Terence Fisher


Director
Terence Fisher

About

Also Known As
T R Fisher
Birth Place
London, England, GB
Born
February 23, 1904
Died
June 18, 1980
Cause of Death
Cancer

Biography

Leading British horror director of the 1950s and 60s who began his career as an editor and a director of romantic melodramas. Fisher joined Hammer Studios in 1952 and first hit his stride in 1957 with "Curse of Frankenstein." His subsequent output of low-budget B remakes of Univeral horror classics for Hammer including proficient chillers such as "Horror of Dracula" (1958) and "The Devil...

Biography

Leading British horror director of the 1950s and 60s who began his career as an editor and a director of romantic melodramas. Fisher joined Hammer Studios in 1952 and first hit his stride in 1957 with "Curse of Frankenstein." His subsequent output of low-budget B remakes of Univeral horror classics for Hammer including proficient chillers such as "Horror of Dracula" (1958) and "The Devil Rides Out" (1968) (alongside best-forgotten mishaps such as "Frankenstein Created Woman" 1967), is noted for its brash colors, liberal use of blood, and casting of has-been American former stars.

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

Frankenstein and the Monster From Hell (1974)
Director
Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed (1969)
Director
The Devil's Bride (1968)
Director
Island of Terror (1967)
Director
Frankenstein Created Woman (1967)
Director
Island of the Burning Damned (1967)
Director
Dracula--Prince of Darkness (1966)
Director
The Gorgon (1965)
Director
The Horror of It All (1964)
Director
The Earth Dies Screaming (1964)
Director
The Phantom of the Opera (1962)
Director
Sherlock Holmes und das Halsband des Todes (1962)
Director
Sword of Sherwood Forest (1961)
Director
The Two Faces of Dr. Jekyll (1961)
Director
The Curse of the Werewolf (1961)
Director
The Brides of Dracula (1960)
Director
The Stranglers of Bombay (1960)
Director
The Mummy (1959)
Director
The Hound of the Baskervilles (1959)
Director
The Man Who Could Cheat Death (1959)
Director
The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958)
Director
Horror of Dracula (1958)
Director
Kill Me Tomorrow (1957)
Director
The Curse of Frankenstein (1957)
Director
The Last Man to Hang (1956)
Director
The Gelignite Gang (1956)
Director
Stolen Assignment (1955)
Director
The Flaw (1955)
Director
The Black Glove (1954)
Director
Blackout (1954)
Director
The Unholy Four (1954)
Director
Race for Life (1954)
Director
Children Galore (1954)
Director
Final Appointment (1954)
Director
Spaceways (1953)
Director
Man in Hiding (1953)
Director
Four Sided Triangle (1953)
Director
Blood Orange (1953)
Director
Three Stops to Murder (1953)
Director
Stolen Face (1952)
Director
Wings of Danger (1952)
Director
Man Bait (1952)
Director
Distant Trumpet (1952)
Director
Home to Danger (1951)
Director
So Long at the Fair (1950)
Director
The Astonished Heart (1949)
Director
Marry Me (1949)
Director
To the Public Danger (1948)
Director
Portait From Life (1948)
Director
Song of Tomorrow (1948)
Director
Colonel Bogey (1948)
Director

Writer (Feature Film)

Four Sided Triangle (1953)
Screenwriter
Man in Hiding (1953)
Screenwriter

Editing (Feature Film)

Eureka Stockade (1984)
Editor Supervisor
The Wicked Lady (1945)
Editor
The Dark Tower (1943)
Editor
Sons of the Sea (1942)
Editing
Flying Fortress (1942)
Editing
The Peterville Diamond (1942)
Editor
The Seventh Survivor (1941)
Editor
George and Margaret (1940)
Editor
Mr. Satan (1938)
Editor
Windbag the Sailor (1936)
Editor
Falling For You (1933)
Editor

Film Production - Main (Feature Film)

Hundred Pound Window (1944)
Production Supervisor

Life Events

1929

Joined Merchant Marine Service; attained rank of junior officer with P. & O. Fleet

1930

Became window-dressor for a London department store

1930

Entered film industry at Shepherd's Bush Studios as clapper boy and runner

1933

Initial screen credit, as clapper boy on "Falling for You"

1935

First film as assistant editor, "Brown on Resolution/Born For Glory"

1936

Debut as a solo editor, "The Two of Us"

1947

Feature directorial debut, "Colonel Bogey"

1952

Joined Hammer Studios

1952

Directed episodes of "Robin Hood" TV series

Videos

Movie Clip

Gorgon, The (1964) - They're Bringing The Body In Now After the murder of an artists’ model in some Carpathian forest, we meet Peter Cushing as the local scientist-doctor, Barbara Shelley his assistant, Patrick Troughton the policeman, and Jack Watson as Ratoff, then the weird discovery, early in Hammer Films’ The Gorgon, 1964.
Gorgon, The (1964) - We Are Men Of Science Increasingly emotional assistant Carla (Barbara Shelley) can’t see why doctor Namaroff (Peter Cushing) won’t discuss the spooky Greek-myth angle (i.e. corpses turned to stone) on the local murders, then a victim’s father (Michael Goodliffe), a former colleague, presses a similar point, in Hammer Films’ The Gorgon, 1964.
Gorgon, The (1964) - It's Not A Pretty Sight His hair turned gray after his encounter with the title monster (whose dead victims turn to stone), Heitz (Richard Pasco) receives his mentor and family friend Meister (Christopher Lee) from Leipzig, while Namaroff (Peter Cushing) slices up an ex-patient, with his still-more remote assistant Carla (Barbara Shelley), in Hammer Films’ The Gorgon, 1964.
Devil's Bride, The (1968) - They're Just For Decoration Old family friends De Richleau (Christopher Lee) and Van Ryn (Leon Greene) surmise that they've crashed a secret satanic ritual and Simon (Patrick Mower) needs rescuing, early in Hammer Films' The Devil's Bride, 1968.
Devil's Bride, The (1968) - Don't Look At The Eyes! Apparently too late to interrupt a big satanic ritual at the new home of their wayward wealthy protegé, “Duc” Richleau (Christopher Lee) and friend Rex (Leon Greene) instead discover convincing evidence of evil, in Hammer Films’ The Devil’s Bride (a.k.a. The Devil Rides Out), 1968.
Devil's Bride, The (1968) - The Goat Of Mendes Christopher Lee (as "De Richleau") and colleague Van Ryn (Leon Greene), stay composed when they recognize the guest, as Mocata (Charles Gray) leads satanic rites, Simon and Tanith (Patrick Mower, Nike Arrighi) the subjects, in Hammer Films' The Devil's Bride, 1968.
Frankenstein Created Woman (1967) - Twist That Anti-Clockwise Not altogether essential to the story but allowing for some philosophical commentary, Dr. Frankenstein (Peter Cushing) here has enlisted assistant Hertz (Thorley Walters) to enable the power source for the experiment referred-to in the title, cueing some excellent Hammer Films’ tech, in Frankenstein Created Woman, 1967.
Frankenstein Created Woman (1967) - Healthy Young Girl Formerly dead, brunette, disfigured and disabled, Christina (Susan Denberg) is switched on by Frankenstein (Peter Cushing) and aide Hertz (Thorley Walters), and she has questions, in Hammer Films' Frankenstein Created Woman, 1967.
Frankenstein Created Woman (1967) - He Lives! Assistants Hans (Robert Morris) and Dr. Hartz (Thorley Walters) un-freeze Frankenstein (Peter Cushing) who explains he's getting into soul transplants, early in Hammer Films' Frankenstein Created Woman, 1967.
Dracula, Prince Of Darkness (1966) - Luxury Of A Warm Posterior Some foreboding, as bothered Abbot Shandor (Andrew Keir) comes upon English tourists (Barbara Shelley, Francis Matthews, Charles Tingwell, Suzan Farmer) in a Carpathian pub, early in Hammer Films' Dracula, Prince Of Darkness, 1966.
Dracula, Prince Of Darkness (1966) - The Obscene Cult Ominous narration from Hammer Films, recapping the previous vampire film Horror Of Dracula, in which Peter Cushing (as Van Helsing) kills off Dracula (Christopher Lee), opening Dracula, Prince Of Darkness, 1966.
Dracula, Prince Of Darkness - Your Husband... Servant Klove (Philip Latham) sprinkles his master's ashes with the blood of a house-guest, fetches his wife Helen (Barbara Shelley) at which point the star (Christopher Lee) finally appears, in Hammer Films' Dracula, Prince Of Darkness, 1966.

Trailer

Bibliography