Tron


1h 36m 1982

Brief Synopsis

A computer genius falls into the game he's designed and has to fight an evil intelligence he accidentally created.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Fantasy
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1982

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 36m

Synopsis

A computer genius falls into the game he's designed and has to fight an evil intelligence he accidentally created.

Crew

John Aardal

Animator

Robert Abel

Titles

Rodger Allers

Production

Roger Allers

Concept Artist

Frank Amador

Rotoscope Animator

Peter Aries

Other

Richard Baily

Other

Don Baker

Animator

Edle Bakke

Script Supervisor

Dave Barnett

Other

John Beach

Producer

Tom Bisogno

Producer

Peter Blinn

Effects Coordinator

Richard Bowden

Music

Bob Broughton

Other

Jan Browning

Matte Painter

Deena Burkett

Effects Coordinator

Bill Burton

Stunts

Richard Butler

Stunt Coordinator

Don Button

Effects Coordinator

Jorge Calandrelli

Original Music

Glenn Campbell

Animator

Nancy Hunter Campi

Other

Wendy Carlos

Music

Wendy Carlos

Other

Chris Casady

Visual Effects

Martin O Cohen

Other

Kerry Colonna

Effects Coordinator

Clint Colver

Effects Coordinator

Barry Cook

Visual Effects

Michael G Craig

Production Assistant

Champ Davenport

Other

James Deeth

Stunts

Bennie Dobbins

Stunts

William Dungan

Other

Art Durinski

Visual Effects

Lee Dyer

Digital Effects Supervisor

Douglas Eby

Animator

Gordon Ecker

Sound Editor

Rita Egleston

Stunts

Harrison Ellenshaw

Visual Effects Supervisor

Harrison Ellenshaw

Associate Producer

Gary Epper

Stunts

George Epperson

Animator

Gail Finkeldei

Visual Effects

Michael Fremer

Sound Design

Michael Fremer

Music

Michael Fremer

Music Supervisor

Bernie Gagliano

Photography

Douglas Gamley

Music

Donna Garrett

Stunts

Michael Gibson

Effects Coordinator

Jean Giraud

Other

Baylis Glascock

Assistant Editor

Jeff Gourson

Editor

Kris Gregg

Other

Kris Gregg

Photography

John Grower

Effects Coordinator

Marian Guder

Effects Coordinator

Bob Hathaway

Sound Supervisor

Walter Hekking

Assistant Editor

Paul Hernandez

Other

Gregg Heschong

Camera Operator

Larry Holt

Stunts

Hank Hooker

Stunts

Dave Inglish

Other

Dave Iwerks

Photography

Don Iwerks

Mechanical Special Effects

Don Iwerks

Other

Debra Devito Jackson

Production Assistant

Gary Jensen

Stunts

Elois Jenssen

Costumes

Al Jones

Stunts

Jim Keating

Effects Coordinator

Randy Kelley

Sound Effects Editor

Randy Kelley

Sound Editor

Gayl Kelm

Rotoscope Animator

Dick Kendall

Animator

Pat Kenly

Other

Pat Kenly

Photography

Mark Kimbell

Other

Jeff Kleiser

Production Supervisor

Bill Kovacs

Other

Bill Kroyer

Visual Effects

Donald Kushner

Producer

Chris Lane

Production

Gene Larmon

Photography

Jim Larue

Sound

Donald Leich

Animator

Fred M. Lerner

Stunts

David V Lester

Post-Production Supervisor

Gary Liddiard

Makeup

Steven Lisberger

Screenplay

Steven Lisberger

Visual Effects

Steven Lisberger

From Story

Steven Lisberger

Story By

Peter Lloyd

Visual Effects

Peter Lloyd

Other

Bruce Logan

Director Of Photography

Bruce Logan

Other

Bruce Logan

Dp/Cinematographer

Bonnie Macbird

From Story

Bonnie Macbird

Story By

Larry Malone

Other

Jack Manning

Other

John Mansbridge

Art Director

Lisa Marmon

Assistant Director

Annie Mceveety

Animator

Steve Mceveety

Post-Production Supervisor

Tim Mcgovern

Other

Tim Mcgovern

Titles

Mal Mcmillan

Other

Syd Mead

Other

Vince Melandri

Sound Editor

Vince Melandri

Sound Effects Editor

Rexford Metz

Camera Operator

Anthony R Milch

Sound Editor

Anthony R Milch

Sound Effects Editor

Gene Miller

Animator

Ron Miller

Executive Producer

Bob Minkler

Sound

Lee Minkler

Sound

Michael Minkler

Sound

Kenny Mirman

Technical Director

Phillip Mittelman

Other

Dean Edward Mitzner

Production Designer

Mical Morrish

Production Assistant

John Mosley

Sound

Peter Mueller

Production

Kieran Mulgrew

Animator

Craig Newman

Effects Coordinator

John Norton

Production

John Norton

Visual Effects

Rosanna Norton

Costumes

Denise Olivo

Production Assistant

Ron Osenbaugh

Rotoscope Animator

Bob Otto

Other

Bob Otto

Mechanical Special Effects

Auril Pebley

Visual Effects

Julian Pena

Other

Kenneth Perlin

Other

Jim Pickel

Digital Effects Supervisor

Pam Polifroni

Casting

Don Porterfield

Other

Don Porterfield

Mechanical Special Effects

Marty Prager

Other

Stan Reed

Key Grip

Jerry Rees

Visual Effects

Craig W Reynolds

Other

Ross Reynolds

Stunts

Lorry Richter

Wardrobe

Roger Rinati

Rotoscope Animator

Al Roelofs

Art Director

Darrell Rooney

Visual Effects

Nedra Rosemond-watt

Wardrobe

Dana Ross

Animator

Marta Russell

Visual Effects

Wilbur Russell

Props

Lorin Salob

Assistant Director

Lorin B Salob

Assistant Director

Jack Sandeen

Costume Supervisor

Ralph Sariego

Unit Production Manager

John Scheele

Technical Supervisor

Robert J. Schiffer

Makeup Supervisor

Michael Schilz

Production Assistant

Ted Schilz

Production Manager

Jeremy Schwartz

Other

David Scott

Rotoscope Animator

Walter Scott

Stunts

Frank Serafine

Sound Effects

Roger M Shook

Set Decorator

Jesse Silver

Visual Effects

Lynn Singer

Matte Painter

R J Spetter

Mechanical Special Effects

Herbert Steinberg

Other

Linda D Stokes

Effects Coordinator

Richard F. Taylor

Visual Effects Supervisor

Richard F. Taylor

Digital Effects Supervisor

Richard F. Taylor

Other

Bill Tondreau

Other

Eugene Troubetzkoy

Other

John T Van Vliet

Visual Effects

Ron Vargas

Camera Operator

Neil Viker

Animator

Frank Vitz

Titles

Frank Vitz

Other

Paul Wainess

Animator

Marvin Walowitz

Sound Editor

Marvin Walowitz

Sound Effects Editor

Chris Wedge

Other

Brandy Whittington

Animator

Glenn Wilder

Stunts

Michael Wilhoit

Foley Editor

Lynn Wilkinson

Production Coordinator

Wendy Susan Williams

Production Assistant

James Winburn

Stunts

Mike Wolf

Visual Effects

Arnie Wong

Production Supervisor

Paulette Woods

Other

Joy Zapata

Hair

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Fantasy
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1982

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 36m

Award Nominations

Best Costume Design

1982

Best Sound

1982

Articles

Tron


Considered one of the precursors of film's digital era, Tron (1982) stands today as an impressive achievement, and a sweet reminder of the optimism held at the brink of the computer age. Starring Jeff Bridges, Bruce Boxleitner and David Warner, Tron is like a modern Metropolis (1927), pushing to new technical frontiers, telling the story of tyranny in a strange yet familiar world, and creating unforgettably beautiful moments of neon-glow filmmaking. Bridges plays Flynn, a whiz-kid programmer who has had all of his game ideas stolen by Dillinger (played to perfection by David Warner), head of ENCOM. Meanwhile, Master Control Program (MCP), installed by Dillinger, is gaining power in the ENCOM system and running amuck, failing to fear even its maker. Flynn tries repeatedly to hack into the ENCOM computers to retrieve the evidence that will prove the games are his, while his friend and ex-coworker Alan (Boxleitner), tries in vain to implement a guardian program, Tron (also played by Boxleitner), which would monitor Master Control. Needless to say, MCP is not interested in having its activities overseen or its system hacked. Through a clever sequence of events, Flynn is digitized and brought inside the domain of MCP, who now hopes to have him destroyed in its gladiator-type games, like so many other programs MCP has kidnapped for destructive entertainment (the characters even wear togas over their circuitry). MCP would also like to put an end to the meddling Tron, who is far too good at the games and difficult to control.

It took 36 outlines and 18 rewrites of the script before director/writer Steven Lisberger and producer Donald Kushner felt they'd gotten the story right. In a 1998 interview with Realhollywood.com, Lisberger, who came to film via animation, explains the genesis of Tron: "The idea was to come up with a character made out of light and one of our designer/animators, John Norton, designed this warrior who was made up of neon -- looked like neon. . . . And, he looked electronic and from that came Tron. . . . once that footage existed it was alive and couldn't be stopped. Here's this interesting character -- where do we put him? And, it made sense to put him in an electronic dimension. One thing lead to another."

Unable to secure initial financing, Lisberger and Kushner put up $300,000 out of their own pockets to create a development package to present to major studios. It included a script, the entire film in storyboards, designs and a sample reel of proposed effects. Disney bought it, securing the deal several months before the computerized video game craze took off. Though Tron didn't provide the jump-start to Disney's slumping family film market that studio executives had hoped for, it did exemplify the risk-taking sensibilities that had been a hallmark of the studio's earlier days with its production of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954), for example. Unfortunately, filmgoers in the early '80s didn't know quite what to make of Tron, though a successful Tron video game, released later in 1982, out-grossed the film's box-office take. Over time, the movie and the game have built a cult following and there are rumors that a film sequel may be in the works.

Tron represents the first use of computer-generated, 3-D imagery to produce effects that had previously been done with miniatures, model sets and matte paintings. The film contains 40 minutes of computer animation, much of it combined with live action elements shot against a black screen. The live action that occurs inside the computer was filmed in black and white and later colorized with photographic and rotoscopic techniques -- giving the film that magical silent-era look. These new techniques posed a challenge for the actors. Reportedly, Peter O'Toole was offered the role of Dillinger/Sark but balked at the black-screen notion and passed. "A lot of the time we had no idea what kind of world we would be in," says Jeff Bridges. "But Steven kept video games right on the set. If you were on a streak, people would gather around and he would postpone shooting. Then you'd pop right into the scene with this adrenaline buzz."

The demand of the work was extreme. In some of the film's more complex sequences, like the Solar Sailer moving through metal canyons, it took up to six hours to generate individual frames. "The medium is the message of this film," Lisberger told Rolling Stone in 1982. "The main character is sent into an electronic world that he's helped create, and has to deal with it. The filmmakers were put in a very similar situation."

Producer: Donald Kushner
Director: Steven M. Lisberger
Screenplay: Steven M. Lisberger, Charles Haas
Art Direction: Al Y. Roelofs, John Mansbridge
Cinematography: Bruce Logan
Editing: Jeff Gourson
Music: Wendy Carlos
Principal Cast: Jeff Bridges (Kevin Flynn/Clu), Bruce Boxleitner (Alan Bradley/Tron), David Warner (Ed Dillinger/Sark), Cindy Morgan (Lora/Yori), Barnard Hughes (Dr. Walter Gibbs/Dumont).
C-96m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning.

by Emily Soares
Tron

Tron

Considered one of the precursors of film's digital era, Tron (1982) stands today as an impressive achievement, and a sweet reminder of the optimism held at the brink of the computer age. Starring Jeff Bridges, Bruce Boxleitner and David Warner, Tron is like a modern Metropolis (1927), pushing to new technical frontiers, telling the story of tyranny in a strange yet familiar world, and creating unforgettably beautiful moments of neon-glow filmmaking. Bridges plays Flynn, a whiz-kid programmer who has had all of his game ideas stolen by Dillinger (played to perfection by David Warner), head of ENCOM. Meanwhile, Master Control Program (MCP), installed by Dillinger, is gaining power in the ENCOM system and running amuck, failing to fear even its maker. Flynn tries repeatedly to hack into the ENCOM computers to retrieve the evidence that will prove the games are his, while his friend and ex-coworker Alan (Boxleitner), tries in vain to implement a guardian program, Tron (also played by Boxleitner), which would monitor Master Control. Needless to say, MCP is not interested in having its activities overseen or its system hacked. Through a clever sequence of events, Flynn is digitized and brought inside the domain of MCP, who now hopes to have him destroyed in its gladiator-type games, like so many other programs MCP has kidnapped for destructive entertainment (the characters even wear togas over their circuitry). MCP would also like to put an end to the meddling Tron, who is far too good at the games and difficult to control. It took 36 outlines and 18 rewrites of the script before director/writer Steven Lisberger and producer Donald Kushner felt they'd gotten the story right. In a 1998 interview with Realhollywood.com, Lisberger, who came to film via animation, explains the genesis of Tron: "The idea was to come up with a character made out of light and one of our designer/animators, John Norton, designed this warrior who was made up of neon -- looked like neon. . . . And, he looked electronic and from that came Tron. . . . once that footage existed it was alive and couldn't be stopped. Here's this interesting character -- where do we put him? And, it made sense to put him in an electronic dimension. One thing lead to another." Unable to secure initial financing, Lisberger and Kushner put up $300,000 out of their own pockets to create a development package to present to major studios. It included a script, the entire film in storyboards, designs and a sample reel of proposed effects. Disney bought it, securing the deal several months before the computerized video game craze took off. Though Tron didn't provide the jump-start to Disney's slumping family film market that studio executives had hoped for, it did exemplify the risk-taking sensibilities that had been a hallmark of the studio's earlier days with its production of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954), for example. Unfortunately, filmgoers in the early '80s didn't know quite what to make of Tron, though a successful Tron video game, released later in 1982, out-grossed the film's box-office take. Over time, the movie and the game have built a cult following and there are rumors that a film sequel may be in the works. Tron represents the first use of computer-generated, 3-D imagery to produce effects that had previously been done with miniatures, model sets and matte paintings. The film contains 40 minutes of computer animation, much of it combined with live action elements shot against a black screen. The live action that occurs inside the computer was filmed in black and white and later colorized with photographic and rotoscopic techniques -- giving the film that magical silent-era look. These new techniques posed a challenge for the actors. Reportedly, Peter O'Toole was offered the role of Dillinger/Sark but balked at the black-screen notion and passed. "A lot of the time we had no idea what kind of world we would be in," says Jeff Bridges. "But Steven kept video games right on the set. If you were on a streak, people would gather around and he would postpone shooting. Then you'd pop right into the scene with this adrenaline buzz." The demand of the work was extreme. In some of the film's more complex sequences, like the Solar Sailer moving through metal canyons, it took up to six hours to generate individual frames. "The medium is the message of this film," Lisberger told Rolling Stone in 1982. "The main character is sent into an electronic world that he's helped create, and has to deal with it. The filmmakers were put in a very similar situation." Producer: Donald Kushner Director: Steven M. Lisberger Screenplay: Steven M. Lisberger, Charles Haas Art Direction: Al Y. Roelofs, John Mansbridge Cinematography: Bruce Logan Editing: Jeff Gourson Music: Wendy Carlos Principal Cast: Jeff Bridges (Kevin Flynn/Clu), Bruce Boxleitner (Alan Bradley/Tron), David Warner (Ed Dillinger/Sark), Cindy Morgan (Lora/Yori), Barnard Hughes (Dr. Walter Gibbs/Dumont). C-96m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning. by Emily Soares

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States July 1982

Released in United States Summer July 9, 1982

First film to use computer-generated images instead of miniature models, matte paintings, and other optical effects in conjunction with live action.

Released in United States July 1982

Released in United States Summer July 9, 1982