Herbert Rudley


About

Also Known As
Herb Rudley
Birth Place
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Born
March 22, 1910
Died
September 09, 2006
Cause of Death
Heart Attack

Biography

Herbert Rudley was an actor who had a successful Hollywood career. Rudley began his acting career appearing in various films, such as "Abe Lincoln in Illinois" (1940), the drama "The Master Race" (1944) with George Coulouris and the Spencer Tracy drama "The Seventh Cross" (1944). He also appeared in the Lana Turner drama "Marriage Is a Private Affair" (1944), "Brewster's Millions" (...

Biography

Herbert Rudley was an actor who had a successful Hollywood career. Rudley began his acting career appearing in various films, such as "Abe Lincoln in Illinois" (1940), the drama "The Master Race" (1944) with George Coulouris and the Spencer Tracy drama "The Seventh Cross" (1944). He also appeared in the Lana Turner drama "Marriage Is a Private Affair" (1944), "Brewster's Millions" (1945) with Dennis O'Keefe and "Rhapsody in Blue" (1945). He kept working in film throughout the fifties, starring in "Joan of Arc" (1950) with Ingrid Bergman, the Virginia Mayo dramatic adaptation "The Silver Chalice" (1954) and the comedic adaptation "Artists and Models" (1955) with Dean Martin. He also appeared in "The Court Jester" (1956) with Danny Kaye. Toward the end of his career, he continued to act in the dramatic adaptation "The Big Fisherman" (1959) with Howard Keel, the Jeff Chandler western "The Jayhawkers" (1959) and the Audie Murphy adaptation "Hell Bent For Leather" (1960). He also appeared in "The Great Impostor" (1960) and "Follow That Dream" (1962). Rudley last acted in the comedy "Falling in Love Again" (1980) with Elliott Gould. Rudley passed away in September 2006 at the age of 95.

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Brewster's Millions (1945) - Maybe Them Nazis Are Suing Having just arrived home, soldier Monty Brewster (Dennis O'Keefe), family and pals get news of great wealth from the unexpected Swearengen Jones (John Litel) in Brewster's Millions, 1945.
Brewster's Millions (1945) - On Our Way To The Poorhouse Mickey (Mischa Auer) and Trixie (June Havoc, her first scene) arrive to tell Monty (Dennis O’Keefe, title character) the Philadelphia show, designed to burn money, had to close, fianceè Peggy (Helen Walker) and pals (Joe Sawyer, Herbert Rudley) helping, in Brewster’s Millions, 1945.
Brewster's Millions (1945) - Open, He's Completely Whole Again Most of the key players including Jackson (Eddie "Rochester" Anderson), Peggy (Helen Walker) and soldier Monty Brewster (Dennis O'Keefe) are introduced in the opening to Brewster's Millions, 1945.
Brewster's Millions (1945) - Brewster And Company Suddenly under a secret obligation to spend a million dollars fast, Monty (Dennis O'Keefe) baffles friends and family (Herbert Rudley, Joe Sawyer, Eddie "Rochester" Anderson, Helen Walker) in Brewster's Millions, 1945.
Brewster's Millions (1945) - Black Magic Watching on an early TV, the Brewster and Company crew (Eddie "Rochester" Anderson, Helen Walker, Joe Sawyer and Herbert Rudley) don't realize Monty (Dennis O'Keefe) is trying to lose money on a horse race in Brewster's Millions, 1945.
Hollow Triumph (1948) -- My Lucky Night Producer and star Paul Henreid (as "Muller") with partner Marcy (Herbert Rudley) and gang, robbing an underground casino, almost getting away, in Hollow Triumph, 1948, directed by Steve Sekely.
Hollow Triumph (1948) -- You Won't Take It Neat opening, producer and star Paul Henreid, being described as he's about to be paroled, picked up by pal Marcy (Herbert Rudley), with blonde (Ann Staunton), from Hollow Triumph, 1948, directed by Steve Sekely.
Rhapsody In Blue (1945) - A Fella's Gotta Start Somewhere First scene for Robert Alda as grown-up Bronxite George Gershwin, with brother Ira (Herbert Rudley) and parents (Rosemary DeCamp, Morris Carnovsky), when a message from Chico Marx leads to a meeting with an insulting Vaudevillian (Andrew Tombes), in Warner Bros.’ bio-pic Rhapsody In Blue, 1945.
Black Sleep, The (1956) - Opening, He Is As A Dead Man Producers getting their money’s worth with leading man Basil Rathbone’s opening narration, credits, then in character he visits a London prison where surgeon Ramsay (Herbert Rudley) faces execution, early exposition in the quasi-independent Bel-Air Productions feature The Black Sleep, 1956.
Black Sleep, The (1956) - Maybe We Should Have Confined Him Mad-ish scientist Cadman (Basil Rathbone) brings Dr. Gordon (Herbert Rudley), whom he rescued from hanging because he needed an assistant, to his home, where we meet Casimir, Laurie, Mungo and Daphne (Bela Lugosi, Patricia Blair, Lon Chaney Jr., Phyllis Stanley) in The Black Sleep, 1956.
Black Sleep, The (1956) - Anything Is Justified In his nifty secret coastal operating lab, Dr. Cadman (Basil Rathbone), assisted by Laurie and Daphne (Patricia Blake, Phyllis Stanley) alarms Gordon (Herbert Rudley), the surgeon he recently saved from execution, with his work on “K-6” (George Sawaya, in The Black Sleep, 1956.
Black Sleep, The (1956) - I Am Bohemond The Crusader Significant spoiler here, as Gordon (Herbert Rudley) and Laurie (Patricia Blake) have penetrated the secret wing where their employer Cadman (Basil Rathbone) imprisons his subjects, including John Carradine, George Sawaya, Sally Yarnell and Tor Johnson, the freak show, in The Black Sleep, 1956.

Bibliography