Maverick


2h 9m 1994

Brief Synopsis

A Western gambler tries to raise the entry fee for a high-stakes poker game.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Action
Adventure
Western
Period
Adaptation
Release Date
1994
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Portland, Oregon, USA; Lone Pine, California, USA; El Mirage, California, USA; Northern Arizona, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 9m

Synopsis

James Garner garnered fame playing Bret Maverick on TV, and now he's back as an easy-going lawman with Mel Gibson taking on the Maverick role. Maverick has the chance to win big in a riverboat poker tournament, but he needs to come up with the entrance money first. This rollicking comedy also stars Jodie Foster and was nominated for an Oscar for Best Costume Design.

Crew

Alia Agha

Effects Coordinator

Dick Alexander

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

John Anderson

Song Performer

Randy Archer

Song Performer

Bub Asman

Sound Editor

Stuart Baird

Editor

Michael Beche

Location Manager

Clint Black

Song

Clint Black

Song Performer

Suzy Bogguss

Song Performer

Larry Boone

Song

Jim Brockett

Animal Trainer

Christopher S Brooks

Music Editor

Christopher Brown

Assistant

Tony Brown

Production Manager

Timothy A Burris

Accounting Assistant

William Carruth

Adr Editor

Gary Chapman

Song Performer

Michael Chavez

Assistant Camera Operator

Christine Cholvin

Music

Jerry Cipperly

Transportation Captain

Earl Clark

Song

Rob Coleman

Cgi Artist

Alexander B Collett

Associate Producer

D'ann Connelly

Location Manager

John J Connor

Director Of Photography

Matt Connors

Stunts

Walt Conti

Digital Effects Supervisor

Virginia Cook

Sound Editor

Andrew Cooper

Photography

Glenn Richard Cote

Assistant

Nathan Crowley

Assistant Art Director

Samuel C Crutcher

Sound Editor

Bruce Davey

Producer

Don Davis

Original Music

Ray De La Motte

Camera Operator

Billy Dean

Song Performer

Lisa Dean

Set Decorator

Richard Deats

Key Grip

Luis Delgado

Assistant

Greg Dillion

Sound Editor

Shane Dixon

Stunts

Richard Donner

Producer

Steve Dorff

Music Supervisor

Daniel T. Dorrance

Art Director

Marion Dougherty

Casting

Richard Miller Ellis

Stunts

Geno Escarrega

Post-Production Supervisor

April Ferry

Costume Designer

Chris Silver Finigan

Production Accountant

Larry Fitzgerald

Music Supervisor

Jim Flamberg

Music Producer

Patti Ford

Assistant

Alexandria Forster

Costumes

Radney Foster

Song Performer

Les Fresholtz

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Richard Friedman

Adr Editor

David Gabrielli

Foreman

James Garner

Song Performer

Antonio Garrido

Dolly Grip

Mel Gibson

Song Performer

Norman Glasser

Lighting Technician

Martin Glover

Assistant Camera Operator

William Goldman

Screenplay

J. Mills Goodloe

Assistant

Amy Grant

Song Performer

Lisa Greenspan

Assistant

Noel Haggard

Song Performer

Michael Hancock

Makeup Supervisor

Jennifer Hare

Assistant

Tom Harper

Stunts

Mark Hartley

Music Supervisor

Jack Hayes

Original Music

Robert G Henderson

Sound Editor

Linda Hendrikson

Costume Supervisor

Faith Hill

Song Performer

David L Horton

Foley Editor

David Horton

Sound Editor

James Newton Howard

Song

Hayley H Hsu

Assistant Director

Roy Huggins

Other

Charles Ireland

Assistant Editor

Eric R Jacobson

Production Secretary

Jerry Jacobson

Sound Editor

Waylon Jennings

Song Performer

Waylon Jennings

Song

Charlene Johnson

Hair Stylist

Michael Kelly

Editor

Hal Ketchum

Song Performer

Bill King

Boom Operator

Clark King

Sound Mixer

Jim Klinger

Sound Editor

Shauna L Kroen

Production Accountant

Bruce Kuroyama

Special Effects

Cece Neber Labao

Assistant

Delfin Labao

Assistant

Patricia Lamagna

Assistant

Shawn Landis

Assistant

Mary Laplante

Assistant

Tracy Lawrence

Song

Tracy Lawrence

Song Performer

Helena Lea

Music

Chris Lee

Hair Stylist

Jim Lemley

Unit Production Manager

Larry Lennert

Other

Terry Leonard

Unit Director

Amy London

Assistant

Dean Lopata

Assistant

Paul H Lopez

Costume Supervisor

Uriah S Lovelycolors

Assistant

Abbie Ludwig

Assistant

Steve Luport

Special Effects

Pat Marshall

Lighting

Darrin Martin

Sound Editor

Bill Mather

Visual Effects

Kathy Mattea

Song Performer

Michael Matteson

Best Boy

Jonas C. Matz

Other

Reba Mcentire

Song Performer

Roni Mckinley

Visual Effects

Jayson Merrill

Assistant

Billy Meshover

Assistant Editor

Robert M Misetich

Other

John Michael Montgomery

Song Performer

Michael S Moore

Assistant Editor

Ted Moser

Transportation Captain

Jud Nealon

Assistant Editor

Erik L Nelson

Property Master

Paul Nelson

Song

David P Newell

Assistant Property Master

Liz Newman

Other

Randy Newman

Song

Randy Newman

Song Performer

Randy Newman

Music

Hayden Nicholas

Song

Kenneth Nishino

Assistant Camera Operator

Neal Norton

Camera Operator

John O'connor

Camera

Princess O'mahoney

Assistant Director

Michael Omartian

Song

Michael Omartian

Song Performer

Marque Owen

Other

Johnny Park

Song Performer

George Patterson

Assistant

Lisa Peters

Sound Editor

Steve Price

Visual Effects Supervisor

Dallas Puett

Editing

Eddie Rabbitt

Song Performer

Maryann Rea

Assistant

Mic Rodgers

Stunt Coordinator

Danny Rogers

Stunts

Marvin Salsberg

Construction Coordinator

Thomas E. Sanders

Production Designer

John G. Scotti

Assistant Director

Dennis Seawright

Assistant Camera Operator

Danny Shirley

Song Performer

Elaine Short

Hair Stylist

James Simcik

Adr Editor

Bob Simokovic

Special Effects

Mary Ann Skweres

Assistant Editor

Dean Smith

Stunts

Neil Smith

Special Effects

Alisa Statman

Assistant Director

Larry Stewart

Song Performer

Kevin Stitt

Assistant Editor

Bob Stoker

Special Effects

Jill Stokesberry

Stunts

Allen L Stone

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

James Stroud

Song

Lucinda Strub

Special Effects

Matt Sweeney

Special Effects Coordinator

Wayne Tidwell

Video Assist/Playback

Scot Tinsley

Foley Editor

Cynnie Troup

Script Supervisor

Yusei Uesugi

Visual Effects

Rudy Ugland

Animal Wrangler

Robert Ulrich

Adr Editor

Ricky Van Shelton

Song Performer

Jim Van Wyck

Assistant Director

Jim Van Wyck

Coproducer

Kristan Wagner

Location Manager

Brooke Ward

Sound Editor

Don Was

Song

Joy White

Song Performer

Marshall Winn

Sound Editor

Frank Wolf

Sound Mixer

John M Woodward

Transportation Coordinator

John Wright

Craft Service

Tammy Wynette

Song Performer

William Zsigmond

Director Of Photography

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Action
Adventure
Western
Period
Adaptation
Release Date
1994
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Portland, Oregon, USA; Lone Pine, California, USA; El Mirage, California, USA; Northern Arizona, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 9m

Award Nominations

Best Costume Design

1994
April Ferry

Articles

Maverick (1994)


Based on the popular television series starring James Garner that ran from 1957-1962, Mel Gibson plays the title character in Maverick (1994), a charming gambler trying to round up the $25,000 entrance fee for a high stakes winner-take-all poker tournament. Twists and turns abound, however, as he encounters a band of colorful characters along the way including bad guy Angel (Alfred Molina), sexy con artist Annabelle (Jodie Foster) and Marshal Zane Cooper, played by original TV Maverick James Garner.

Mel Gibson first got the idea to do a big screen version of Maverick when he was shooting Franco Zeffirelli's Hamlet (1990). Westerns, a genre that had been long dormant at the time, were enjoying a comeback following the huge success of Clint Eastwood's Academy Award-winning Unforgiven in 1992. Gibson had been a fan of the TV series as a young boy and thought Maverick would make a terrific project for his production company, Icon Entertainment. Due to their previous success collaborating with Gibson on the hit Lethal Weapon series, Warner Bros. didn't need much convincing to give Maverick the green light.

With Warner Bros. on board, Gibson and his business partner Bruce Davey obtained the rights to Maverick and approached legendary screenwriter William Goldman (Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid [1969], The Princess Bride [1987]), to write the screenplay. "I said yes for four small reasons and one big one," recalls Goldman in his 2000 memoir Which Lie Did I Tell? More Adventures in the Screen Trade. "Here are the four: (1) I loved the old TV show with James Garner; (2) I felt the material was in my wheelhouse; (3) I had never met Gibson but after five minutes I knew he could play the hell out of the part; (4) I had not written a western in twenty-some years, was glad for the opportunity to try again. And the one big reason? Shamefacedly, here it is: I knew it would be easy."

Goldman's last several projects had all been original screenplays, and he was certain that an adaptation would be a comparative breeze. "All I needed to do was pick one of the old TV shows that had too much plot, expand it, and there would be the movie," he recalls himself thinking. Much to his chagrin, however, he could find no material for a film despite immersing himself in several hours worth of old Maverick episodes. "I essentially had to write, sob, another original," he says. "It was not going to be easy money at the brick factory again."

Mel Gibson also brought director Richard Donner (The Omen [1976], Superman [1978]) on board for the Maverick film. Donner was the perfect choice for the material, having already directed Gibson in the similarly toned Lethal Weapon (1987) and its sequels.

The flirty feminine role of Annabelle marked a departure for Academy Award winning actress Jodie Foster, who was known more for her portrayal of tough, edgy women characters. "It was so unlike anything I had ever done and that's probably the reason why I was attracted to it," said Foster in a 1994 interview. "I was really interested in doing a comedy that was light-hearted and witty." Foster's performance is the biggest surprise of the movie and a fun treat from the usually serious actress.

Maverick boasts some impressive location scenery from El Mirage and Lone Pine, California; Lake Powell, Arizona; and Oregon, shot by Academy Award-winning cinematographer Vilmos Zsigmond. To add authenticity to his scenes as a gun slinging card sharp, Mel Gibson worked with gun specialist Phil Spangenberger, who taught him some fancy gun tricks. He also worked for hours learning to expertly handle a deck of cards, which he often found to be more difficult than handling a gun.

The cast and crew all thoroughly enjoyed themselves while making Maverick, and that sense of fun came through on every frame as the film went on to become a box office hit during the summer of 1994. "Now comes Maverick," said Roger Ebert in his Chicago Sun-Times review, "the first lighthearted, laugh-oriented family Western in a long time, and one of the nice things about it is, it doesn't feel the need to justify its existence." Variety said, "[Richard] Donner conducts with aplomb the high-wire act of balancing vintage Western set pieces with contemporary high jinks. Maverick is an authentic oater that eschews shortcuts. You can almost taste the dust rising up from the pristine period re-creations vividly captured on the big screen by Vilmos Zsigmond." The New York Times said, "Fast, funny, full of straight-ahead action and tongue-in-cheek jokes, Maverick is Lethal Weapon meets Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. That combination won't win any prizes for originality, but it works like a movie mogul's dream and sets the summer-film season off to an unbeatable start."

One of the best things about Maverick is that you don't have to be familiar with the television series in order to enjoy the movie. Also, viewers will enjoy trying to spot the many country music stars who make cameo appearances throughout the film including the late Waylon Jennings, Clint Black, Vince Gill, Hal Ketchum, and Kathy Mattea as well as a "wink wink" glimpse of Gibson's Lethal Weapon co-star Danny Glover.

April Ferry's lush and colorful costumes received an Academy Award nomination.

Producers: Bruce Davey and Richard Donner
Director: Richard Donner
Screenplay: William Goldman, Roy Huggins (TV series "Maverick")
Cinematography: Vilmos Zsigmond
Art Direction: Daniel Dorrance
Music: Randy Newman
Film Editing: Stuart Baird and Mike Kelly
Cast: Mel Gibson (Bret Maverick), Jodie Foster (Annabelle Bransford), James Garner (Marshal Zane Cooper), Graham Greene (Joseph), Alfred Molina (Angel), James Coburn (Commodore Duvall).
C-127m. Letterboxed. Closed Captioning.

by Andrea Passafiume
Maverick (1994)

Maverick (1994)

Based on the popular television series starring James Garner that ran from 1957-1962, Mel Gibson plays the title character in Maverick (1994), a charming gambler trying to round up the $25,000 entrance fee for a high stakes winner-take-all poker tournament. Twists and turns abound, however, as he encounters a band of colorful characters along the way including bad guy Angel (Alfred Molina), sexy con artist Annabelle (Jodie Foster) and Marshal Zane Cooper, played by original TV Maverick James Garner. Mel Gibson first got the idea to do a big screen version of Maverick when he was shooting Franco Zeffirelli's Hamlet (1990). Westerns, a genre that had been long dormant at the time, were enjoying a comeback following the huge success of Clint Eastwood's Academy Award-winning Unforgiven in 1992. Gibson had been a fan of the TV series as a young boy and thought Maverick would make a terrific project for his production company, Icon Entertainment. Due to their previous success collaborating with Gibson on the hit Lethal Weapon series, Warner Bros. didn't need much convincing to give Maverick the green light. With Warner Bros. on board, Gibson and his business partner Bruce Davey obtained the rights to Maverick and approached legendary screenwriter William Goldman (Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid [1969], The Princess Bride [1987]), to write the screenplay. "I said yes for four small reasons and one big one," recalls Goldman in his 2000 memoir Which Lie Did I Tell? More Adventures in the Screen Trade. "Here are the four: (1) I loved the old TV show with James Garner; (2) I felt the material was in my wheelhouse; (3) I had never met Gibson but after five minutes I knew he could play the hell out of the part; (4) I had not written a western in twenty-some years, was glad for the opportunity to try again. And the one big reason? Shamefacedly, here it is: I knew it would be easy." Goldman's last several projects had all been original screenplays, and he was certain that an adaptation would be a comparative breeze. "All I needed to do was pick one of the old TV shows that had too much plot, expand it, and there would be the movie," he recalls himself thinking. Much to his chagrin, however, he could find no material for a film despite immersing himself in several hours worth of old Maverick episodes. "I essentially had to write, sob, another original," he says. "It was not going to be easy money at the brick factory again." Mel Gibson also brought director Richard Donner (The Omen [1976], Superman [1978]) on board for the Maverick film. Donner was the perfect choice for the material, having already directed Gibson in the similarly toned Lethal Weapon (1987) and its sequels. The flirty feminine role of Annabelle marked a departure for Academy Award winning actress Jodie Foster, who was known more for her portrayal of tough, edgy women characters. "It was so unlike anything I had ever done and that's probably the reason why I was attracted to it," said Foster in a 1994 interview. "I was really interested in doing a comedy that was light-hearted and witty." Foster's performance is the biggest surprise of the movie and a fun treat from the usually serious actress. Maverick boasts some impressive location scenery from El Mirage and Lone Pine, California; Lake Powell, Arizona; and Oregon, shot by Academy Award-winning cinematographer Vilmos Zsigmond. To add authenticity to his scenes as a gun slinging card sharp, Mel Gibson worked with gun specialist Phil Spangenberger, who taught him some fancy gun tricks. He also worked for hours learning to expertly handle a deck of cards, which he often found to be more difficult than handling a gun. The cast and crew all thoroughly enjoyed themselves while making Maverick, and that sense of fun came through on every frame as the film went on to become a box office hit during the summer of 1994. "Now comes Maverick," said Roger Ebert in his Chicago Sun-Times review, "the first lighthearted, laugh-oriented family Western in a long time, and one of the nice things about it is, it doesn't feel the need to justify its existence." Variety said, "[Richard] Donner conducts with aplomb the high-wire act of balancing vintage Western set pieces with contemporary high jinks. Maverick is an authentic oater that eschews shortcuts. You can almost taste the dust rising up from the pristine period re-creations vividly captured on the big screen by Vilmos Zsigmond." The New York Times said, "Fast, funny, full of straight-ahead action and tongue-in-cheek jokes, Maverick is Lethal Weapon meets Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. That combination won't win any prizes for originality, but it works like a movie mogul's dream and sets the summer-film season off to an unbeatable start." One of the best things about Maverick is that you don't have to be familiar with the television series in order to enjoy the movie. Also, viewers will enjoy trying to spot the many country music stars who make cameo appearances throughout the film including the late Waylon Jennings, Clint Black, Vince Gill, Hal Ketchum, and Kathy Mattea as well as a "wink wink" glimpse of Gibson's Lethal Weapon co-star Danny Glover. April Ferry's lush and colorful costumes received an Academy Award nomination. Producers: Bruce Davey and Richard Donner Director: Richard Donner Screenplay: William Goldman, Roy Huggins (TV series "Maverick") Cinematography: Vilmos Zsigmond Art Direction: Daniel Dorrance Music: Randy Newman Film Editing: Stuart Baird and Mike Kelly Cast: Mel Gibson (Bret Maverick), Jodie Foster (Annabelle Bransford), James Garner (Marshal Zane Cooper), Graham Greene (Joseph), Alfred Molina (Angel), James Coburn (Commodore Duvall). C-127m. Letterboxed. Closed Captioning. by Andrea Passafiume

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video December 17, 1994

Released in United States Spring May 20, 1994

Began shooting August 16, 1993.

Completed shooting December 10, 1993.

ICON Productions is actor Mel Gibson's production company.

Released in United States Spring May 20, 1994

Released in United States on Video December 17, 1994