His Kind of Woman


2h 2m 1951
His Kind of Woman

Brief Synopsis

A deported gangster causes problems for guests at a Mexican resort.

Film Details

Also Known As
Killer with a Smile, Smiler with a Gun
Genre
Crime
Adaptation
Film Noir
Classic Hollywood
Release Date
Aug 25, 1951
Premiere Information
Philadelphia, PA opening: 15 Aug 1951
Production Company
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 2m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
10,792ft (13 reels)

Synopsis

Gangster Nick Ferraro, who has been living in Naples since his deportation from the United States, is anxious to return to the States to put his lucrative enterprises in order. To accomplish this, he and his cohorts in the States and Mexico--Corle, Thompson and Martin Krafft--select an unwitting gambler named Dan Milner, whose weight and height match Ferraro's, to provide Ferraro with a new identity. Corle offers Dan $50,000 to go to Mexico for a year, without revealing who is paying him or why. Broke, Dan accepts the initial $20,000 payment and travels to Nogales, Mexico, to receive further instructions. While waiting for a plane to take him to his final destination, Dan meets Lenore Brent, a beautiful heiress and polished singer. To his surprise, he and Lenore board the same charter plane, which Dan finally learns is headed for Morro's Lodge in Baja California. At the remote, exclusive resort, owner José Morro questions Dan about his background, while guest Myron Winton, an investment banker, fills him in on some of the lodge's more mysterious guests, including Krafft, who is posing as a chess-playing writer. Dan then meets Hollywood actor Mark Cardigan, who is also an avid hunter. Dan soon becomes suspicious of Krafft and Thompson after he discovers they have bungalows next to his. Anxious to know what is going on, Dan confronts Krafft and the gun-wielding Thompson, who give him another $10,000 and assure him that he will find out more from a man who is en route to the lodge. The next day, after noticing Myron flirting with Jennie Stone, an unhappy newlywed, Dan deduces that Lenore is having an affair with Mark. Unknown to Dan, Lenore is actually Liz Brady, a former singer who is posing as an heiress in order to marry Mark, who is estranged from his wife Helen. After the soft-hearted Dan helps Jennie's husband Milton beat Myron at poker and thereby eliminate his debt to the banker, he asks Morro about the man he is to meet. Morro claims ignorance, then tries to discourage a drunk pilot, Bill Lusk, from landing at the resort, as a serious storm is approaching. Dan and Lenore watch Bill crash-land near the lodge, and in the moonlight, Dan impulsively kisses Lenore. The next day, Mark's personal manager, Gerald Hobson, arrives at the lodge with Helen, who has halted her divorce proceedings and wants to rejoin her husband. Mark rejects the idea, even though Gerald warns him that his publicized affair with Lenore could cost him his career. Dan then corners Bill and accuses him of faking his drunkenness. Bill confesses that he is an undercover Immigration Department agent and reveals that Dan has sold his identity to a notorious gangster, who has hired Krafft, an ex-Nazi plastic surgeon, to alter his face to resemble Dan's. Despite Bill's warnings, Dan refuses to cooperate with the agent, and later, while searching Morro's office, Bill is caught by Thompson and murdered. After Dan and Lenore come across Bill's body on the beach, Dan orders Lenore to leave the lodge out of concern for her safety. In his bungalow, Dan then is accosted by Thompson and two thugs and announces he is backing out of the deal. The thugs outdraw Dan, but Dan is able to alert Lenore to his predicament before he is forced into the boat that is to take him to Ferraro's yacht. Lenore entreats Mark to come to Dan's rescue, and Mark, anxious to prove he is a genuine hero, eagerly accepts the challenge. Dan, meanwhile, manages to escape from Thompson and swim to shore, but as soon as he tells Mark that the man on the boat is Ferraro, he sneaks back onto the yacht. Dan is soon being chased by the ship's crew and, despite shooting holes in the ship's steam pipes, is captured and brought to Ferraro. The gangster condemns Dan as a "welcher" and orders his men to beat him, then forces him to repair the steam pipes. Meanwhile, on the beach, Mark uses his hunting skills to pick off Thompson and his cohorts and leads the Mexican police and some volunteer fighters to Ferraro's yacht. Realizing that his scheme is doomed, Ferraro prepares to shoot Dan, but is stopped by the arrival of Mark and the police. While they and the ship's crew engage in a gunfight on the deck, Krafft suggests to Ferraro that he can inject Dan with some anesthesia, which will render him helpless and cause him to develop amnesia and die within a year. Desperate, Ferraro orders that Dan be injected, but Dan struggles and prevents the needle from pricking his skin. Ferraro and his men are finally routed, and later, while the Shakespeare-quoting Mark is hailed as a real hero by the press, Lenore, who has confessed her impersonation, gives up her gold-digging ways and pledges herself to Dan.

Photo Collections

His Kind of Woman - Movie Posters
Here are a few original-release American movie posters from RKO's His Kind of Woman (1951), starring Robert Mitchum and Jane Russell.
His Kind of Woman - Lobby Card
Here is a Lobby Card from RKO's His Kind of Woman (1951). Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.

Videos

Movie Clip

His Kind Of Woman (1951) - I Might Forget What I'm Doing Ebullient after the screening of one of his pictures at a Mexican resort, philandering actor Cardigan (Vincent Price) visits his paramour Lenore (Jane Russell) and fugitive gambler Dan (Robert Mitchum), then she confirms that musician Harry (Stacy Harris) really does know her from a previous life, into her song by Jimmy McHugh and Harold Adamson, in His Kind Of Woman, 1951.
His Kind Of Woman (1951) - Where Do Old Gangsters Go To Die? Opening is narrated by Charles McGraw who will soon appear as gang henchman Thompson, introducing Raymond Burr as exiled gangster Ferraro (modeled on Lucky Luciano), who calls Corle (Paul Frees), John Mylong their third party, John Farrow directing, in His Kind Of Woman, starring Robert Mitchum and Jane Russell.
His Kind Of Woman (1951) - Who's Happily Married? Ever more embittered paid girlfriend Lenore (Jane Russell) and her new confidant Dan (Robert Mitchum) at a Mexican resort have been summoned by her movie actor sponsor Mark Cardigan (Vincent Price), informing him that his wife has arrived, his agent (Carleton G. Young) attempting a rescue, in His Kind Of Woman, 1951.
His Kind Of Woman (1951) - You Don't Like Fish? Not much story accomplished here but a money scene nonetheless, for attitude from Jane Russell as Lenore in her swimsuit and Robert Mitchum as busted gambler Dan, sent to a Mexican resort by gangsters for a mission he doesn’t yet understand, Jim Backus and Leslye Manning as other goofy guests, in His Kind Of Woman, 1951, from Howard Hughes’ RKO.
His Kind Of Woman (1951) - You're Being Paged Working the crowd at Morro's resort in Baja, Dan (Robert Mitchum) with nervous bride Jennie (Leslye Banning), mysterious Kraft (John Mylong), dishy Lenore (Jane Russell) and, in his first appearance, vacationing movie actor Cardigan (Vincent Price), in John Farrow's His Kind Of Woman, 1951.
His Kind Of Woman (1951) - Spoiled Child Of The Poor Dan (Robert Mitchum), now in a Nogales bar, has his first encounter with Lenore (Jane Russell) singing Five Little Miles From San Berdoo by Sam Coslow, in John Farrow's His Kind Of Woman, 1951.
His Kind Of Woman (1951) - I Don't Know You Guys Very casual, in his second scene, broke gambler Dan Milner (Robert Mitchum) is unimpressed to find thugs (led by Tol Avery) playing cards in his apartment, early in John Farrow's His Kind Of Woman, 1951.

Trailer

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Also Known As
Killer with a Smile, Smiler with a Gun
Genre
Crime
Adaptation
Film Noir
Classic Hollywood
Release Date
Aug 25, 1951
Premiere Information
Philadelphia, PA opening: 15 Aug 1951
Production Company
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 2m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
10,792ft (13 reels)

Articles

His Kind of Woman


It could have been a major train wreck but His Kind of Woman (1951) is surprisingly entertaining. Its style is film noir, but it's as wacky as it is tense. Its comedy is raucous, thanks largely to Vincent Price's memorable histrionics. Its melodrama and violence are over-the-top. Its sexual innuendo is everywhere and it manages to showcase three songs, all of them performed by Jane Russell. It's also crude and course yet boasts high production values. And in some crazy way, it all holds together throughout its two hour plus running time.

Robert Mitchum stars as a professional gambler who's offered $50,000 to go to a Mexican resort and await further instructions. On the way, he meets sultry Jane Russell, and the sparks fly oh-so-obviously but deliciously as they travel the rest of the way together. In Mexico, Mitchum learns that his "job" is to provide his face to Raymond Burr, a mobster who is wanted by U.S. authorities and who has determined that the best way for him to get back into the country is to have his face altered by plastic surgery into that of Mitchum's. (Burr's character was based on real-life gangster "Lucky" Luciano.) Meanwhile, Mitchum and Russell keep up their animal-like seduction even though Russell has been having an affair with a married guest at the resort, Vincent Price.

Price seems to be having the time of his life in His Kind of Woman, playing a ham actor in one of the funniest and most outrageous performances of his career. When producer Howard Hughes saw what Price was doing with the part, he loved it and drummed up some more comedy sequences for him. This, in contrast to the dramatic scenes of Mitchum sparring with Burr, made the film wildly uneven in tone. Price later wrote, "I think Bob [Mitchum] was disappointed at the direction the script took because if he had known about the comic tilt, he would have played his character in a lighter vein."

Price also wrote that Mitchum was "heaven to work with...one of those diamond in the rough types in whose character you can't find any sort of holes because he's so open and honest...He's a complete anachronism. He claims he doesn't care about acting, but he's an extraordinary actor. He's one of that group of people in Hollywood who are such extraordinary personalities that people forget they're marvelous actors." Mitchum was very generous on set, treating about 20 cast and crew members to lunch in his bungalow every day, and "on several occasions when he realized his stand-in had had a rough night, he stood in for the stand-in."

Jane Russell in this picture has been described by one writer as "a towering, walking, jiggling assemblance of pulchritudinous flesh which bursts forth from specially designed skimpy costumes, especially a black bathing suit that is hardly there." It's true that the actress models more tight-fitting outfits here than one can count, and while this is entertaining, it's also the result of Howard Hughes's infantile obsession with her cleavage. Before shooting started on Macao (1952), Russell's next picture for Hughes, the eccentric producer wrote a famous memo to his studio manager with specific instructions as to the types of bras and outfits the actress should wear: "I want her wardrobe, wherever possible, to be low-necked (and by that I mean as low as the law allows) so that the customers can get a look at the part of Russell which they pay to see," wrote Hughes. In any event, Russell gets away with it in His Kind of Woman because her attitude comes off as totally unpretentious and matter-of-fact. She's in on the joke.

Director John Farrow (and an uncredited Richard Fleischer) do a good job with the sordid, pulp fiction material. The scene where Mitchum is stripped to the waist, savagely beaten, and restrained so that a dangerous drug can be injected into him is outrageously over the top in terms of how it is written, but Fleischer's choices of lighting and angles make it thrilling and gorgeous. This is a scene that must be seen to be believed! Farrow and Mitchum got along very well together. They had met socially a couple of years before this film and went on a marathon drinking match. From that auspicious beginning a friendship formed, leading to a collaboration on the 1950 film noir Where Danger Lives and then this follow-up.

His Kind of Woman was finished in May 1950 but sat on the shelf until September 1951. Hughes originally envisioned teaming Mitchum and Russell in a series of films a la Bogart and Bacall, but only one more pairing, Macao, ever materialized. That film was shot in the fall of 1950 and it, too, sat on the shelf for well over a year before it was released.

Producer: Howard Hughes, Robert Sparks
Director: John Farrow
Screenplay: Gerald Drayson Adams (story), Frank Fenton, Jack Leonard
Cinematography: Harry J. Wild
Film Editing: Frederic Knudtson, Eda Warren
Art Direction: Albert S. D'Agostino
Music: Leigh Harline, Harold Adamson
Cast: Robert Mitchum (Dan Milner), Jane Russell (Lenore Brent), Vincent Price (Mark Cardigan), Tim Holt (Bill Lusk), Charles McGraw (Thompson), Marjorie Reynolds (Helen Cardigan).
BW-121m.

by Jeremy Arnold
His Kind Of Woman

His Kind of Woman

It could have been a major train wreck but His Kind of Woman (1951) is surprisingly entertaining. Its style is film noir, but it's as wacky as it is tense. Its comedy is raucous, thanks largely to Vincent Price's memorable histrionics. Its melodrama and violence are over-the-top. Its sexual innuendo is everywhere and it manages to showcase three songs, all of them performed by Jane Russell. It's also crude and course yet boasts high production values. And in some crazy way, it all holds together throughout its two hour plus running time. Robert Mitchum stars as a professional gambler who's offered $50,000 to go to a Mexican resort and await further instructions. On the way, he meets sultry Jane Russell, and the sparks fly oh-so-obviously but deliciously as they travel the rest of the way together. In Mexico, Mitchum learns that his "job" is to provide his face to Raymond Burr, a mobster who is wanted by U.S. authorities and who has determined that the best way for him to get back into the country is to have his face altered by plastic surgery into that of Mitchum's. (Burr's character was based on real-life gangster "Lucky" Luciano.) Meanwhile, Mitchum and Russell keep up their animal-like seduction even though Russell has been having an affair with a married guest at the resort, Vincent Price. Price seems to be having the time of his life in His Kind of Woman, playing a ham actor in one of the funniest and most outrageous performances of his career. When producer Howard Hughes saw what Price was doing with the part, he loved it and drummed up some more comedy sequences for him. This, in contrast to the dramatic scenes of Mitchum sparring with Burr, made the film wildly uneven in tone. Price later wrote, "I think Bob [Mitchum] was disappointed at the direction the script took because if he had known about the comic tilt, he would have played his character in a lighter vein." Price also wrote that Mitchum was "heaven to work with...one of those diamond in the rough types in whose character you can't find any sort of holes because he's so open and honest...He's a complete anachronism. He claims he doesn't care about acting, but he's an extraordinary actor. He's one of that group of people in Hollywood who are such extraordinary personalities that people forget they're marvelous actors." Mitchum was very generous on set, treating about 20 cast and crew members to lunch in his bungalow every day, and "on several occasions when he realized his stand-in had had a rough night, he stood in for the stand-in." Jane Russell in this picture has been described by one writer as "a towering, walking, jiggling assemblance of pulchritudinous flesh which bursts forth from specially designed skimpy costumes, especially a black bathing suit that is hardly there." It's true that the actress models more tight-fitting outfits here than one can count, and while this is entertaining, it's also the result of Howard Hughes's infantile obsession with her cleavage. Before shooting started on Macao (1952), Russell's next picture for Hughes, the eccentric producer wrote a famous memo to his studio manager with specific instructions as to the types of bras and outfits the actress should wear: "I want her wardrobe, wherever possible, to be low-necked (and by that I mean as low as the law allows) so that the customers can get a look at the part of Russell which they pay to see," wrote Hughes. In any event, Russell gets away with it in His Kind of Woman because her attitude comes off as totally unpretentious and matter-of-fact. She's in on the joke. Director John Farrow (and an uncredited Richard Fleischer) do a good job with the sordid, pulp fiction material. The scene where Mitchum is stripped to the waist, savagely beaten, and restrained so that a dangerous drug can be injected into him is outrageously over the top in terms of how it is written, but Fleischer's choices of lighting and angles make it thrilling and gorgeous. This is a scene that must be seen to be believed! Farrow and Mitchum got along very well together. They had met socially a couple of years before this film and went on a marathon drinking match. From that auspicious beginning a friendship formed, leading to a collaboration on the 1950 film noir Where Danger Lives and then this follow-up. His Kind of Woman was finished in May 1950 but sat on the shelf until September 1951. Hughes originally envisioned teaming Mitchum and Russell in a series of films a la Bogart and Bacall, but only one more pairing, Macao, ever materialized. That film was shot in the fall of 1950 and it, too, sat on the shelf for well over a year before it was released. Producer: Howard Hughes, Robert Sparks Director: John Farrow Screenplay: Gerald Drayson Adams (story), Frank Fenton, Jack Leonard Cinematography: Harry J. Wild Film Editing: Frederic Knudtson, Eda Warren Art Direction: Albert S. D'Agostino Music: Leigh Harline, Harold Adamson Cast: Robert Mitchum (Dan Milner), Jane Russell (Lenore Brent), Vincent Price (Mark Cardigan), Tim Holt (Bill Lusk), Charles McGraw (Thompson), Marjorie Reynolds (Helen Cardigan). BW-121m. by Jeremy Arnold

His Kind of Woman - Robert Mitchum in HIS KIND OF WOMAN on DVD in Volume 3 of The Film Noir Classic Collection


Somehow, His Kind of Woman (1951) works. By any means it really shouldn't, with its over-the-top violence and satirical comedy intercut sometimes from one shot to the next. The result is sort of a combination of film noir and noir satire at one and the same time.

Now available on DVD from Warner Home Video as part of the Film Noir Classic Collection Vol. 3, His Kind of Woman is a strange, uneven film, though hugely entertaining. Robert Mitchum is offered $50,000 by some shady characters to go to a Mexican resort and await further instructions. He needs the dough, so he does it. Eventually (nearly halfway into the picture, in fact), he and we finally learn what the job is. Let's just say that tough mobster Raymond Burr can't show his face in the U.S. anymore but wants to go back anyway - and that's where Mitchum comes in. Meanwhile, there are all types of crazy characters floating around, including Jane Russell as a sultry singer having an affair with the married Vincent Price. That doesn't stop the double entendres from flying between Mitchum and Russell, however. And as for Price, he plays a ham actor and amateur hunter, skills which come in very handy as the story plays out. Price delivers one of the funniest performance of his career, throwing himself into his hilarious lines with obvious pleasure.

He is so funny, in fact, that it just underscores what a bizarre movie he's in. No one else in the film hams it up as Price does, which could easily have led to Price coming off as grating and tiresome, especially in contrast to the sadistic scenes of Mitchum being tortured (which are considerable). But we accept it all, probably because it's all equally over-the-top. That's certainly a trademark of producer Howard Hughes, who owned RKO at the time and involved himself obsessively in the film's script and production. The eccentric Hughes decided after filming was done to cast Raymond Burr; another actor had played the part, and all scenes involving the character were re-shot with Burr. Then Hughes decided he didn't like the way John Farrow had directed the final chase and torture sequence on a ship, so he brought in Richard Fleischer to re-shoot it at considerable time and expense. Hughes pretty much told Fleischer how he wanted it shot, stressing the sadism and drawing it out far more than Farrow had. From the sound of it, Hughes might as well have just directed it himself.

In her commentary track, UCLA professor Vivian Sobchack relates these production problems and Hughes' obsessions in greater detail, and makes the astute observation that the gratuitousness of Fleischer's ship sequence stands in contrast to the fights earlier in the film directed by Farrow, which place most of the violence off screen - yet another reason the movie feels uneven. She also details the Breen office's many objections to His Kind of Woman, mostly to the sexual innuendo. It's interesting, but she does tend to repeat herself and too often simply points out on screen what we can easily see for ourselves.

There are no other extras, but the box set comes with a separate disc devoted to short subjects and a film noir documentary. Print quality is a little uneven (like the movie itself!), with the title sequence and a few other shots looking grainy or scratchy, but the bulk of the film looks sharp.

For more information about His Kind of Woman, visit Fox Home Entertainment. To order His Kind of Woman, go to TCM Shopping.

By Jeremy Arnold

His Kind of Woman - Robert Mitchum in HIS KIND OF WOMAN on DVD in Volume 3 of The Film Noir Classic Collection

Somehow, His Kind of Woman (1951) works. By any means it really shouldn't, with its over-the-top violence and satirical comedy intercut sometimes from one shot to the next. The result is sort of a combination of film noir and noir satire at one and the same time. Now available on DVD from Warner Home Video as part of the Film Noir Classic Collection Vol. 3, His Kind of Woman is a strange, uneven film, though hugely entertaining. Robert Mitchum is offered $50,000 by some shady characters to go to a Mexican resort and await further instructions. He needs the dough, so he does it. Eventually (nearly halfway into the picture, in fact), he and we finally learn what the job is. Let's just say that tough mobster Raymond Burr can't show his face in the U.S. anymore but wants to go back anyway - and that's where Mitchum comes in. Meanwhile, there are all types of crazy characters floating around, including Jane Russell as a sultry singer having an affair with the married Vincent Price. That doesn't stop the double entendres from flying between Mitchum and Russell, however. And as for Price, he plays a ham actor and amateur hunter, skills which come in very handy as the story plays out. Price delivers one of the funniest performance of his career, throwing himself into his hilarious lines with obvious pleasure. He is so funny, in fact, that it just underscores what a bizarre movie he's in. No one else in the film hams it up as Price does, which could easily have led to Price coming off as grating and tiresome, especially in contrast to the sadistic scenes of Mitchum being tortured (which are considerable). But we accept it all, probably because it's all equally over-the-top. That's certainly a trademark of producer Howard Hughes, who owned RKO at the time and involved himself obsessively in the film's script and production. The eccentric Hughes decided after filming was done to cast Raymond Burr; another actor had played the part, and all scenes involving the character were re-shot with Burr. Then Hughes decided he didn't like the way John Farrow had directed the final chase and torture sequence on a ship, so he brought in Richard Fleischer to re-shoot it at considerable time and expense. Hughes pretty much told Fleischer how he wanted it shot, stressing the sadism and drawing it out far more than Farrow had. From the sound of it, Hughes might as well have just directed it himself. In her commentary track, UCLA professor Vivian Sobchack relates these production problems and Hughes' obsessions in greater detail, and makes the astute observation that the gratuitousness of Fleischer's ship sequence stands in contrast to the fights earlier in the film directed by Farrow, which place most of the violence off screen - yet another reason the movie feels uneven. She also details the Breen office's many objections to His Kind of Woman, mostly to the sexual innuendo. It's interesting, but she does tend to repeat herself and too often simply points out on screen what we can easily see for ourselves. There are no other extras, but the box set comes with a separate disc devoted to short subjects and a film noir documentary. Print quality is a little uneven (like the movie itself!), with the title sequence and a few other shots looking grainy or scratchy, but the bulk of the film looks sharp. For more information about His Kind of Woman, visit Fox Home Entertainment. To order His Kind of Woman, go to TCM Shopping. By Jeremy Arnold

Quotes

Do you mind if I join you?
- Dan Milner
Seems you have.
- Lenore Brent
She is beautiful as well as interesting, isn't she?
- Jose Morro
She's beautiful - that's always interesting.
- Dan Milner
I'm too young to die. How about you?
- Dan Milner
Too well-known.
- Mark Cardigan
I'll see ya all of a sudden, Sam.
- Dan Milner
If you use that needle to sow with, you'd be a much happier woman.
- Cardigan, Mark
You killed Ferraro, how did it feel?
- Lenore Brent
He didn't say.
- Dan Milner

Trivia

John Farrow finished the film, but Howard Hughes (I) brought in Richard Fleischer to add a few shots. (Hughes himself co-wrote the ending with Fleischer.) Fleischer ended up reshooting the entire film.

Notes

The working titles of this film were Smiler with a Gun and Killer with a Smile. The title of Frank Fenton and Jack Leonard's screen story was "The Big Bullet." Onscreen credits note that Jane Russell sang the Jimmy McHugh and Harold Adamson song "You'll Know" in the picture. A third song by McHugh and Adamson, titled "Kiss and Run," was written for the film but not used, according to an April 1950 Hollywood Reporter news item. Opening scenes include brief voice-over narration and inserts of maps. Although early 1949 Hollywood Reporter news items reported that RKO owned the rights to a Gerald Drayson Adams' screenplay entitled Star Sapphire, which was re-titled His Kind of Woman in late 1949, and that Robert Mitchum and Russell were to star in that project, it does not appear that Adams' script is related to this picture. According to a February 1949 Hollywood Reporter item, Star Sapphire is the story of a doctor who becomes an amateur sleuth in order to clear his name.
       In October 1949, Hollywood Reporter announced that John Cromwell was being considered as the director of His Kind of Woman. RKO borrowed Leslye Banning from Universal-International for the production. According to the Newsweek review, RKO producers Jerry Wald and Norman Krasna "doctored" the picture, which RKO head Howard Hughes ordered shelved for fifteen months. The exact nature of Wald and Krasna's contribution to the final film, if any, has not been determined. Many reviewers commented on the film's two-hour running time, noting that the studio planned to cut approximately thirty minutes of footage before the picture's general release, but these cuts apparently were never made. Various news items reported that the film ran afoul of London censors because a billboard painted by Mario Zamparelli advertising the picture showed too much of Russell's cleavage. Modern sources note that the London censors also objected to the billboard's "tag line"-"the hottest combination ever." To appease the censors, the line, written by Hedda Hopper to describe the teaming of Russell and Mitchum, was changed to "the greatest combination ever." Just prior to the picture's Los Angeles September 1951 release, a thirty-ton, gilt-framed reproduction of Zamparelli's oil painting was erected on the corner of Fairfax and Wilshire Boulevards, according to news items. According to modern sources, Raymond Burr actually knocked out Mitchum during a take of their fight scene. Modern sources add Mamie Van Doren to the cast, but she was not identifiable in the viewed print.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer August 25, 1951

Released in United States Summer August 25, 1951