The 30-Foot Bride of Candy Rock


1h 15m 1959

Brief Synopsis

A scatterbrained inventor accidentally turns his girlfriend into a giant.

Film Details

Also Known As
Lou Costello and His 30-Foot Bride, The Secret Bride of Candy Rock
Genre
Comedy
Fantasy
Sci-Fi
Release Date
Aug 1959
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
D.R.B., Inc.
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 15m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Synopsis

In the small town of Candy Rock, rubbish collector and amateur inventor Artie Pinsetter tinkers with "Max," his thinking machine. Artie owns the only independent business in a town controlled by Raven Rossiter, who has decided to expand his venue by running for governor. One day, while Raven is being interviewed by television personality Bill Burton, Artie walks into the Rossiter-owned radio station to buy more radio parts and tubes to implant in Max. Raven agrees to extend the cash-strapped Artie credit in exchange for his promise to stop dating Raven's niece Emmy Lou. Later, at the Rossiter home, Emmy Lou sings Artie's praises to her aunt May. When Artie arrives to pick up the trash, Emmy Lou climbs into an empty trash barrel that Artie loads onto his truck. Artie then drives to Dinosaur State Park with his dog Corporal. After climbing out of the barrel, Emmy Lou asks Artie to marry her, and when Max forbids the union, Emmy Lou angrily runs into a nearby cave. Minutes later, she emerges as a woman who is now thirty-feet tall. A panicked Artie drives to the Rossiter home to inform Raven that Emmy Lou has "gotten big." Thinking that Artie means she is pregnant, Raven, fearing a scandal, arranges for Magruder, the justice of the peace, immediately to marry Emmy Lou and Artie. On the drive back to the park, Artie stops at a surplus store to buy a parachute that Emmy Lou later fashions into a wedding dress. Magruder, who is blind without his glasses, is unable to see Emmy Lou until he asks for a kiss from the bride. When Emmy Lou looms over him to proffer her cheek, he flees in fear. That night, Artie studies his colossal bride. The next morning, when Emmy Lou awakens and announces that she is ravenous, Artie hurries into town to forage for food. When Artie blurts out that Emmy Lou is now thirty-feet tall, Raven, concerned that the news may damage his campaign, arranges for a caravan of trucks to deliver food to his starving niece and gives her a barn located ten miles from town as a honeymoon cottage. After loading Emmy Lou onto a flatbed truck, they drive her to the barn where she asks to take a shower. As Artie sprays her with a fire hose, she begins to grow again. Meanwhile, a series of war games are being staged at the park, and when a military helicopter flies over the barn, the pilot spots Emmy Lou protruding from the roof. The pilot's addled report about a giant woman causes the general in charge to cancel the games. Peeved, the Pentagon demands an explanation, and when a sergeant explains that they have sighted a monster, the Pentagon issues an alert about invaders from space. Meanwhile, at the Booster's Club, a benevolent organization headed by Raven, Raven is boasting of his achievements to Burton when Artie bursts in to tell him that his niece is still growing. Flustered, Raven gets rid of Artie by making him a Booster and giving him a fancy new car. As Artie drives off, Jackie Delaney, the town flirt, jumps into his car. When they reach the barn, Emmy Lou jealously bellows at Jackie to "keep her hands off" Artie. After Jackie runs off screaming, Emmy Lou, angered by Artie's "infidelity" and her uncle's insistence on controlling her life, decides to go to Candy Rock where she climbs atop a building and cackles down at the citizenry. Desperate, Artie returns to the park and asks Max for help. Meanwhile, the military has been trailing Emmy Lou and passes her coordinates along to the Pentagon. Emmy Lou returns to the park just as the military launches a series of missiles at her. After Max sends a signal that causes the missiles to collide, the troops arrive armed with bazookas. To avoid the weapons, Artie orders Max to take them all back in time, and after Max sends them to the era of the Civil War and then the Stone Age, Artie realizes that Max has finally proved its genius and asks the machine to shrink Emmy Lou. After Max shrinks Emmy Lou into a miniature woman, the soliders arrive and demand to see the giant from outer space. Raven then comes to the park with Burton, and when Artie boasts that he has developed a machine that can bend time and space, Burton invites him to appear on his show instead of Raven. After the soldiers confiscate Max, Emmy Lou returns to normal size and Corporal, now a giant, tags along behind them.


Film Details

Also Known As
Lou Costello and His 30-Foot Bride, The Secret Bride of Candy Rock
Genre
Comedy
Fantasy
Sci-Fi
Release Date
Aug 1959
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
D.R.B., Inc.
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 15m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Articles

The 30-Foot Bride of Candy Rock


After more than 20 years together, during which time they had become tremendous stage, film, radio and television successes, Bud Abbott and Lou Costello dissolved their comedy partnership not long after their last movie, Dance with Me, Henry (1956). Straight man Abbott virtually called it quits after the split, making only a couple brief TV appearances and in 1966 providing his own voice in an animated series based on the team. Lou Costello, however, had big plans for the future. His ex-partner's junior by 11 years, Lou was looking forward to a number of potential projects: emcee of a new comedy quiz show on TV, Las Vegas nightclub appearances, and his greatest dream, a movie based on the life of beloved New York Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia. Although he made several television appearances and broke attendance records with his Vegas show at the Dunes Hotel, his other plans never materialized. Ill with the rheumatic fever he had contracted in the early 1940s, he died three days short of his 53rd birthday and just a few months before the release of his final film, The 30 Foot Bride of Candy Rock (1959). At the premiere of the movie, his widow expressed her disappointment in the picture's quality with a line worthy of one of Abbott and Costello's routines: "It would have killed him."

Costello plays Artie Pinsetter, a junkman and part-time inventor whose latest contraption expands his lovely young girlfriend to the incredible size of the title. Reporting the mishap, Artie's flustered news that she's "gotten big" is taken by her despotic businessman father to mean "pregnant," and he arranges a shotgun wedding for the two. The rest of the picture follows the couple's efforts to achieve some sort of domestic normality while Artie seeks a way to return her to normal size.

While the reviews were as unenthusiastic as the public's response, The 30 Foot Bride of Candy Rock did exude a certain juvenile appeal, thanks in some measure to director Sidney Miller. His early stint as a child star included appearances with old pal Mickey Rooney in Boys Town (1938), Babes on Broadway (1941) and five other pictures between 1939 and 1941. He gave up performing in the mid-50s to try his hand at directing, immediately landing work as the director of The Mickey Mouse Club TV series. Thanks to his own experiences as an underage actor, Miller saw to it that the kid stars of the show were treated with no-nonsense professionalism and dignity, and he eliminated interference from overbearing stage parents by having them banned from the set. Miller later took the helm of several other popular shows, including Get Smart, My Favorite Martian and The Monkees. He returned to performing in the 1960s with small roles in dozens of movies and TV shows.

After landing the title role in her film debut, The Bonnie Parker Story (1958), co-star Dorothy Provine enjoyed success into the 1960s on many TV shows and a handful of movies, including It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World (1963), as the put-upon wife of Milton Berle, and Good Neighbor Sam (1964), as the put-upon wife of Jack Lemmon. After marrying director Robert Day in 1969, she retired from the business, except for the occasional appearance. Gale Gordon, who plays her mean-spirited father in this picture, had a long and busy stage, radio and film career but is probably best-known as the flustered nemesis/victim of wacky Lucy in several of Lucille Ball's TV incarnations.

A mixture of slapstick farce, domestic comedy and sci-fi parody (obviously influenced by Attack of the 50 Foot Woman (1958), which was released the previous year), The 30 Foot Bride of Candy Rock featured scenes in which the oversized bride wears a tunic based on a parachute and her hapless husband's invention transforms from time machine to rocket ship. Only one thing could have made this movie more bizarre; according to Costello's friend and stunt double, Vic Parks, Liberace was to have played a role in the movie but for whatever reason, it never happened.

Director: Sidney Miller
Producer: Edward Sherman, Lewis J. Rachmil
Screenplay: Rowland Barber, Arthur A. Ross
Cinematography: Frank G. Carson
Editing: Al Clark
Art Direction: William Flannery
Original Music: Raoul Kraushaar, Rudy Schrager
Special Visual Effects: Irving Block, Louis DeWitt, Jack Rabin
Cast: Lou Costello (Artie Pinsetter), Dorothy Provine (Emmy Lou Raven), Gale Gordon (Raven), Jimmy Conlin (Magruder), Charles Lane (Standard Bates).
BW-75m.

by Rob Nixon
The 30-Foot Bride Of Candy Rock

The 30-Foot Bride of Candy Rock

After more than 20 years together, during which time they had become tremendous stage, film, radio and television successes, Bud Abbott and Lou Costello dissolved their comedy partnership not long after their last movie, Dance with Me, Henry (1956). Straight man Abbott virtually called it quits after the split, making only a couple brief TV appearances and in 1966 providing his own voice in an animated series based on the team. Lou Costello, however, had big plans for the future. His ex-partner's junior by 11 years, Lou was looking forward to a number of potential projects: emcee of a new comedy quiz show on TV, Las Vegas nightclub appearances, and his greatest dream, a movie based on the life of beloved New York Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia. Although he made several television appearances and broke attendance records with his Vegas show at the Dunes Hotel, his other plans never materialized. Ill with the rheumatic fever he had contracted in the early 1940s, he died three days short of his 53rd birthday and just a few months before the release of his final film, The 30 Foot Bride of Candy Rock (1959). At the premiere of the movie, his widow expressed her disappointment in the picture's quality with a line worthy of one of Abbott and Costello's routines: "It would have killed him." Costello plays Artie Pinsetter, a junkman and part-time inventor whose latest contraption expands his lovely young girlfriend to the incredible size of the title. Reporting the mishap, Artie's flustered news that she's "gotten big" is taken by her despotic businessman father to mean "pregnant," and he arranges a shotgun wedding for the two. The rest of the picture follows the couple's efforts to achieve some sort of domestic normality while Artie seeks a way to return her to normal size. While the reviews were as unenthusiastic as the public's response, The 30 Foot Bride of Candy Rock did exude a certain juvenile appeal, thanks in some measure to director Sidney Miller. His early stint as a child star included appearances with old pal Mickey Rooney in Boys Town (1938), Babes on Broadway (1941) and five other pictures between 1939 and 1941. He gave up performing in the mid-50s to try his hand at directing, immediately landing work as the director of The Mickey Mouse Club TV series. Thanks to his own experiences as an underage actor, Miller saw to it that the kid stars of the show were treated with no-nonsense professionalism and dignity, and he eliminated interference from overbearing stage parents by having them banned from the set. Miller later took the helm of several other popular shows, including Get Smart, My Favorite Martian and The Monkees. He returned to performing in the 1960s with small roles in dozens of movies and TV shows. After landing the title role in her film debut, The Bonnie Parker Story (1958), co-star Dorothy Provine enjoyed success into the 1960s on many TV shows and a handful of movies, including It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World (1963), as the put-upon wife of Milton Berle, and Good Neighbor Sam (1964), as the put-upon wife of Jack Lemmon. After marrying director Robert Day in 1969, she retired from the business, except for the occasional appearance. Gale Gordon, who plays her mean-spirited father in this picture, had a long and busy stage, radio and film career but is probably best-known as the flustered nemesis/victim of wacky Lucy in several of Lucille Ball's TV incarnations. A mixture of slapstick farce, domestic comedy and sci-fi parody (obviously influenced by Attack of the 50 Foot Woman (1958), which was released the previous year), The 30 Foot Bride of Candy Rock featured scenes in which the oversized bride wears a tunic based on a parachute and her hapless husband's invention transforms from time machine to rocket ship. Only one thing could have made this movie more bizarre; according to Costello's friend and stunt double, Vic Parks, Liberace was to have played a role in the movie but for whatever reason, it never happened. Director: Sidney Miller Producer: Edward Sherman, Lewis J. Rachmil Screenplay: Rowland Barber, Arthur A. Ross Cinematography: Frank G. Carson Editing: Al Clark Art Direction: William Flannery Original Music: Raoul Kraushaar, Rudy Schrager Special Visual Effects: Irving Block, Louis DeWitt, Jack Rabin Cast: Lou Costello (Artie Pinsetter), Dorothy Provine (Emmy Lou Raven), Gale Gordon (Raven), Jimmy Conlin (Magruder), Charles Lane (Standard Bates). BW-75m. by Rob Nixon

Quotes

Trivia

This was Lou Costello's last film, and his only starring role without Bud Abbott.

This film was not released until about five months after the death of Lou Costello.

Notes

The working titles of this film were The Secret Bride of Candy Rock and Lou Costello and His 30-Foot Bride. The onscreen credit for the production company reads "A D.R.B. Production. DeWitt-Rabin-Block." Louis DeWitt, Jack Rabin and Irving Block are also credited with the film's special effects, and Rabin and Block are credited with the story idea. Edward Sherman, the film's executive producer, was Lou Costello's manager. Although a December 1958 Hollywood Reporter news item notes that the film was to mark the film debut of Lou's daughter, Carole Costello, her appearance in the released picture has not been confirmed.
       The 3-Foot Bride of Candy Rock was the only film in which Costello appeared without his longtime partner, Bud Abbott, and was Costello's last film. Costello died of a heart attack on March 3, 1959, less than three months after production was completed. The film also marked the feature film directorial debut of Sidney Miller, who began his career as a child actor in the 1930s, and had previously worked as a television director.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1959

The last screen appearance of Lou Costello, who died at age 53, on March 3, 1959.

Amazoscope

Released in United States 1959