The Turning Point


1h 59m 1977

Brief Synopsis

The story of two women whose lives are dedicated to ballet. Deedee left her promising dance career to become a wife and mother and now runs a ballet school in Oklahoma. Emma stayed with a company and became a star though her time is nearly past. Both want what the other has and reflects back on missed chances as they are brought together again through Deedee's daughter who joins the company.

Film Details

Also Known As
Turning Point, tournant de la vie
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1977
Production Company
20th Century Fox
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox; 20th Century Fox Distribution; Rank Film Distributors Ltd
Location
New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 59m
Sound
Dolby
Color
Color (DeLuxe)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

Former dance colleagues Deedee and Emma are reunited when Emma's New York ballet company stops in Oklahoma City for a performance. Having dropped her career for marriage and motherhood, Deedee envies prima ballerina Emma's limelight life; aging Emma, realizing that her days as a star are numbered, wishes that she had the fulfillment of a family like Deedee's. Tensions simmer when Deedee's talented teenage daughter Emilia moves to New York to join Emma's company. As Emma maternally bonds with Emilia, and Emilia falls in love with womanizing dancer Yuri, Deedee feels that she's losing her place even as a mother. After Emilia's triumphant debut, Deedee's and Emma's resentments boil over into an all-out catfight that ends when they realize that they can unite in happiness for Emilia's future.

Crew

Adolphe Adam

Music ("Le Corsaire" "Giselle")

Alvin Ailey

Choreography ("Vortex")

Lucette Aldous

Choreography ("Black Swan")

Frederick Ashton

Choreography ("Etude")

George Balanchine

Choreography ("Pas De Deux")

Anne Bancroft

Choreography ("Anna Karenina")

Mikhail Baryshnikov

Choreography ("Aurora'S Wedding" "Le Corsaire")

Tony Bishop

Assistant Director

Albert Brenner

Production Designer

Leslie Browne

Choreography ("Vortex")

Fernando Bujones

Choreography ("Black Swan")

Peter Burrell

Assistant Director

Frederic Chopin

Music ("Etude")

Jean Coralli

Music ("Giselle")

Richard Cragun

Choreography

John Cranko

Choreography ("Legende")

Carl Czerny

Music ("Etudes")

Glenn Dictorow

Music Conductor

Scott Douglass

Choreography ("Anna Karenina")

Duke Ellington

Song ("Vortex")

Suzanne Farrell

Choreography ("Pas De Deux")

Wayne Fitzgerald

Titles

William Hartman

Sound Editor

Marcia Haydee

Choreography

Howard Jeffrey

Other

Jerry Jost

Sound Recording Mixer

Nora Kaye

Executive Producer

John Lanchbery

Music; Music Director

Harald Lander

Music ("Etudes")

Arthur Laurents

Producer

Arthur Laurents

Screenwriter

Kenneth Macmillan

Choreography

Marvin March

Set Decorator

Peter Martins

Choreography ("Pas De Deux")

Ludwig Minkus

Music ("La Bayadere" "Don Quixote")

Alexander Minz

Choreography ("La Bayadere")

Dennis Nahat

Choreography ("Anna Karenina")

Jules Perrot

Music ("Giselle")

Marius Petipa

Choreography ("Black Swan" "Le Corsaire" "La Bayadere" "Swan Lake" "Don Quixote" "Etude")

Nananne Porcher

Theatrical Lighting

Serge Prokofiev

Music ("Romeo And Juliet")

William H. Reynolds

Editor

William Reynolds

Editor

Jack Roe

Assistant Director

Herbert Ross

Producer

Roger Rothstein

Associate Producer

Charles Schram

Makeup

Antoinette Sibley

Choreography ("Aurora'S Wedding")

Oliver Smith

Art Consultant

Theodore Soderberg

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Richard Sperber

Sound Editor

Robert Surtees

Director Of Photography

Robert Surtees

Dp/Cinematographer

Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Music

Henryk Wieniawsky

Music ("Legende")

Albert Wolsky

Costumes

Film Details

Also Known As
Turning Point, tournant de la vie
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1977
Production Company
20th Century Fox
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox; 20th Century Fox Distribution; Rank Film Distributors Ltd
Location
New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 59m
Sound
Dolby
Color
Color (DeLuxe)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Award Nominations

Best Actress

1977
Anne Bancroft

Best Actress

1977
Shirley Maclaine

Best Art Direction

1977
Albert Brenner

Best Cinematography

1977

Best Director

1977
Herbert Ross

Best Editing

1977

Best Picture

1977

Best Sound

1977

Best Supporting Actor

1977
Mikhail Baryshnikov

Best Supporting Actress

1977

Best Writing, Screenplay

1978

Articles

Martha Scott, 1914-2003


Martha Scott, the actress who originated the role of Emily Webb in the stage and film versions of Thornton Wilder's Pulitzer Prize winning Our Town died on May 28 at a hospital in Van Nuys, California due to natural causes. She was 88.

Martha Ellen Scott was born in Jamesport, Missouri on September 24, 1914, and raised in Kansas City, where a high school teacher encouraged her interest in acting. She majored in drama at the University of Michigan and after graduation, she joined The Globe Theatre Troupe, a stock company that performed truncated Shakespeare at the Chicago World's Fair in between 1933-34. She went to New York soon after and found work in radio and stock before playing making her breakthrough as Emily Webb in Our Town. When the play opened on Broadway in February 1938, Scott received glowing reviews in the pivotal role of Emily, the wistful girl-next-door in Grovers Corners, New Hampshire, who marries her high school sweetheart, dies in pregnancy and gets to relive a single day back on Earth. Her stage success brought her to Hollywood, where she continued her role in Sam Wood's film adaptation of Out Town (1940). Scott received an Academy Award nomination for best actress and was immediately hailed as the year's new female discovery.

She gave nicely understated performances in her next few films: as Jane Peyton Howard in Frank Lloyd's historical The Howards of Virginia (1940), opposite Cary Grant; the dedicated school teacher in Tay Garnett's Cheers for Miss Bishop (1941) in which she aged convincingly from 17 to 85; and as a devoted wife to preacher Frederic March in Irving Rapper's warm family drama One Foot in Heaven (1941). Sadly, Scott's maturity and sensitivity ran against the glamour-girl persona that was popular in the '40s (best embodied by stars like Lana Turner and Veronica Lake) and her film appearances were few and far between for the remainder of the decade.

Her fortunes brightened in the '50s, when she found roles in major productions, such as a suburban wife trapped in her home by fugitives, led by Humphrey Bogart, in William Wyler's taut The Desperate Hours (1955) and played Charlton Heston's mother in the Cecil B. Demille's The Ten Commandments (1956) and again for William Wyler in Ben-Hur (1959). Scott found steady work for the next 30 years in matronly roles, most notably on television, where she played Bob Newhart's mother on The Bob Newhart Show (1972-1978) and the mother of Sue Ellen Ewing on Dallas (1978-1991). Her second husband, pianist and Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Mel Powell, died in 1998. Survivors include a son and two daughters.

by Michael T. Toole
Martha Scott, 1914-2003

Martha Scott, 1914-2003

Martha Scott, the actress who originated the role of Emily Webb in the stage and film versions of Thornton Wilder's Pulitzer Prize winning Our Town died on May 28 at a hospital in Van Nuys, California due to natural causes. She was 88. Martha Ellen Scott was born in Jamesport, Missouri on September 24, 1914, and raised in Kansas City, where a high school teacher encouraged her interest in acting. She majored in drama at the University of Michigan and after graduation, she joined The Globe Theatre Troupe, a stock company that performed truncated Shakespeare at the Chicago World's Fair in between 1933-34. She went to New York soon after and found work in radio and stock before playing making her breakthrough as Emily Webb in Our Town. When the play opened on Broadway in February 1938, Scott received glowing reviews in the pivotal role of Emily, the wistful girl-next-door in Grovers Corners, New Hampshire, who marries her high school sweetheart, dies in pregnancy and gets to relive a single day back on Earth. Her stage success brought her to Hollywood, where she continued her role in Sam Wood's film adaptation of Out Town (1940). Scott received an Academy Award nomination for best actress and was immediately hailed as the year's new female discovery. She gave nicely understated performances in her next few films: as Jane Peyton Howard in Frank Lloyd's historical The Howards of Virginia (1940), opposite Cary Grant; the dedicated school teacher in Tay Garnett's Cheers for Miss Bishop (1941) in which she aged convincingly from 17 to 85; and as a devoted wife to preacher Frederic March in Irving Rapper's warm family drama One Foot in Heaven (1941). Sadly, Scott's maturity and sensitivity ran against the glamour-girl persona that was popular in the '40s (best embodied by stars like Lana Turner and Veronica Lake) and her film appearances were few and far between for the remainder of the decade. Her fortunes brightened in the '50s, when she found roles in major productions, such as a suburban wife trapped in her home by fugitives, led by Humphrey Bogart, in William Wyler's taut The Desperate Hours (1955) and played Charlton Heston's mother in the Cecil B. Demille's The Ten Commandments (1956) and again for William Wyler in Ben-Hur (1959). Scott found steady work for the next 30 years in matronly roles, most notably on television, where she played Bob Newhart's mother on The Bob Newhart Show (1972-1978) and the mother of Sue Ellen Ewing on Dallas (1978-1991). Her second husband, pianist and Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Mel Powell, died in 1998. Survivors include a son and two daughters. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Care to have supper?
- Yuri
I'm busy.
- Emilia
After supper?
- Yuri
Bed.
- Emilia
Ok! . . . Emilia, it's joke!
- Yuri
You know, only this morning she came up to me and she said, "Sevilla, deary, you're the greatest prima ballerina in the whole world".
- Sevilla
No, I am.
- Yuri

Trivia

Jointly holds the record (with Color Purple, The (1985)) for the film with most Oscar nominations without a single win (11).

Audrey Hepburn was offered one of the lead roles in this film.

'Grace Kelly' was offered one of the leads in the film.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall November 14, 1977

Released in United States Fall November 14, 1977