celebrated blood vendetta that followed in its wake. It's all told with fairly painstaking period detail--the cast sweated through wool costuming in the location heat--and by a fairly remarkable roster of players. Besides the aforementioned, significant attention was given to Dana Wheeler-Nicholson as Wyatt's laudanum-addicted second wife Mattie, and Dana Delaney as Josephine Marcus, the free-spirited Jewish actress who would become his companion for the rest of his days. Prominent roles were ably executed by Terry O'Quinn, Billy Bob Thornton, Michael Rooker, Jason Priestley, Billy Zane and Robert Burke, and genre stalwarts like Charlton Heston, Harry Carey, Jr., Pedro Armendariz, Jr., Buck Taylor and Tomas Arana offering their familiar presence. Playing Billy Claiborne was Wyatt Earp, the lawman's namesake fifth cousin. Tombstone's production was a rocky road. The project was intended as the directing debut for its scripter Kevin Jarre, whose most noted credit at that time was the screenplay for Glory (1989). Jarre, however, was dismissed one month into the shoot and replaced by the journeyman George P. Cosmatos (Rambo: First Blood Part II [1985]). Russell would state in a 2006 interview with True West magazine that he took the reins for most of the production, with Cosmatos serving in a supervisory capacity. Robert Mitchum, whose voice-overs at the film's opening and close served to hide some of the continuity problems from the on-the-fly changes, had originally signed to appear on-screen as Old Man Clanton. However, the venerable star threw his back out while riding during the first day of filming, and Jarre wrote out the role. Much as Dennis Quaid would do the following year in the Lawrence Kasdan-Kevin Costner production of Wyatt Earp (1994), Kilmer nearly walked away with the picture with his flavorful take on the tubercular gunslinger Holliday. "He was actually a dentist, so he had a mean streak even before he started killing people," Kilmer stated in a 1994 interview with Britain's Film Review. "But he was also an aristocrat, the son of a Georgia mayor--apparently a very witty man, extremely shy unless you insulted him. He knew Latin, and he played classical piano. He's never been portrayed as three-dimensional before. Kevin Jarre did a great job." Producer: Sean Daniel, John Fasano, Buzz Feitshans, William A. Fraker, James Jacks, Bob Misiorowski, Michael R. Sloan, Andrew G. Vajna Director: George P. Cosmatos Screenplay: Kevin Jarre Cinematography: William A. Fraker Film Editing: Harvey Rosenstock, Roberto Silvi, Frank J. Urioste Art Direction: Chris Gorak, Kim Hix, Mark Worthington Music: Bruce Broughton Cast: Kurt Russell (Wyatt Earp), Val Kilmer (Doc Holliday), Sam Elliott (Virgil Earp), Bill Paxton (Morgan Earp), Powers Boothe (Curly Bill Brocious), Michael Biehn (Johnny Ringo). C-130m. Letterboxed. by Jay S. Steinberg

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Wide Release in United States December 25, 1993

Expanded Release in United States December 31, 1993

Released in United States on Video June 22, 1994

Released in United States Winter December 25, 1993

Wide Release in United States December 25, 1993

Expanded Release in United States December 31, 1993

Released in United States on Video June 22, 1994

Kevin Jarre was replaced as director by George P. Cosmatos Mid June 1993.

Universal Pictures put the project into turnaround, February 1993.

Completed shooting August 28, 1993.

Began shooting May 17, 1993.

Actor Kevin Costner was reportedly approached to appear in this film. Instead, Costner will be starring in Lawrence Kasdan's upcoming Wyatt Earp project for Warner Bros.

Released in United States Winter December 25, 1993