Jane Russell


Actor
Jane Russell

About

Also Known As
Ernestine Jane Geraldine Russell
Birth Place
Bemidji, Minnesota, USA
Born
June 21, 1921
Died
February 28, 2011

Biography

Made virtually synonymous with voluptuousness by Hollywood publicists and press in the 1940s and 1950s, Jane Russell's talents as a dramatic actress and musical performer were given significantly less attention than her statuesque figure. She was brought to fame by Howard Hughes, who made a fetish of her image in the controversial B-Western "The Outlaw" (1943). Russell smoldered quite sp...

Photos & Videos

The Outlaw - Jane Russell Publicity Stills
The French Line - Lobby Card Set
Underwater! - Scene Stills

Family & Companions

Bob Waterfield
Husband
Football player, coach. Played quarterback professionally for the Cleveland Rams, later became coach of the Los Angeles Rams; highschool sweethearts; married on April 24, 1943; Russell filed for divorce February 2, 1967 and received final decree in July 1968; Russell received custody of two older children and Waterfield received the youngest child; died in 1983.
Roger Barrett
Husband
Actor. Born c. 1921; met while doing stock work together in Niles, Michigan; married on August 25, 1968; died of a heart attack on November 17, 1968.
John Calvin Peoples
Husband
Business executive. Born c. 1925; married from January 31, 1974 until his death in 1999.

Bibliography

"My Path and Detours"
Jane Russell (1985)

Notes

James Robert Parish has characterized certain aspects of Russell's star persona, performance style and personality as follows: "tough babe with a heart of gold, a liberated female who still craves to be dominated by a right guy, a former small-town innocent who has drifted into the morally ambiguous world of show business and now has the scars to prove her apprenticeship. What distinguished Jane's screen presence was her marvelously unpretentious attitude. She is totally un-self-conscious about her too-well-proportioned torso, equally unimpressed by her thrush abilities (modest as they are), and plainly aware that she may not be the most intellectual broad around town, and she is totally well intentioned." (Quoted from "The RKO Gals", Arlington House, 1974)

Evidence of Howard Hughes's bosom fixation may be found in such remarks about Russell as "There are two reasons why men will pay to see her." Hughes was not alone, however, in making sarcastic remarks about Russell's cleavage. Bob Hope, for instance, once introduced her as "the two and only Jane Russell".

Biography

Made virtually synonymous with voluptuousness by Hollywood publicists and press in the 1940s and 1950s, Jane Russell's talents as a dramatic actress and musical performer were given significantly less attention than her statuesque figure. She was brought to fame by Howard Hughes, who made a fetish of her image in the controversial B-Western "The Outlaw" (1943). Russell smoldered quite spectacularly on screen, but showed a particular knack for both a wisecrack and a song, as demonstrated in "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" (1953) and other musicals. She was teamed to great effect on several occasions with Bob Hope in such films as "The Paleface" (1948) and with Robert Mitchum in "His Kind of Woman" (1951), both of which gave her ample opportunity to poke fun at her sexualized screen persona. She left Hollywood in the mid-1960s for sporadic work on stage and in commercials; the latter gave her a third-act boost of fame as the spokesperson for Playtex's bras for "full-figured gals." One of the last of the true Hollywood bombshells - blonde or otherwise - Russell's highly-sexualized screen persona overshadowed a consummate professional, under-appreciated for her talents and commitment to her craft.

Born Ernestine Jane Geraldine Russell in Bemidji, MN, she was the sole sister amidst a brood of four boys born to Roy Russell and Geraldine Jacobi on June 21, 1921. The family moved several times during her early years, first to Canada (home to Russell's grandparents), then to Minnesota and finally to southern California. Russell's mother was a former actress and approved of her daughter's interest in music and drama. According to her 1985 autobiography, Russell's childhood was also flecked with genuine drama - she survived two assaults and a botched abortion at 19, which resulted in her becoming unable to naturally conceive. After her father's early death at the age of 46, Russell went to work as a receptionist to help support her family. She also earned money as a model, with her mother continuing to encourage her artistic interests by urging her to study with famed acting coach Maria Ouspenskay. But in 1940, the young girl's life was about to change.

After seeing photographs of the buxom bombshell, Howard Hughes signed his latest discovery to a seven-year contract full of the usual binding terms that marked Hughes' legal dealings with new actresses. True to his obsessive nature, Hughes was fixated on the gravity-defying aspects of Russell's figure, and mapped out all manner of displaying it to the fullest degree in her feature debut, "The Outlaw," which gave a hot-blooded account of the romance between Billy the Kid and a wanton named Rio (Russell). According to Hollywood legend, early rushes of the film left Hughes displeased about the level of exposure given to Russell's breasts in the film, and he designed a special bra that would exploit them to absurd levels. In her autobiography, Russell stated that she found Hughes' uber-bra too constraining to wear, and simply wore her own undergarment during the filming of the picture.

Notorious in Hollywood circles for bedding his protégés, Hughes never succeeding in doing so with Russell, since she had married her high school sweetheart, future professional football player Bob Waterfield in 1943. He did put her on a grueling promotional routine that forced her to endure endless remarks about her breast size and proclivities. She shouldered the comments with impressive reserve and good humor; however, censorship issues and Hughes' own perfectionism forced "The Outlaw" to be pulled from theaters in 1943 to spend the next four years in reshoots and reedits. He also kept Russell off movie screens until the picture could be released. She only made one other film between 1941 and 1947 - a weepy romance called "The Young Widow" (1946) which she shot while briefly on loan to United Artists.

Despite the fact that her debut film had yet to play an extended date in theaters, Russell was exceptionally popular during the early 1940s as a WWII pinup. The extensive promotional campaign for "The Outlaw" had given her wide exposure, as did the famous image posed seductively against a haystack. By the time "The Outlaw" was finally released in its finished form, she was a star, though one known largely for her physique than her acting abilities. Hughes propagated that image with a series of lightweight dramas and musicals that presented her in a series of revealing or formfitting costumes. His obsession with her figure reached its most absurd apex with 1954's "The French Line," a harmless musical marked by scene after scene of leering angles at Russell's chest - made all the more unseemly by use of the 3-D process. The censors pounced upon the film prior to its general release, and Hughes eventually sent a much tamer version to theaters.

While Hughes was busy marketing Russell as prime cheesecake, the actress was quietly building a reputation as a capable actress and singer who could handle both drama and light comedy. She impressed audiences and critics alike in several team-ups with Bob Hope, starting in 1948 with "The Paleface," a loan-out to Paramount which cast her as Calamity Jane opposite Hope's traditional wisecracking coward. Their pairing was so successful that a sequel, "Son of Paleface" (1952) was ordered up, earning her an Oscar nomination for her rendition of "Am I In Love?" with Hope and Roy Rogers. Russell also worked well with Robert Mitchum in two noir dramas, "His Kind of Woman" (1951) and "Macao" (1952). Both actors projected enormous sex appeal in their scenes together, as well as the sense that both were approaching the overheated material with tongues planted firmly in cheeks.

Russell reached the apex of her movie career with the sparkling 1953 musical "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes." Paired with Marilyn Monroe - another actress whose abundant sexuality overshadowed her acting abilities - Russell was hailed by critics for her dry comic delivery and singing talents. A smash hit at the box office and on the record charts, it elevated her beyond the restraints of her pinup persona and showed her as a full-fledged and multifaceted actress. She shot her last film for Hughes - "Underwater," in 1955 - and soon after, began to take charge of her professional and personal life in bold strokes.

She and Waterfield launched their own production company, Russ-Field Productions, and oversaw three of her own pictures between 1955 and 1957. A well-liked singer who often performed with the Kay Kyser Orchestra in the 1940s, Russell also enjoyed a recording career and a touring nightclub act as a solo performer and in vocal trios, often with fellow actress Rhonda Fleming. After adopting two children with Waterfield, she campaigned heavily for the Federal Adoption Amendment of 1953 (which allowed children fathered by American servicemen overseas to be adopted by families in the United States) and later founded the World Adoption International Fund (WAIF) in 1956, which helped find homes for over 50,000 children. A political conservative and born-again Christian, she also launched the Hollywood Christian Group and sponsored a weekly Bible study in her home.

Unfortunately, Russell's film career never blossomed as it should have in the late 1950s. Her efforts during this period were likable, including a sequel to "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" called "Gentlemen Marry Brunettes" (1955), but fared only moderately well with audiences. Russell scaled back her movie roles and concentrated on stage and television; her final film appearances came in a string of low-budget Westerns in the late 1960s and in the violent detective drama "Darker Than Amber" (1970). The following year, she replaced Elaine Stritch on Broadway in the musical "Company."

She returned to the public eye in the 1970s as the spokesperson for the Playtex Cross Your Heart bra, which was made for abundantly endowed woman like herself. Though her acting appearances were only occasional at best - she appeared in several episodes of the primetime soap opera "The Yellow Rose" (NBC, 1983-1990) - she remained active with contributions to numerous documentaries about Hollywood's Golden Age, her favorite co-stars, and Howard Hughes. She also penned her autobiography, Jane Russell: My Paths and Detours, in 1985, which revealed the bouts of infidelity that brought her first marriage to an end, as well as struggles with alcohol.

In 1989, she received the Living Legacy Award from the Women's International Center for her tireless work for adoption groups. She launched a new nightclub act in 2006 with performers culled from the senior citizen ranks of Santa Maria, her hometown after the death of her third husband in 1999. The act, called "The Singing Forties," performed at the Radisson Hotel in Santa Maria and earned Russell high praise for her stage presence and vocal skills. In interviews, Russell stated that she had put together the act because of her frustration over adequate entertainment resources for older residents in Hollywood. Russell was portrayed by actress Erika Nann in the 1996 TV movie "Norma Jean and Marilyn," which depicted her placing her hand and footprints alongside Monroe in the sidewalk outside Graumann's Chinese Theatre in 1953. Actress Renee Henderson later played Russell in the Monroe miniseries "Blonde" in 2001. The actress died at age 89 on Feb. 28, 2011 at her home in Santa Maria, CA.

Filmography

 

Cast (Feature Film)

Robert Mitchum: The Reluctant Star (1991)
Darker Than Amber (1970)
Alabama Tiger
The Born Losers (1967)
Mrs. Shorn
Waco (1966)
Jill Stone
Johnny Reno (1966)
Nona Williams
Fate Is the Hunter (1964)
Herself, guest star
The Fuzzy Pink Nightgown (1957)
Laurel Stevens
Hot Blood (1956)
Annie Caldash
The Revolt of Mamie Stover (1956)
Mamie Stover
Foxfire (1955)
Amanda [Lawrence Dartland]
Underwater! (1955)
Theresa Grant
The Tall Men (1955)
Nella Turner
Gentlemen Marry Brunettes (1955)
Bonnie Jones/Mimi Jones
The French Line (1954)
Mary "Mame" Carson, also known as Myrtle Brown
Road to Bali (1953)
Herself
Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953)
Dorothy Shaw
Montana Belle (1952)
Belle Starr, also known as Lucy "Montana" Winters
Son of Paleface (1952)
Mike Del Roy, also known as "The Torch"
Macao (1952)
Julie Benton
The Las Vegas Story (1952)
Linda Rollins
Double Dynamite (1951)
Mildred Goodhew
His Kind of Woman (1951)
Lenore Brent, previously known as Liz Brady
The Paleface (1948)
Calamity Jane
Young Widow (1946)
Joan Kenwood
The Outlaw (1943)
Rio McDonald

Music (Feature Film)

Burlesque (2010)
Song Performer

Cast (Special)

100 Years of Hope and Humor (2003)
The 9th Annual Movieguide Awards (2001)
Presenter
Howard Hughes: His Women and His Movies (2000)
Vincent Price: The Versatile Villain (1997)
Private Screenings: Mitchum/Russell (1996)
Herself
The Hollywood Fashion Machine (1995)
Inside The Dream Factory (1995)
The Golden Globe's 50th Anniversary Celebration (1994)
Bob Hope: The First Ninety Years (1993)
49th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1992)
Performer
Bob Hope & Friends: Making New Memories (1991)
Hollywood Stars' Screen Tests (1984)
Bob Hope Special: Bob Hope's Road to Hollywood (1983)
Guest
Hollywood: The Dream Factory (1972)
The Arthur Murray Party For Bob Hope (1960)
Guest
Macreedy's Woman (1958)
Brandy Macreedy

Producer (Special)

Ranier: The Mountain (2000)
Producer

Life Events

1932

Family moved to Van Nuys after father received promotion

1939

Signed to a seven-year contract by film mogul Howard Hughes

1943

Made her film debut in "The Outlaw"; film completed in 1941, and released for a limited showing two years later; had a general release in 1946

1943

Moved with first husband Bob Waterfield to Georgia when he was drafted; put on suspension by Hughes

1946

Re-established professional relationship with Hughes; loaned to United Artists to star in "The Young Widow"

1946

Was well-received in singing stints at the Latin Quarter Club in Miami Beach and on Kay Kyser's "Kollege of Fun and Knowledge" musical program

1948

Enjoyed first genuine success onscreen in "The Paleface" oppposite Bob Hope

1950

Performed stage act in London and New York City

1953

Enjoyed biggest box office success of her career with "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes," co-starring Marilyn Monroe

1954

Weathered censorship scandal surrounding two scenes (one in a bubble bath, the other a dance number) from "The French Line"

1954

Formed Russ-Field Productions with her husband Bob Waterfield as executive producer

1954

Recorded several religious-themed singles and albums with Beryl Davis, Connie Haines and Della Russell (no relation; later replaced by Rhonda Fleming), billed themselves as "The Four Girls"; performed on nightclub circuit and on TV for several years

1955

Negotiated new contract to make five films for Hughes; was to be paid $1000 per week for 20 years

1957

Made last feature film for seven years, the unsuccessful "The Fuzzy Pink Nightgown"

1957

Debuted in a successful solo nightclub act at the Sands Hotel in Las Vegas

1959

Released a self-titled solo album with MGM Records

1964

Returned to film for featured role in "Fate is the Hunter"

1970

Last film to date, "Darker Than Amber"

1971

Made Broadway debut as a replacement for Elaine Stritch in "Company"

1983

Played Rose Hollister on the primetime TV drama, "The Yellow Rose" (NBC)

1985

Wrote her autobiography, Jane Russell: My Path and My Detours

Photo Collections

The Outlaw - Jane Russell Publicity Stills
Here are a few photos of Jane Russell taken to help publicize The Outlaw(1943), produced and directed by Howard Hughes.
The French Line - Lobby Card Set
Here is a set of Lobby Cards from the 3-D release of The French Line (1954), starring Jane Russell. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.
Underwater! - Scene Stills
Here are a few scene stills from RKO's Underwater! (1955), starring Jane Russell.
The Revolt of Mamie Stover - Jane Russell Publicity Still
Here is a photo of Jane Russell taken to help publicize the Fox film The Revolt of Mamie Stover (1956). Here the 20th Century Fox publicity department colorized a black-and-white still for publication in color.
His Kind of Woman - Movie Posters
Here are a few original-release American movie posters from RKO's His Kind of Woman (1951), starring Robert Mitchum and Jane Russell.
His Kind of Woman - Lobby Card
Here is a Lobby Card from RKO's His Kind of Woman (1951). Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.

Videos

Movie Clip

Underwater! (1955) - Telling Theresa Johnny (Richard Egan) narrates as he and pal Dom (Gilbert Roland) spring their sunken treasure scheme on Theresa (who turns out to be a Latina Jane Russell), early in producer Howard Hughes' Underwater!, 1955.
Hot Blood (1956) - Suspicion Of Being Gypsies Los Angeles gypsy Marco (Luther Adler) and gang at the police station where they spring guests Papa (Joseph Calleia), betrothed Annie (Jane Russell) and Xano (Russell's brother Jamie), then groom Sephano/Steve (Cornel Wilde) with his concurrent girlfriend (Helen Westcott), early in Nicholas Ray's Hot Blood, 1956.
Hot Blood (1956) - So, She Dances At her arranged wedding to L-A gypsy Stefan (Cornel Wilde), in-from-Chicago Annie (Jane Russell) has, of her own accord, abandoned their agreed-upon plan to call off the ceremony, instead beginning a traditional dance, with a whip, a wild scene from Nicholas Ray's Hot Blood, 1956.
Underwater! (1955) - Don't Go Down There! In a big payoff scene, Johnny (Richard Egan) dives to the sunken wreck and Theresa (Jane Russell) finally unveils the red suit (featured in the promotional campaign, seen above-decks for the first time) then gets trapped, in Underwater!, 1955, produced by Howard Hughes.
Las Vegas Story, The (1952) - This Is A Windy Town We’ve seen Jane Russell, who has a history in town, and shifty husband Vincent Price arrive at their hotel when Victor Mature, as deputy Andrews, himself part of that history, joins, checking with Drucker (Gordon Oliver), then some would-be newlyweds (Chet Marshall, Colleen Miller), in The Las Vegas Story, 1952.
Las Vegas Story, The (1952) - I Get Along Without You Very Well Jane Russell as ex-Las Vegas songbird Linda explores her old haunts, with nice location footage, dropping in at her old club, where Hoagy Carmichael is still at the piano, flashing-back on her old song, his famous composition, ex-flame Victor Mature included, in The Las Vegas Story, 1952.
Double Dynamite (1951) - He Graduated Magna Cum Nothing! Frank Sinatra (as bank teller Johnny) and pal Emil (Groucho Marx) are talking through walls with his neighbor, fianceè and co-worker “Mibs” (Jane Russell), who thinks he’s been embezzling, hoping to intercept the fur he sent her, and annoyed that she’s dating a rival for revenge, in Double Dynamite, 1951.
Double Dynamite (1951) - On $42.50 A Week Opening introduces Jane Russell as bank teller Mildred and Don McGuire as Bob, the annoying son of the big boss, then Frank Sinatra as fellow teller (and her fianceè) Johnny, getting nowhere seeking a raise from the manager (Harry Hayden), in RKO’s Double Dynamite, 1951, also starring Groucho Marx.
Double Dynamite (1951) - Live Dangerously! Engaged bank tellers Johnny and “Mibs” (Frank Sinatra, Jane Russell) at lunch, just before Christmas, after he’s failed to get the raise he thinks they need to get married, and the first scene for Groucho Marx, who shared top billing, as waiter Emil, in Double Dynamite, 1951.
Double Dynamite (1951) - I Don't Wear Shirts At Christmas-time in Los Angeles, broke bank teller Johnny (Frank Sinatra) has just rescued Nestor Paiva (whom we’ll learn is Hot Horse Harris, a big time bookie) from muggers, and he insists on compensation, Lou Nova as Santa, Joe Devlin the muscle, in Double Dynamite, 1951, also starring Jane Russell and Groucho Marx.
His Kind Of Woman (1951) - I Might Forget What I'm Doing Ebullient after the screening of one of his pictures at a Mexican resort, philandering actor Cardigan (Vincent Price) visits his paramour Lenore (Jane Russell) and fugitive gambler Dan (Robert Mitchum), then she confirms that musician Harry (Stacy Harris) really does know her from a previous life, into her song by Jimmy McHugh and Harold Adamson, in His Kind Of Woman, 1951.
His Kind Of Woman (1951) - Where Do Old Gangsters Go To Die? Opening is narrated by Charles McGraw who will soon appear as gang henchman Thompson, introducing Raymond Burr as exiled gangster Ferraro (modeled on Lucky Luciano), who calls Corle (Paul Frees), John Mylong their third party, John Farrow directing, in His Kind Of Woman, starring Robert Mitchum and Jane Russell.

Trailer

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes - (Original Trailer) Gentlemen prefer Marilyn Monroe preferring diamonds in her most famous musical Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953) directed by Howard Hawks.
Macao -- (Original Trailer) The original theatrical trailer for Macao, 1952, in which Josef von Sternberg, the director of The Blue Angel (1930), tried his hand at a film noir mystery, with Robert Mitchum and Jane Russell.
Underwater! -- (Original Trailer) Divers race the clock to find a Caribbean treasure before modern-day pirates can catch up to them in Underwater! (1955).
His Kind Of Woman -- (Original Trailer) Robert Mitchum, down on his luck, gets involved with gangsters down Mexico way in this 1951 film noir thriller directed by John Farrow.
French Line, The -- (Original Trailer) "Jane Russell in 3-D - It'll knock both your eyes out!" was producer Howard Hughes tagline for the color musical The French Line (1954).
Outlaw, The - (Original Trailer) Billy the Kid and Doc Holliday fight over possession of sultry Mexican girl Jane Russell in Howard Hughes' western The Outlaw (1943).
Gentlemen Marry Brunettes -- (Original Trailer) Jane Russell and Jeanne Crain in Gentlemen Marry Brunettes (1955), the sequel to Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953).
Montana Belle -- (Original Trailer) The Daltons force Belle Star (Jane Russell) to help them on a dangerous raid.
Paleface, The - (Original Trailer) An inept dentist (Bob Hope) must rescue his outlaw wife from the Indians in The Paleface (1948) co-starring Jane Russell.
Las Vegas Story, The -- (Original Trailer) Casablanca comes to Nevada with Victor Mature as a gambler who encounters newly married former love Jane Russell in The Las Vegas Story (1952).
Double Dynamite -- (Original Trailer) A bank teller (Frank Sinatra) reaps the rewards of saving a gangster's life, but can't reveal where he got the money in Double Dynamite (1951).

Family

Roy William Russell
Father
Office manager, businessman. Died in 1937 after a gallstone operation.
Geraldine Russell
Mother
Actor, speech and drama teacher.
Thomas Russell
Brother
Born in 1924.
Kenneth Russell
Brother
Born in 1925.
Jamie Russell
Brother
Born in 1927.
Wallace Russell
Brother
Born in 1929.
Tracy Waterfield
Daughter
Adopted as newborn on February 15, 1952.
Thomas Waterfield
Son
Adopted as infant in December 1952.
Robert John Waterfield Jr
Son
Adopted when nine months old in 1956.

Companions

Bob Waterfield
Husband
Football player, coach. Played quarterback professionally for the Cleveland Rams, later became coach of the Los Angeles Rams; highschool sweethearts; married on April 24, 1943; Russell filed for divorce February 2, 1967 and received final decree in July 1968; Russell received custody of two older children and Waterfield received the youngest child; died in 1983.
Roger Barrett
Husband
Actor. Born c. 1921; met while doing stock work together in Niles, Michigan; married on August 25, 1968; died of a heart attack on November 17, 1968.
John Calvin Peoples
Husband
Business executive. Born c. 1925; married from January 31, 1974 until his death in 1999.

Bibliography

"My Path and Detours"
Jane Russell (1985)

Notes

James Robert Parish has characterized certain aspects of Russell's star persona, performance style and personality as follows: "tough babe with a heart of gold, a liberated female who still craves to be dominated by a right guy, a former small-town innocent who has drifted into the morally ambiguous world of show business and now has the scars to prove her apprenticeship. What distinguished Jane's screen presence was her marvelously unpretentious attitude. She is totally un-self-conscious about her too-well-proportioned torso, equally unimpressed by her thrush abilities (modest as they are), and plainly aware that she may not be the most intellectual broad around town, and she is totally well intentioned." (Quoted from "The RKO Gals", Arlington House, 1974)

Evidence of Howard Hughes's bosom fixation may be found in such remarks about Russell as "There are two reasons why men will pay to see her." Hughes was not alone, however, in making sarcastic remarks about Russell's cleavage. Bob Hope, for instance, once introduced her as "the two and only Jane Russell".

The trailer for the 1955 Jane Russell-Cornel Wilde film, "Hot Blood" sported the following opening line over a shot of Russell doing a "gypsy" dance: "Jane Russell shakes her tambourines and drives Cornel wild!" --quoted in The Hollywood Reporter, September 24, 1991.

In 1956, co-founded (with Irene Dunne, Loretta Young, and June Allyson) WAIF, an adoption organization that seeks to place older, handicapped, foreign-born and minority children with adoptive families.